Glow In The Dark Chocolate

Decorating By pattycakes1 Updated 18 Nov 2019 , 2:55am by bubs1stbirthday

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pattycakes1 Posted 17 Nov 2019 , 3:33am
post #1 of 8

How do make chocolate glow in the dark?  I have a cake order and they want chocolate drips down the side of a fondant iced cake to glow in the dark.  There are 5 different colors of drips and they want them to all glow in the dark.  They have access to a black light.  I can make the colored chocolate drips but is there glow food colors that I can paint over the drips?  Please help!  I have the cake order going out on November 22, 2019

7 replies
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kakeladi Posted 17 Nov 2019 , 4:12am
post #2 of 8

If you google glow in the dark fog colors there are a number of choices   Maybe knowing what is available you can find some locally

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pattycakes1 Posted 17 Nov 2019 , 5:34pm
post #3 of 8

Thank you for replying.  I checked it out on google but it doesn't  seem like its edible or food grade.   People will be eating this.

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PattyT Posted 17 Nov 2019 , 9:58pm
post #4 of 8

Tonic water glows in the dark.  BUT:

That could be difficult if it could make the chocolate "seize".  However, there are some videos out there showing -how to use water with chocolate to make "drips".  Google -> water ganache.  sugar geek show comes up with a recipe and video, plus a few others.

Another idea could be to make the drips out of royal icing.  Make up the royal icing using tonic water then add the different colors you need with food coloring.   I've never done it, but royal drips might not hold up on buttercream.

Also, stark white glows under black light all on its own.

Black light bulbs aren't horribly expensive at the home improvement or hardware stores.  You can put it in a regular table lamp and check before you go too far.  Might want to make small batches of either the water ganache or tonic royal icing to test.

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PattyT Posted 17 Nov 2019 , 9:59pm
post #5 of 8

Oh!  I just re-read your original post and you're using fondant, not buttercream.  So maybe royal icing would be an option??

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MBalaska Posted 17 Nov 2019 , 10:41pm
post #6 of 8

I've made 'water ganache' several times. It works so well that I rarely make cream ganache any longer. 

You could easily make a small bowl of glowing seltzer water with chocolate & see if it works.  That's a fool proof way to find out.

below are brownies frosted with easy peasy water ganache.

Glow In The Dark Chocolate

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pattycakes1 Posted 18 Nov 2019 , 1:06am
post #7 of 8

Thank you everyone for your help.  Sometimes you can't see the forest through the trees.  I didn't think about royal icing or Chocolate Ganache.  The original cake design sure looked like chocolate drips but the picture wasn't watermarked so I couldn't contact the cake decorator.  I don't think the customer cares if it's chocolate drips or royal icing, they just would like the drips to glow in the dark.

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bubs1stbirthday Posted 18 Nov 2019 , 2:55am
post #8 of 8

Another option may be to use thick fondant strips, sparingly attach them to the cake (to make removal easy later on) and paint those strips with non toxic glow in the dark paint.

If the cake receivers were happy to peel the fondant off I think this would be the most fool proof way to get the job done.

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