Supporting A Tall Wedding Cake

Baking By kwaples001 Updated 1 week ago by kakeladi

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kwaples001 Posted 28 Jun 2020 , 7:15pm
post #1 of 13

I’ve been baking for about 16 years now but I’ve always shied away from wedding cakes, so I haven’t had much need to use multiple cake boards and supports  if I’m using 4 layers each of 6”, 9” & 12” layers  how many cake boards should I use and do I used supports between each board?  I was thinking perhaps every 2 layers  is that enough?

12 replies
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kakeladi Posted 29 Jun 2020 , 1:02am
post #2 of 13

The rule of thumb is to board & dowel support every 4”.  Since the fad w/6” tall cakes I think most people are just using a center dowel.  That reqHires the cake be on at least a dbl board or a drum so that dowel has something to bite to .   

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SandraSmiley Posted 29 Jun 2020 , 1:22am
post #3 of 13

I only use an additional cake board inside a tier with it is 8" tall, which is just what you said, kakeladi.  I do use dowels in the bottom 4" before adding the second half of the tier.  There is enough difference in the size of your tiers that, if the tiers are nice and level and you use plenty of dowels, a central dowel should not be necessary.  Be sure the cake is chilled well before transporting.

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kakeladi Posted 29 Jun 2020 , 3:14am
post #4 of 13

“Dividing the four 2” layers by boarding each 4” also makes it easier to serve:)   Maybe I didn’t say it right ... put 2 layers, each 2” together with filling between and place dowels in it which will support the next section of 4” tall cakes.  This makes the bottom “tier” — your 12”x8” .   Next you put dowels in the 12”er to support the 9” tier that’s put together following the same process for all 4 layers you did w/your 12” tier. —2 layers, filled, dowel, repeat w/the next 2 layers on a board & dowel the top layer to support the top tier which is assembled the same.     Are you going to be delivering this assembled?  Or can you put it together at venue? 

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SandraSmiley Posted 29 Jun 2020 , 11:22pm
post #5 of 13

bump

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kwaples001 Posted 1 week ago
post #6 of 13

Thank you for all the advice. I really appreciate it. Unfortunately, I'm going to be delivering it about 45 minutes away over windy country roads and I want to assemble it at home since I'm so unsure of what I'm doing in case I have a catastrophe. I understand the 2 layers with filling between then a board on top and repeat the process. I'm not sure I understand how you're describing to use the center dowel rod. Do I use just one really long one or do I dowel the 9" to the 12" in the center part way then the 6" to the 9"? I'm also curious about something else. When you serve the cake doesn't all the frosting stick to the board above? How do you prevent that from happening so that doesn't look like naked cake or all messy looking?


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kakeladi Posted 1 week ago
post #7 of 13

A center dowel is one long one that is pushed down through all the cake layers to the base board.  Using a cake drum is best so it is thick enough for the dowel will bite into holding the cake in place.  

I know driving on such roads as I lived in the mountains:)  I seldom used a center dowel—it was not widely mentioned back in the yrs I did my decorating:)   It is possible to still have a safe delivery w/o using one w/carefull driving.  It also can give false security—thinking it will be ok to just drive w/o care because it’s doweled

 You have a nice spread of sizes , a base cake 12” which should go on a 14 or better yet 16” drum to help w/ stability.   Be sure the cake is on a level surface in the vehicle — what will you be driving?  Are you driving or someone else?  

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kakeladi Posted 1 week ago
post #8 of 13

A center dowel is one long one that is pushed down through all the cake layers to the base board.  Using a cake drum is best so it is thick enough for the dowel will bite into holding the cake in place.  

I know driving on such roads as I lived in the mountains:)  I seldom used a center dowel—it was not widely mentioned back in the yrs I did my decorating:)   It is possible to still have a safe delivery w/o using one w/carefull driving.  It also can give false security—thinking it will be ok to just drive w/o care because it’s doweled

 You have a nice spread of sizes , a base cake 12” which should go on a 14 or better yet 16” drum to help w/ stability.   Be sure the cake is on a level surface in the vehicle — what will you be driving?  Are you driving or someone else?  

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kwaples001 Posted 1 week ago
post #9 of 13

Driving a Prius..LOL May ask my daughter to come get me in her minivan then I'll have another person. Thank you again, so very much


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SandraSmiley Posted 1 week ago
post #10 of 13

I live way out in the sticks in Middle Tennessee, curvy, country roads with continuous hills.  All of my deliveries are over an hour, the longest being three.  I only use a central dowel if my cake is really tall and skinny.  With the difference in the size of your tiers, you have a great foundation.  With the correct doweling (and you seem to understand doweling very well) and nice flat tiers, I doubt you will have any trouble at all.  I would definitely recommend you have your daughter go with you in the mini van.  A flat surface is critical.  I make liberal use of the skid proof pads, under the box, inside the box, etc.  My best tip for transporting a stacked cake is to keep it as cold as possible.  For the last several years, I have been using Sedar Yener's portable cooler and it works a charm.  The only thing I do differently is to load the cake from one end instead of the top, which makes it much easier to slide in and out.  Create a box that exactly fits your cake drum so it cannot slide around inside the box.

As to protecting the frosting when stacking the tiers, I always put a piece of wax paper between the frosting and the cake board.  When you remove the top tiers and the wax paper, it does disrupt the icing a bit, but not nearly as much as the cake board without it would.




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kwaples001 Posted 1 week ago
post #11 of 13

OMG thank you so much for the link to the travel fridge!!! That’s so easy and smart! I agree with making the lid on the side so you can slide the cake  I don’t know what my deal is but it seems almost like my cakes aren’t finished unless I hit it with a hand or something else the screw it up as I box them so that I have to repair it at the lady minute  I’m cursed! The wax paper makes tons of sense too  thank you so much for your time and advice! Have a great holiday!! 

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SandraSmiley Posted 1 week ago
post #12 of 13

A great holiday back to you, kwaples001!  I just got through making blueberry and strawberry sauces to adorn the cheesecake for the picnic lunch today.

One other thing......DRIVE LIKE A GRANNY!  Easy around curves and gradual stops (I'm sure you already know this).  I am not sure it is necessary, but we always strap my box in place with a net, in the back of the SUV.  I also have it setting on a skid proof pad.

Best of luck!  You got this! 

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kakeladi Posted 1 week ago
post #13 of 13

You have gotten sooo much great information I’m sure your delivery is going to be “hitchless”

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