I'm Going To Cry! These Seams Are Killing Me.

Decorating By Rylan Updated 15 Apr 2011 , 12:38am by Rylan

Rylan Posted 5 Aug 2010 , 11:14am
post #1 of 13

I'm covering a 5 tier square cake using fondant (with tylose) panels. This is the second attempt because I wanted it to have a clean 360 view. But now, I can't get a seamless look. I don't know how to make these seams (where panels meet) look clean. I tried spackling it with royal icing but it doesn't look clean. I don't want to use dilluted fondant because I'm afraid it might ruin it. Ugh, is there any way I can have a clean seam? Any ideas?

12 replies
cheatize Posted 5 Aug 2010 , 1:49pm
post #2 of 13

I wasn't going to mention this until I tried it myself, but here goes:

I was struggling with fondant one day and got desperate. I grabbed a hair dryer and my palette knife with a metal blade. I shot heat on the seams and the tears while smoothing it with the knife. I didn't work perfectly but at least it gave me hope.

I'm not comfortable using a hair dryer as I know how much of my hair and dust gets into it, so I bought one of those tiny craft irons at Joann Fabrics. I couldn't find one at Hobby Lobby or Michaels. I used a 40% off coupon, but it's still pricey something so small. I haven't had the chance to try it yet but I'm hoping it will work even better than the hair dryer. The tiny size of the head means I can get into smaller areas and the heat will be either directly applied or I may place a food safe barrier between the iron and the cake- it depends on how it goes. Additionally, I won't be blowing God know what onto the cake.

Only for you, Rylan, would I admit my attempts at fixing fondant like this. I don't know if it the best idea ever or really stupid. LOL

erin12345 Posted 5 Aug 2010 , 2:14pm
post #3 of 13

I don't have any experience with fondant panels but if you're looking for another heat source, you could try a heat gun that's used for embossing cards and scrapbooking projects. Available at any craft store. It is much smaller than a hair dryer and you can aim it at a specific area. Just a thought. Good luck.

TexasSugar Posted 5 Aug 2010 , 2:16pm
post #4 of 13

Could you put something over the? Like a "ribbon" of fondant done it that folds evening on both sides, or even a rope that covers the seams?

jjkarm Posted 5 Aug 2010 , 3:31pm
post #5 of 13

I use thinned fondant. I know you said you didn't want to try this, but I've found it works better than anything else.... the color match is always perfect. If you're worried about it leaving a shine, rub a little shortening over the entire surface of the fondant. I'd suggest trying this with some left over fondant and see how it looks. Good luck!

dchockeyguy Posted 5 Aug 2010 , 3:44pm
post #6 of 13

Can you just make a piece to cover it? Like an extra covering on the corners? If I were at home, I'd send you ssome pictures of some ideas of doing that which look pretty nice.

sillywabbitz Posted 5 Aug 2010 , 3:46pm
post #7 of 13

When I did the wine cake, I used melted chocolate and ran my finger over it to smooth it out and it worked really well. This would be hard to match if you used a unique color fondant. SugarShack uses the royal and then runs her finger over it to remove the excess and hers look seriously perfect.

How are you removing the excess Royal?

honeyscakes Posted 5 Aug 2010 , 4:00pm
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by sillywabbitz

When I did the wine cake, I used melted chocolate and ran my finger over it to smooth it out and it worked really well. This would be hard to match if you used a unique color fondant. SugarShack uses the royal and then runs her finger over it to remove the excess and hers look seriously perfect.

How are you removing the excess Royal?



YUP! that's what I was going to suggest...candy melts.
GOOD LUCK RYLAN!!! I know you got this one! thumbs_up.gif
- h

vagostino Posted 5 Aug 2010 , 6:56pm
post #9 of 13

My advice will probably be useless since you are so talented, but here it goes anyways... First I would make sure that the panels are cut exactly so they cover the length of the cake, plus the thickness of the panel that is going to be on the immediate side. Then, I would get a tip #1 with stiff royal icing and I would pipe right in the seam and wipe the excess.
In my mind that will yield a pretty good seam, and your work is so clean always that I have no doubt you can pull it off!

Rylan Posted 5 Aug 2010 , 8:18pm
post #10 of 13

Hi everyone, thanks for all your tips! Unfortunately, the panels are half dry and so I can no longer blend the seams together--even if I warm it up.

I'll try the candy melts and thinned fondant and hopefully it works. As for the royal icing, I apply it as if I would spackle a wall (and scrape it off). It doesn't look clean. The panels perfectly fit together, it's just that the seams bother me. I was thinking of hiding them but I have no idea how without dramatically changing the design.

greengyrl26 Posted 5 Aug 2010 , 8:59pm
post #11 of 13

Not to hijack your thread Rylan (LOVE your work btw!), but...

What is "thinned fondant", how do you get/make it & what's it used for? Very curious about this!

jjkarm Posted 5 Aug 2010 , 9:15pm
post #12 of 13

You can make thinned fondant by mixing a small amount of fondant with either shortening or water. I put it in the palm of my hand and "smush" it together until I get a thick paste consistency. Using your finger, fill in the seam with paste and smooth it out. I use it to fill in seams or small cracks. It's always worked very well for me. HTH thumbs_up.gif

Rylan Posted 15 Apr 2011 , 12:38am
post #13 of 13

Thanks so much for all the tips! I did try all suggestions and it seems like that a better version of royal icing worked. There are some seams but not very visible (after tons of work).

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