Furry Texture

Decorating By louglou Updated 9 Jan 2020 , 5:10pm by SandraSmiley

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louglou Posted 8 Jan 2020 , 12:40pm
post #1 of 15

How would you achieve a furry texture on fondant? Or should I use buttercream and a grass tip? It’s for a cake of a little penguin toy similar to this one.

Also it only needs to be 15 servings. Would a 6” tall with a 4” or 5” diameter base be enough?

Furry Texture

14 replies
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kakeladi Posted 8 Jan 2020 , 2:37pm
post #2 of 15

Using the grass tip will give a completely different look   You need to cover fondant with something like ground rice cereal—something that will not make it stand out & away from the skin   Maybe use a wadded up ball of foil to texture it? Or a sponge?   Never tried it,don’t know just thinking of some of the things I’ve seen on the tv shows:)   You want more of a “plush” fur look not a fury one 

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kakeladi Posted 8 Jan 2020 , 2:46pm
post #3 of 15

As for the size I d say taper it — a couple 6”s then a couple 5 or 4”  or sculpt the shape from all 6” ers   The body 3 layers then the head a ball/bowl cake   If the head is RCT I would not consider it in the # of servings then you would need to make the body 4 or 5 layers tall  

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SandraSmiley Posted 8 Jan 2020 , 5:29pm
post #4 of 15

He is so cute!  The first thing that comes to mind is the chocolate "velvet" technique, which is achieved by spraying fondant with chocolate.  I've looked at the stuff and it is EXPENSIVE, so haven't tried it.  It doesn't really look that fury, but the best I was able to accomplish was using small scissors and snipping millions of little tuffs, as seen on Elmo.Furry Texture

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theresaf Posted 8 Jan 2020 , 7:42pm
post #5 of 15

Oh that penguin is so cute and Sandra - great Elmo !!

Could you use a crusting buttercream and then use the point of a knife or pointed palette knife and pull up a million or so tiny peaks?  Maybe you can try it on a practice cupcake first and eat the evidence if it doesn't work out - that's generally my go-to strategy!


Theresa

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SandraSmiley Posted 8 Jan 2020 , 7:57pm
post #6 of 15

Thanks, Theresa!  Your idea with the buttercream sounds brilliant.  I bet it would work.

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jchuck Posted 9 Jan 2020 , 1:13am
post #7 of 15

Hey louglou 

This technique I’m posting isn’t really “plush” fur, but more a velvet type texture. I did a small cake using this technique. You could play with it to make a velvety fur look.


https://www.cakecentral.com/gallery/i/3408698/tiny-cake


http://www.cakewithpamelajane.com/2017/10/29/edible-faux-velvet-texture/



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SandraSmiley Posted 9 Jan 2020 , 1:22am
post #8 of 15

Thank you for sharing this June.  It looks glamorous!  Could you taste the wafer paper when eating the cake?

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jchuck Posted 9 Jan 2020 , 2:34am
post #9 of 15

No Sandra

You couldn’t taste the wafer paper. It’s basically edible dried rice. I guess because the wafer paper was so finely crushed into minute pieces. Trying to remember if I covered my cake in buttercream first or fondant?? Can’t remember without reading the description of the cake!!! I think it was fondant. So the wafer paper would sort of blend in with the fondant as you ate a slice of cake.

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SandraSmiley Posted 9 Jan 2020 , 3:02am
post #10 of 15

I thought wafer paper was made from potato starch?  Whatever, I know some people like it, probably the same ones who ate paste in the first grade, but I think it is gross.  Good to know it can be used like this and not be noticed because it is a beautiful effect.

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louglou Posted 9 Jan 2020 , 5:39am
post #11 of 15

Thanks for all the amazing advice. The real life toy penguin is quite old and tatty and has far more distinct fur than the one in the picture I posted. I’m going to try out a couple of techniques. I’ll post a picture of the finished cake. It’s not due till end of Feb so I have lots of time to practise. 

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jchuck Posted 9 Jan 2020 , 12:56pm
post #12 of 15

Sandra Yes, wafer paper is made from potato flour, and also rice flour. I do believe when wafer paper first came out it was exclusively made from rice flour/starch. But I read somewhere there was cast offs from potatoes from food production, so that was one of the ways to use the cast offs, making wafer paper. I’ve broken off pieces of wafer paper, virtually  no taste at all.

louglou Glad we could help. Looking forward to your creation.

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kakeladi Posted 9 Jan 2020 , 2:19pm
post #13 of 15

Wafer paper was originally called rice paper for many years   I’ve eaten it & there is no taste   I used it often on cakes back in the late ‘80s $ ‘90s  

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kakeladi Posted 9 Jan 2020 , 2:38pm
post #14 of 15

Sandra you might be interested to know there was a book written by a gal on creating 3D animals & things   If I remember right it was written by Donna Horn   She developied carpel tunnel in both hands she could no longer decorate but was able to create great things with wafer paper.....I remember a gariff about 8” tall   I think it was self published paper back   

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SandraSmiley Posted 9 Jan 2020 , 5:10pm
post #15 of 15

So far, I've had little luck using wafer paper.  I did try making flower petals using veiners, which worked quite well, but I didn't have the patience to wait for them to dry.  I am pretty much a klutz with the stuff.

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