How About A Thread To Seriously Discuss Chocolate Making?!?

Sugar Work By sayhellojana Updated 5 Oct 2011 , 1:33am by SpatulaGoddess

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leahk Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 4:32pm
post #31 of 883
Quote:
Originally Posted by mkolmar

*For those who are reading this thread and want to start chocolate making, but don't know how to temper. I'll be typing up all of the tempering things you need to know and placing it here on CC. A chocolate 101 if you will icon_lol.gif Anyways, I've had lots of members ask me about tempering, so I just thought I'd make it easier and post it here on CC instead. I'll make sure to go into more detail though so it will be LONG.



WOW! How did you know that was what I was going to ask for?!?!?
Thanks in advance!

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Kiddiekakes Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 4:36pm
post #32 of 883

I wouldn't mind getting some recipes also for fillings etc..I have alot of molds already but never seem to use them!! I'm not sure about in the US but here in Canada there is a wonderful chocolatier that makes purely divine confections named Bernard Callebaut...his main factory is right here in Calgary..Every birthday or Christmas etc hubby buys me a big box of chocolates ..about $80.00 and they are usually gone in 2 days!!! Just Heaven!!

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mbelgard Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 4:40pm
post #33 of 883

I have an addiction to candy molds. icon_lol.gif

I know how to temper but I don't do it often, my kids think that melts taste wonderful and if I don't make candy for them out of real chocolate I don't eat it. icon_twisted.gif That's if the real chocolate would even last long enough to be molded. I'm also lazy so tempering is only done for special stuff. icon_wink.gif

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jojo0676 Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 4:40pm
post #34 of 883

I am definitely up for a chocolate making thread. I have been making all kinds of chocolates since I was a kid. I like to do molded chocolates. At Easter, I make a ton, all of my DD's basket fillings are homemade. And, I make a huge bunny for DH each year. I would like to make more for the winter holidays, especially truffles. A pumpkin truffle recipe would be wonderful. And, I would love a peppermint truffle recipe too for Christmas. I really like the Ghirardelli truffle recipe from Food Netowrk. I add some Lorann oils to it and use it to a coated mold, yummy! I was planning on doing that for the peppermint truffle, unless anyone has a good one they like.

Here's the recipe if anyone's interested

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/food-network-challenge/ghirardelli-sinful-chocolate-truffles-recipe/index.html

I like to use a mix of bittersweet and semi-sweet chocolate, for a little extra sweetness icon_smile.gif

Looking forward to lots of yummy chocolate ideas!

Mary Jo

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cmp24 Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 4:53pm
post #35 of 883
Quote:
Originally Posted by sayhellojana

Humm. The only one;s I've seen are these (http://www.perpetualkid.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=1326) and they are made for ice. BUT, it's a rubber/silicone mold, so it will probably be ok to use with chocolate






Thanks, those are the ones i've found also, but don't know if I can use the hard candy in them also.

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cmp24 Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 4:55pm
post #36 of 883
Quote:
Originally Posted by staceyboots

I'M IN...I'M IN!!!!!

I am definitely a newbie when it comes to the art of chocolate making. Any tips for a beginner? I am guessing that the best place to start is learning how to make a simple chocolate truffle??!!

What is the best chocolate for melting? Can I just melt store-bought chocolate (like Lindt or Cadbury) and use that to fill molds?






I use the almond bark white or chocolate to do all my candy dipping it. This year i'm going to try the cake balls. They sound pretty interesting to make.

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Lenette Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 5:02pm
post #37 of 883

I am all for it! I have wanted to learn all I can about chocolates and candy making for years now. I have made truffles rolled in cocoa, peanut brittle, and fudge (once).

I do a lot of reading on the net and would love to share ideas and such. I want to learn to temper before years end. I actually bought a machine but over a year later it is still in the box icon_redface.gif .

Tempering scares me; tempering and pie crust. icon_cry.gif

Hoping to overcome these fears one at a time. This will be fun, great thread!

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Pastry-Panda Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 5:02pm
post #38 of 883

I LOVE CHOCOLATE!!

I started making hademade truffles a few years ago , and I love it!!

I don't really care for tempering chocolate though , I'm hoping to get a tempering machine in the future so I will be more motivated to make molded truffles.

I have this book called "truffles candies and confections" by Carole Bloom , I love this book!! It has tons of great recipes

My favorite so far is the candied orange peel truffles , OH they are sooooo good. The candied orange peel tastes just like those gummi orange slices coated with sugar. I also really enjoy the butter peanut brittle recipe and then I dip the pieces halfway in chocolate , yum!!

I think I just like to put chocolate on everything , especially homemade marshmallows with a bit of flavored oil in it.

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cmp24 Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 5:05pm
post #39 of 883

I have never tried molds for candy. The molds I have, have way to much detail and i would not know where to start on them. I have one it's santa in a sleigh and reindeer lollis. Not even going to attempt it! No idea where I got it from either. I just don't know where to start or how to do a small candy mold.

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CakesByLJ Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 5:06pm
post #40 of 883

Oh fiddlesticks... you are going to love her methods for making the whipped cream and ganache truffles.. so easy to follow, and so dang melt in your mouth good thumbs_up.gif I have made most of her recipes in the book (after having gone to two of her classes), and my favorites are the mocha and caramel. Best part is they sell every thing you need in their website..
I have a candy mold fetish too.. icon_redface.gif but I am glad I collected them over the years, because now I use them for fondant molds... thumbs_up.gif

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Lenette Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 5:13pm
post #41 of 883

Oh, I was just going to recommend that book by Carole Bloom and Candymaking by Ruth Kendrick.

There is also lots of good reading at egullet.com under the pastry and baking forum. Great candy info- truly a wealth of knowledge!

You can also find lots of good stuff on blogs, I don't know if I bookmarked any but I'll see.

The book I am dying off for is by Peter Greweling from the CIA- Chocolates and Confections. It seems a little intimidating but I know of novices who have tackled recipes from there with success.

I recently found DVD's on candy making on the CIA website but they are a little pricey at $200 for the set. But it is cheaper for me that taking classes so they are still on my list!

Has anyone heard anything about the online chocolate program at ecolechocolat.com?
I dream of taking that course since I don't live anywhere near a school where I could take classes.

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jojo0676 Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 5:16pm
post #42 of 883

Pastry-panda,
Would you be willing to share the recipe for candied orange truffles. I loved chocolate coated candy orange peels. These sound wonderful.

Thanks,
Mary Jo

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cmp24 Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 5:17pm
post #43 of 883

ok stupid questions::::

1. what is tempering chocolate?

2. I found a mold just now going through some of my candy stuff and it's like a big reeses cup mold.....anyone know of a pb recipe i can put in it? or strawberry, or cherry? Or would strawberry or cherry work in it?

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mkolmar Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 5:47pm
post #44 of 883

I bought the quilt one and then the whole set of contemporary molds. It's not a cheap plastic but not the thickest plastic I've seen with molds either. Still pretty decent quality though. Eventually one day I'd like to buy silicone molds for the chocolates....a girl can dream can't she. icon_wink.gif

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mkolmar Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 5:49pm
post #45 of 883

I bought the quilt one and then the whole set of contemporary molds. It's not a cheap plastic but not the thickest plastic I've seen with molds either. Still pretty decent quality though. Eventually one day I'd like to buy silicone molds for the chocolates....a girl can dream can't she. icon_wink.gif

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CakesByLJ Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 6:07pm
post #46 of 883
Quote:
Originally Posted by mkolmar

I bought the quilt one and then the whole set of contemporary molds. It's not a cheap plastic but not the thickest plastic I've seen with molds either. Still pretty decent quality though. Eventually one day I'd like to buy silicone molds for the chocolates....a girl can dream can't she. icon_wink.gif




mkolmar.. I have never used the silicone molds, so I don't know how they work.. but the old standard plastic ones give the chocolate it's nice shiny finish, and I like that! But, I have invested in some commercial hard molds and really love them; but they are pricey. I first started using them when Jacques Torres had his series of shows on PBS.. he is eye candy for sure...... thumbs_up.gif thumbs_up.gif thumbs_up.gif

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paolacaracas Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 6:10pm
post #47 of 883
Quote:
Originally Posted by playingwithsugar

Girlfriend -

I do it all, cake, cookies, pastry, chocolate! In fact, I was just at the French Culinary Institute last Saturday, for a demo in Chocolate Sculpting. Very interesting, and can't wait to get the materials to do a couple of centerpieces/serving pieces for the holidays.Theresa icon_smile.gif



I was there too!! remember someone made a comment about venezuelan regions? That was me...and sitting behind me RON BEN ISRAEL, my favorite cake designer.

The only thing I really need to take a full class in is hot sugar. I've played with it before, but there is always something to learn, no matter how much experience you have.
I agree this is the one thing is better not learn by your self. I take the class with Ewald Notter, he is the best for sugar.




The books I like the most is Andrew Shotts's, I think the flavors are modern and the size of the recipes is just good for amateur chocolate making.
The best site for chocolate supply is www.jbprince.com, I think if you are going to get serious about chocolate, plastic candy molds are not goon enough, you'll need the good polycarbonate hard ones.
There are pictures of some of the chocolates I've made in my web page.
Now I'm working on a little gift box for Christmas that will have peppermint, egg nog, and cinnamon bonbons, with Christmas chocolate transfers. I'll post a picture when I'm done.

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mkolmar Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 6:40pm
post #48 of 883

Good to know CakesbyLJ. Thanks. I'm really in a pastry and chocolate kick right now. Cakes are kind of not a priority right now for me (please don't yell). I've been focusing on these other things a lot more lately.
I was at the World Pastry Forum and I got to peek in and see a lot of silicon mold that the pro's were using. They also make their own molds too. I almost took the chocolate class but decided the cake class was more important. The talent in their was unbelievable.

I've been mainly doing hand dipped chocolates but I want to get a prettier looking chocolate so I'm going to be attempting the molds later for the truffles that look like triangles and other designs. Wish me luck! I'll probably fill them with marzipan for my DH and carmel or flavored ganache for the kids. (Did I mention I'm on a diet and this is sooooo not what I need to be making right now icon_lol.gif )
I think I need to buy the books mentioned and get to some serious candy making for the next few weeks. I have a large event that each table will have chocolates at (someone's idea that I'm now having to do). I really want this to go well since I'm in charge of the dessert station. I'm stressed already and it's not for another few months.

It's pricey but so with it for anyone interested. The World Pastry Forum has lots of classes that go on for 5 days. Next year is in AZ and will be in the beginning of July. I'm going to see if I'm qualified enough to be a chefs assistant with the pastries and hopefully learn some more by watching and helping the other students.

I can't remember who asked it (sorry) but tempering chocolate is important because if you don't and you just melt it, the chocolate will not set and will be sticky and kind of soft. It also will be a royal pain and is very difficult to handle when trying to un-mold or do chocolate work.

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bobwonderbuns Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 6:47pm
post #49 of 883

Oh no, not another 90,000 page thread!! icon_rolleyes.gif icon_biggrin.gif

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mkolmar Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 6:57pm
post #50 of 883

Oh yeah, we are heading there bobwonderbuns! icon_lol.gif

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sweetjane Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 7:24pm
post #51 of 883

Okay, I just had to jump in here too. I have taken classes from Joe Bushnell (who started my addiction) then went to Steven Stellingwerf and then jumped to Ewald Notter in Orlando.
Joe Bushnell was a great instructor and gave some fabulous recipes, including a pumpkin spice that is great for the fall holidays.
From Steven, a wonderful book called "Oh Truffles!" can sometimes be found on Ebay for a reasonable price.
But Mr Notter was the epitome of all things chocolate. The polycarbonate molds are the only way to go if you want a shiny, professional-ooking piece. You can airbrush cocoa butter (in any color) into the molds and make a design if you wish; put your chocolate in and then fill. What a wonder chocolate is......

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sweetjane Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 7:25pm
post #52 of 883

Okay, I just had to jump in here too. I have taken classes from Joe Bushnell (who started my addiction) then went to Steven Stellingwerf and then jumped to Ewald Notter in Orlando.
Joe Bushnell was a great instructor and gave some fabulous recipes, including a pumpkin spice that is great for the fall holidays.
From Steven, a wonderful book called "Oh Truffles!" can sometimes be found on Ebay for a reasonable price.
But Mr Notter was the epitome of all things chocolate. The polycarbonate molds are the only way to go if you want a shiny, professional-ooking piece. You can airbrush cocoa butter (in any color) into the molds and make a design if you wish; put your chocolate in and then fill. What a wonder chocolate is......

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sayhellojana Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 7:41pm
post #53 of 883

Tempering is difficult to do at-home. You need to have enough seed crystals for the chocolate to harden with that pretty sheen. The easiest way, for me, is to melt half of my chocolate over a double broiler, take it off the heat, and stir in the rest of the chocolate that has been chopped up real fine. Chocolate is sold already tempered, so adding the chocolate at the end provides the seed crystals.
I very, very rares just make chocolate for fun. Usually, I'll spend a day or two and just make tons! It's easier for me this way because I can temper one big pot of chocolate and use that for shells, take a little out here and there to flavor it, etc.
I just use cheap plastic molds and so far I haven't had any problems. The plastic on my molds is thicker than Wiltons, thank god. Just don't put them in the dishwasher, made that mistake once.
Good to know the World Pastry Forum will be in AZ, I'll deffinantly have to look into that. I've never taken classes, just learned by trial and error, so that would be a welcomed change icon_smile.gif
Oh, and usually I buy the 10lbs blocks of ghirardelli chocolate. I don't have a Costco membership, but I do have a lovely aunt that lets me use hers, so if you have access to costco or Sam's, deffinantly check there. I get them for between 8-10 dollars, just depending on the season. Tastes lovely too!
AND, I'd like to add that I just purchased a whole mess of LorAnn oils on eBay, all new, unopened, and way less expensive than regular price. The economy is hard, but I'm trying to make due, you know?
I'm going to have a chocolate making spree as soon as my molds get in. For Thanksgiving/Harvest and such. Nothing like a slice of pumpkin pie with a truffle to wash it down, am I right!?

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playingwithsugar Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 8:00pm
post #54 of 883

Ooh, homemade marshmallow. It's like eating a sweet cloud. Now you're making me hungry for coconut marshmallows.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

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sayhellojana Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 8:05pm
post #55 of 883

coconut marshmallows...MMM, sounds wonderful! Ohh, now, what if you were to put a little bit of coconut oil in the chocolate and the marshmallow center...
Guess I have to try that, too icon_smile.gif Thanks for the idea playingwithsugar, lol.

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playingwithsugar Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 8:10pm
post #56 of 883

Maybe, but I'm talking about toasting the coconut, then covering the marshmallow with it. Then, when you cut it and pull it out of the pan, you cover all the other sides with it.

It's so good. Yes, I know you can buy coconut marshmallows in the store, but once you've tasted homemade marshmallow, the store-bought once pale by comparison, even the most fresh ones you can find.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

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sayhellojana Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 8:11pm
post #57 of 883

Oh. That sounds really good too. I agree with the homemade marshmallows, much, much better. Softer, they melt in your mouth icon_smile.gif

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fiddlesticks Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 8:29pm
post #58 of 883

I have never had/made homemade marshmallow.

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fiddlesticks Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 8:30pm
post #59 of 883

I have never had/made homemade marshmallow.

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playingwithsugar Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 8:38pm
post #60 of 883

Fiddle - you don't know what you are missing.

They're not as difficult as some people make it seem. If you can make IMBC, you can make marshmallows. The taste and texture are incredible. Imagine biting into something almost as soft as a cotton ball, it melting in your mouth like sweet & soft butter.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

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