Baking Using A Soup Can (Or Any Food Item Can)

Decorating By MariaLovesCakes Updated 7 Nov 2005 , 6:36pm by bitte

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MariaLovesCakes Posted 5 Oct 2005 , 5:29pm
post #1 of 37

Has anyone used a soup can, or any food type, to bake a cake to get the cylindrical shape?

I saw on the Food Network channel a restaurant that was famous for making a cake using a can. I forgot the type of cake it was, but it was very moist and they were well recognized for it.

I am making a tree and wanted to use this method but wanted to know if any of use had done it and the results...

36 replies
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jekizer Posted 5 Oct 2005 , 5:33pm
post #2 of 37

I don't know how to do this, but I am extremely interested. I think it would be a neat idea for a number of things. Good luck and remember to post your pics when your done. icon_smile.gif

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bubblezmom Posted 5 Oct 2005 , 5:35pm
post #3 of 37

Sorry, haven't tried making turrets or trees. I have read that you are supposed to line the cans with parchement paper. I don't see why it wouldn't work.

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Mac Posted 5 Oct 2005 , 5:47pm
post #4 of 37

I have used tuna cans. Just washed them really well. I think most items in cans are heated for food safety. And I have used a coffee can to make a bucket.

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ngarza07 Posted 5 Oct 2005 , 5:48pm
post #5 of 37

Try searching for hobo bread to get some ideas of how this would work. I was going to try this a month ago but went another route.

Good luck.

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crimsonhair Posted 5 Oct 2005 , 5:50pm
post #6 of 37

I have baked some of my christmas cakes in cans.. I grease them, then line them with greased parchement paper .. this way they come out easily.
Liz

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mvigil Posted 5 Oct 2005 , 5:51pm
post #7 of 37

Hi Mac I wanted to ask what degree would you bake this at ??
From a small tuna can to a large coffe can??

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JoAnnB Posted 5 Oct 2005 , 5:52pm
post #8 of 37

Cans work great for baking most things. Be sure they are very clean-run them through the diswasher. If you have concerns about the cake sticking, use ring of parchment on the bottom. and grease the sides well. Then it should slide right out.

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Misdawn Posted 5 Oct 2005 , 5:54pm
post #9 of 37

I have used coffee cans. They work really well. I've always baked using a regular cake mix at 325 degrees. You just have to keep an eye on it to see when it's done baking.

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momsandraven Posted 5 Oct 2005 , 5:55pm
post #10 of 37

I have baked small loaves of beer bread in soup cans before, works great! I haven't done it in a long time though, I'll have to dig around and see if I can find the recipe/info for temps etc.

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mvigil Posted 5 Oct 2005 , 5:55pm
post #11 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Misdawn

I have used coffee cans. They work really well. I've always baked using a regular cake mix at 325 degrees. You just have to keep an eye on it to see when it's done baking.





Thanks thumbs_up.gif thumbs_up.gif

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carterl Posted 5 Oct 2005 , 5:58pm
post #12 of 37

Hi Maria. I have used soup cans and thinner cans when I make castle cakes. All you need to do is clean and dry the cans well before use. Then I use Pam Spray to coat them and fill them about 1/2 full with the cake batter. Bake the cake at 350 degrees and check at 20 minutes or so for doneness. Let them cool for 10 minutes, then I use a thin spatula to ream them a bit before I flip the cake out. For the larger coffee can, I believe wax paper would be best to prevent sticking. Good luck!

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Kiddiekakes Posted 5 Oct 2005 , 6:09pm
post #13 of 37

I have used large coffee cans to bake my granny's Easter bread called Paska...she is polish.It is wonderful!!!

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MariaLovesCakes Posted 5 Oct 2005 , 7:46pm
post #14 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by carterl

Hi Maria. I have used soup cans and thinner cans when I make castle cakes. All you need to do is clean and dry the cans well before use. Then I use Pam Spray to coat them and fill them about 1/2 full with the cake batter. Bake the cake at 350 degrees and check at 20 minutes or so for doneness. Let them cool for 10 minutes, then I use a thin spatula to ream them a bit before I flip the cake out. For the larger coffee can, I believe wax paper would be best to prevent sticking. Good luck!




Thank you, everyone for all the responses!!! I can wait to try it!!!

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adven68 Posted 5 Oct 2005 , 8:01pm
post #15 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiddiekakes

I have used large coffee cans to bake my granny's Easter bread called Paska...she is polish.It is wonderful!!!




Just FYI..."Paska" (actually Pascha) is the Greek word for Easter.

I find this fascinating....and innovating....and inexpensive! How awesome an idea to use cans. I am going to try it tonight!

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Mac Posted 5 Oct 2005 , 10:35pm
post #16 of 37

I bake the tuna cans at 325 degrees and check after 15 minutes. Coffee can at 350.

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mvigil Posted 5 Oct 2005 , 10:45pm
post #17 of 37

Thanks so much thumbs_up.gif

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chyna Posted 17 Oct 2005 , 7:35pm
post #18 of 37

I want to try this for a penguin cake, but the can is painted on the outside (From the coffee company)

Do I need to pretreat it at all? Or is that paint ok? They don't have labels, the logo etc is printed right on the metal.

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bonniesido Posted 17 Oct 2005 , 9:40pm
post #19 of 37

I have never tried this myself but, I did see a show on Food Network where they were baking with a can. They cut both ends of the can out, greased and floured the inside of the can. Then they placed it on a cookie sheet and poured the cake batter in the can. They baked at a lower temp and when it was done the can came right off! I may give it a try. If I do I'll let you know what happens!

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chyna Posted 17 Oct 2005 , 10:08pm
post #20 of 37

I have a coffee can cake in the oven right now....I put the can into the oven to see what hte paint would do and it didn't darken or change, or smell, so I went ahead.
I will report!

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good36 Posted 17 Oct 2005 , 10:45pm
post #21 of 37

We always used soup cans for bannana bread when I was young. Never for a cake but why not? There are so many shaped cans out there, what a great thought. Thank you!
Judy

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tinascakes Posted 17 Oct 2005 , 10:52pm
post #22 of 37

I am so glad this topic has come up. This is something I have been thinking about trying for quite awhile but haven't dared!!!

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chyna Posted 17 Oct 2005 , 11:03pm
post #23 of 37

my reply didnt' seem to show up...

The cake came out fine, used cake release recipe from this site. Calculated volume with water before hand, but didn't use enough batter (no worries, making another layer)

seems to work well.

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pkcakes Posted 17 Oct 2005 , 11:17pm
post #24 of 37

Marialosvescakes,
This is a great idea!, but I don't know how you use a cake baked in a soup can to make a tree. Could you share with me, please?

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MariaLovesCakes Posted 18 Oct 2005 , 2:55pm
post #25 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by pkcakes

Marialosvescakes,
This is a great idea!, but I don't know how you use a cake baked in a soup can to make a tree. Could you share with me, please?




Great everyone!!!!! I am glad this is turning up to be a good topic for us to find innovative ways of using our soup cans..


pkcakes: I am planning to use the shape of soup can to make the trunk of the tree. I am baking two soup cans and stack them on top of each other. I will trim if they are too tall. I will also get a long dowel rod to go thru the middle to give it stability and anker it onto the cake. Then, I will decorate it with icing to make it look like a tree.

I will also make brances and leaves...

This is going to be the hallow tree where Miss Spider and her Sunny Patch kids live just like in the Nick Jr cartoon... That's my duaghter's theme.

I already made Miss Spider out of Marshmallow fondant and three of her bug kids...

I am making this cake at the end of this month.

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pkcakes Posted 19 Oct 2005 , 5:47pm
post #26 of 37

Oh! thank you. I'll love to see your cake. icon_biggrin.gif

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chyna Posted 19 Oct 2005 , 7:17pm
post #27 of 37

as I said in another thread, next time I do it, I'm going to put a metal skewer down the middle (like one of those heating cores)....any comments on that? I've not used one before....

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Chef_Mommy Posted 1 Nov 2005 , 2:54am
post #28 of 37

as I said in another thread, next time I do it, I'm going to put a metal skewer down the middle (like one of those heating cores)....any comments on that? I've not used one before....[quote]

Thats was what I was going to ask. Will the cake bake in the middle if I used a coffee can? Should I put anything in to act ask a heating core? I was just thinking if this was like the 3d bear pan then maybe it will need one. Please let me know the correct way.

Thanks

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chyna Posted 1 Nov 2005 , 5:25am
post #29 of 37

my cake DID cook in the middle, but I think a core of some kind would have improved it. And I will probably use a "lighter" recipe next time.

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cande Posted 1 Nov 2005 , 1:02pm
post #30 of 37

Homemade core?

Is there a way to make a homemade core, or is there somewhere that sells just the core?

Here in Europe, I have found that many home bakers use metal rings (no top or bottom) that they simply place on a baking sheet and fill (they come in lots of shapes and are almost always expandable/adjustable)...the method that was mentioned as being seen on TV where they cut the top and bottom of the can out reminded me of this. But, the ones here aren't as tall as a coffee can...perhaps 6-8 inches tall, max.

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