Kicking Myself!!!

Business By lissyUK Updated 30 Jun 2010 , 1:35pm by aundrea

lissyUK Posted 27 Jun 2010 , 8:56pm
post #1 of 37

I've only just started selling my cakes, so am not quite as savvy as i need to be. Today i got screwed!

I delivered a cake today. All fine, client very pleased. She handed me a fold of cash and i, STUPIDLY, said thanks and put it in my pocket. I saw a few £20s and a £10 and thought that's nice, she's given me a £5 tip.

NOPE. when i checked when i was back in my car, she'd only given me £90 instead of £105! I'm absolutely sure she didn't deliberately short change me, I know her well and she's lovely. She'd be mortified if she realised. I'm just gutted that i worked really hard on a cake on the hottest day of the year and got paid £15 less than i should have on a cake i'd already discounted!

So, Next time, I'm printing out a receipt and saying, That's £XXX to pay.

Still made money on it, but gutted i was so silly!

ANyway just need to share my stupidity with people who might understand! Cake below.
http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1722588

36 replies
mamawrobin Posted 27 Jun 2010 , 9:04pm
post #2 of 37

Cute cake. A lot of people require full payment BEFORE they turn the oven on to bake the cake. If you did that you'd be certain that this would never happen again. ...sorry that this happened to you...did you not say anything to the customer about there not being enough money?

lissyUK Posted 27 Jun 2010 , 9:07pm
post #3 of 37

I usually get a decent deposit and get final payment in advance. But I know her well, so didn't. Will every time from now on!

Need to be more confident about the money side and check how much i'm given rather than worrying about looking mercenary! Need to remind myself it's a business now, not doing people favours...!

mamawrobin Posted 27 Jun 2010 , 9:28pm
post #4 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by lissyUK

I usually get a decent deposit and get final payment in advance. But I know her well, so didn't. Will every time from now on!

Need to be more confident about the money side and check how much i'm given rather than worrying about looking mercenary! Need to remind myself it's a business now, not doing people favours...!




Yes you do thumbs_up.gif I bet this won't happen to you again. Thank goodness it was just $15.00. It will get easier as you do more cakes. thumbs_up.gif

Melvira Posted 27 Jun 2010 , 9:59pm
post #5 of 37

You know, I have the same sort of feeling like you seem to. I don't like to count in front of people when they pay me in cash because I feel like I'm saying I don't trust them to give me the right amount. icon_redface.gif I know that's not what it means, and it's only GOOD SENSE to count it right there in front of them, so I usually just quickly glance at it. But it still makes me feel weird. Something I have been working to get over. icon_rolleyes.gif

Dayti Posted 27 Jun 2010 , 11:03pm
post #6 of 37

That happened to me once, also with a good friend, because I also felt uncomfortable counting the cash in front of her. She'd underpaid me by about 40 or something on a total of about 200. I eventually sent her a quick email and told her exactly the notes she'd given me (I didn't want her to think I was lying). She was mortified as your friend might be, but she straight away asked for my bank account and did a transfer, so it was all sorted. But it was quite a horrible situation. I decided to do it because I didn't want to feel cheated out of my work, and I'm glad I did, and she was glad I did too! She has ordered from me since, so no hard feelings from either of us.

tokazodo Posted 27 Jun 2010 , 11:14pm
post #7 of 37

I always feel like I break even. How many times has an added tip been thrown in on other cake orders?
Which is more important? The cash or the friendship?

What really burns my buns is when I do a cake for free, as a gift, and don't even get a 'Thank You'.

That's just down right wrong.


Karma Baby!
icon_wink.gificon_wink.gif

Doug Posted 27 Jun 2010 , 11:14pm
post #8 of 37

thanks to year's working drug store deliver (where that money bag had to balance to the penny!)

and now many years as yearbook adviser

and church treasurer....

NO qualms about counting money in front of them and then marking invoice paid in full (or issuing a receipt)

It's PROPER business practice. And for many of us this IS a business.

tokazodo Posted 28 Jun 2010 , 12:02am
post #9 of 37

Doug is right. It is proper business practice. It will make us appear more professional.

lissyUK Posted 28 Jun 2010 , 12:07am
post #10 of 37

You're all absolutely right! I know I handled it wrong- at least I've learned my lesson. Could have been a much more expensive lesson! Friendship is more important than the money - have no intention of mentioning it. Just really annoyed at myself! Still has prompted me to sort out the paperwork side better!

Oh and when I said I made money, I mean I paid myself minimum wage or so! So much to learn in this business!!!

BlakesCakes Posted 28 Jun 2010 , 1:51am
post #11 of 37

I'm sorry, but I don't understand WHY this has to be any sort of "lesson" icon_confused.gif

Why not call or e-mail this "lovely woman", whom you "know well" and explain what happened, asking when you can stop bye to pick up the remainder?????

If it was the honest mistake that you believe it was, then she'll apologize and gladly turn over the extra cash. I'd certainly want someone to tell ME if I did this..............

If it was a deliberate act, then she'll be angry, or at the very least doubtful, and who cares because who wants a customer who would do something like that, anyway icon_twisted.gif

Had it been me--and I never count the $ in front of someone, either--when I checked in the car, I'd have walked back, showed the wad of money to her, and waited until she forked $ over.

Once, someone gave me too much cash---and I drove back (just a block) to return it to her................

I refuse to be ANYONE'S victim
Rae

Doug Posted 28 Jun 2010 , 2:08am
post #12 of 37

why count in the car?

what delivery person does that?

you count in front of the customer -- just like in ANY store, in ANY BUSINESS transaction.

Nothing hidden!

BlakesCakes Posted 28 Jun 2010 , 2:18am
post #13 of 37

Well, maybe it's just a "girl" thing.................or maybe it's my old waitressing days when we were NOT to count money at the table in front of the customer....errors were taken care of by the cashier, only.

I choose not to do it when I'm standing in someone's home making small talk with them. It "feels" rude and somewhat distrustful. Maybe that's "wrong", but for me, it's the way I prefer.

That said, I DO count it on the way to the car or as my DH drives off of the property and errors are rectified immediately.

Rae

DetailsByDawn Posted 28 Jun 2010 , 2:28am
post #14 of 37

Count. Always count. If you're undercut, you can correct it right there. If they've overpaid, you can offer change. How would you feel if you drove home and realised someone overpaid by $15.... Maybe they were expecting change and you just took the money and left and they felt awkward about asking you for their money back. Take away all the stress. Visualise the counter and till in front of you. Count the money, hand them their invoice and/or change and wish them a lovely party.

newmansmom2004 Posted 28 Jun 2010 , 2:32am
post #15 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by DetailsByDawn

Count. Always count. If you're undercut, you can correct it right there. If they've overpaid, you can offer change. How would you feel if you drove home and realised someone overpaid by $15.... Maybe they were expecting change and you just took the money and left and they felt awkward about asking you for their money back. Take away all the stress. Visualise the counter and till in front of you. Count the money, hand them their invoice and/or change and wish them a lovely party.





Exactly what I was going to say - count it in front of them and if you feel uncomfortable say something like, "Let me just make sure I don't owe you any change back." If the amount is correct, mark the invoice paid and hand it to the customer. People make honest mistakes and if you've been shortchanged just say "Thank you so much but let me count again because I counted short the first time." It doesn't have to be a big deal and you should get paid the full amount, mistake or not.

Doug Posted 28 Jun 2010 , 2:35am
post #16 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

Well, maybe it's just a "girl" thing.................or maybe it's my old waitressing days when we were NOT to count money at the table in front of the customer....errors were taken care of by the cashier, only.

I choose not to do it when I'm standing in someone's home making small talk with them. It "feels" rude and somewhat distrustful. Maybe that's "wrong", but for me, it's the way I prefer.

That said, I DO count it on the way to the car or as my DH drives off of the property and errors are rectified immediately.

Rae




interesting -- wait staff taught not to count in front of customer, delivery people taught they should.

(of course when I went to Europe, the waitstaff DID count in front of customer and made change on the spot -- felt so sorry for them having to wear those big money aprons with all those coins!)

moral - COUNT either in front or before you drive off

cutthecake Posted 28 Jun 2010 , 2:40am
post #17 of 37

If you DON'T count in front of the customer, and they short-changed you, they could accuse you of stealing money or lying about the amount you received.

adonisthegreek1 Posted 28 Jun 2010 , 2:54am
post #18 of 37

Since she didn't count in front of this customer whom she knows so well, I would let the difference slide. I would not ask for more, because I failed to count it on the spot. From now on though, I'd count on the spot.

BlakesCakes Posted 28 Jun 2010 , 2:55am
post #19 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by cutthecake

If you DON'T count in front of the customer, and they short-changed you, they could accuse you of stealing money or lying about the amount you received.




And then you give them back the money and take the cake to the nearest homelss shelter, fire department, police department, Ronald McDonald House............. icon_twisted.gif

And, yes, I'd do exactly that in a heartbeat!

Rae

Cakepro Posted 28 Jun 2010 , 3:25am
post #20 of 37

Actually, the OP said she was shorted £15, which is about $22.50 USD.

Doug Posted 28 Jun 2010 , 11:03pm
post #21 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

Quote:
Originally Posted by cutthecake

If you DON'T count in front of the customer, and they short-changed you, they could accuse you of stealing money or lying about the amount you received.



And then you give them back the money and take the cake to the nearest homelss shelter, fire department, police department, Ronald McDonald House............. icon_twisted.gif

And, yes, I'd do exactly that in a heartbeat!

Rae




ah, but if the cake is already in the house...

then they could have you arrested for trespassing and if you forced your way in assault and possibly breaking and entering.

I vote for transparency -- count in front of the customer -- this is a delivery situation, not a restaurant situation.

Donnabugg Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 2:10am
post #22 of 37

I work at a bank and I'd say less than 5% of the people actually count the money I give them. I know it feels awkward because I feel the same way BUT I can tell you I have more respect for those customers that do count the money.

I like the idea about counting it then having them sign the delivery receipt...it does look more professional.

littlecake Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 2:20am
post #23 of 37

oh good grief.....they need a sale on big girl panties.

Donnabugg Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 2:25am
post #24 of 37

I work at a bank and I'd say less than 5% of the people actually count the money I give them. I know it feels awkward because I feel the same way BUT I can tell you I have more respect for those customers that do count the money.

I like the idea about counting it then having them sign the delivery receipt...it does look more professional.

lissyUK Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 7:34am
post #25 of 37

Thanks for all the helpful replies. As i said in the original post, i'm very aware that i made a mistake.

emrldsky Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 12:34pm
post #26 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Donnabugg

I work at a bank and I'd say less than 5% of the people actually count the money I give them. I know it feels awkward because I feel the same way BUT I can tell you I have more respect for those customers that do count the money.

I like the idea about counting it then having them sign the delivery receipt...it does look more professional.




I usually count along with the bank teller, if I'm in the bank. If I'm in the drive-thru, I count before I leave. icon_smile.gif Maybe people count along with you too?

To the OP, you do what you feel is right here, but overall, I think you've gotten some great advice on how to prevent potential situations like this from happening in the future. Good luck!

Solecito Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 6:46pm
post #27 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by DetailsByDawn

Count. Always count. If you're undercut, you can correct it right there. If they've overpaid, you can offer change. How would you feel if you drove home and realised someone overpaid by $15.... Maybe they were expecting change and you just took the money and left and they felt awkward about asking you for their money back. Take away all the stress. Visualise the counter and till in front of you. Count the money, hand them their invoice and/or change and wish them a lovely party.




That's right!
You have to count to know if you owe change...

KHalstead Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 7:05pm
post #28 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by DetailsByDawn

Count. Always count. If you're undercut, you can correct it right there. If they've overpaid, you can offer change. How would you feel if you drove home and realised someone overpaid by $15.... Maybe they were expecting change and you just took the money and left and they felt awkward about asking you for their money back. Take away all the stress. Visualise the counter and till in front of you. Count the money, hand them their invoice and/or change and wish them a lovely party.





I had THIS scenario happen before..........woman ordered a cake, I quoted her $90 for everything and said that didn't count deliver (she didn't know the address for delivery at the time).........then when it came closer to the date, she let me know the address and it was 35 miles away I told her $1.00/mile one way...so her total is now $125.

I delivered the cake, she handed me a handfull of bills folded in half...I said "Oh thanks...I hope your party is a success" and she gave me a weird look and said......."Oh...well..........don't you have change for me?" I felt terrible!! I was like.........ohhhh.....I'm sorry............then I counted the money in front of her, it was $100 even (5-$20 bills)....I said........."oh....well, actually the total is $125"

Then she said, "Oh...ok, then that should be fine...you can keep it all!" icon_surprised.gificon_surprised.gif and she walked away with the cake and I've never heard from her again!!

She was a coworker of my mom's so I didn't require payment up front (which I normally do on orders over $100), my mom was SO mortified that this woman would do that, that my MOM paid me the additional $25 while shaking her head saying...."that's just not right!" lol

cownsj Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 8:32pm
post #29 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by emrldsky

Quote:
Originally Posted by Donnabugg

I work at a bank and I'd say less than 5% of the people actually count the money I give them. I know it feels awkward because I feel the same way BUT I can tell you I have more respect for those customers that do count the money.

I like the idea about counting it then having them sign the delivery receipt...it does look more professional.



I usually count along with the bank teller, if I'm in the bank. If I'm in the drive-thru, I count before I leave. icon_smile.gif Maybe people count along with you too?

To the OP, you do what you feel is right here, but overall, I think you've gotten some great advice on how to prevent potential situations like this from happening in the future. Good luck!




I even count money I take out of an ATM before I leave the machine. I've never had a mistake, but I do know it can happen and I want it on tape with me counting, just in case..... If I miscount, I count again until I know for sure I have the correct amount.

MalibuBakinBarbie Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 8:59pm
post #30 of 37

I'm just jumping in to add that when I pay someone (for example, a landscaper who works on the yard, or the dump truck driver who delivers a load of stone), I state the amount I owe them and count the money out to them. This way the terms are stated verbally, and often accompanied by an invoice, and any miscommuncation can be discussed right then and there.

To lissyUK, I'm sorry this happened to you and I hope that you may be able to rectify it. If the person you made the cake for is someone you know well and the agreed upon price was £105, she'll probably trust that she did short you and want to make it right. Good luck!!! (And very cute cake, too!!!)

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