Bubbles Under My Buttercream

Baking By Piece_acake Updated 3 days ago by jchuck

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Piece_acake Posted 6 Jul 2019 , 3:21pm
post #1 of 11

Hi all! 

I am hoping to pick your brains about a problem I’ve been having with my wedding cakes. 

Ive recently started a contract with a banquet hall in my city and I’m having a slight issue with bubbling under my buttercream. My recipe is half butter half crisco. I don’t normally have issues with this but the heat and humidity right now are terrible. Is there something I can use to further stabilize the butter cream? i notice that a lot of wedding cakes I’ve eaten as a guest have a very thick icing that stays very hard throughout the night. What recipe is that?! I can’t get my buttercream to that consistency.  

Any tips or ideas would be much appreciated!! 


10 replies
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kakeladi Posted 6 Jul 2019 , 4:01pm
post #2 of 11

Once you have frosted your cake use a toothpick to poke holes around the bottom & top  to allow excess air to escape   They will be covered by a border   Another thing is to be sure you are pressing the icing against the cake as you frost to  prevent air pockets a place to form   Look up the recipe “2 of everything “ in the recipe section of this site for a great all purpose icing   

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kakeladi Posted 6 Jul 2019 , 4:05pm
post #3 of 11

 Link to recipe:                        2 of everything icing     

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-K8memphis Posted 6 Jul 2019 , 4:42pm
post #4 of 11

yes like lynne said -- also you might want to shave off the outer edge of your cakes to remove the oil from when you greased the pan if indeed you do grease the sides of the pan -- I leave one hole open per layer in an inconspicuous spot because sometimes when you close the hole the cake farts again -- I call them cake farts obviously --

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-K8memphis Posted 6 Jul 2019 , 4:43pm
post #5 of 11

they are very annoying and some people think it is caused or exacerbated by freezing or fridging your cake but in my experience no matter the conditions all cakes and all icings do this -- grr

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Piece_acake Posted 4 days ago
post #6 of 11

Thank you for the replies. I changed my buttercream recipe and poked holes throughout and STILL had an issue with a bubble under the buttercream. I am starting to panic as I can’t  afford to have these issues every week :( 

I let my cake sit out for 4 hours before delivery and had one air bubble come out so I corrected it and still had an issue later in the evening at the event. 

Is it the softness of the buttercream?! Can I add cornstarch to thicken it up? 

Someone please help! 


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kakeladi Posted 4 days ago
post #7 of 11

Sorry can't think of anything else to help.  As I remember The few times I had problems it involved elevation changes like from 3,000 ft (or higher - I've baked/decorated at elevations as high as 8,500 ft) down to 1,000 ft or lower.  Could that be part or all of your problem? 

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-K8memphis Posted 3 days ago
post #8 of 11

did you shave the sides of your cakes and make sure you have a hole* in each layer that stays open? also be sure you are smushing the icing firmly against the cake as you ice it —

*make it a more substantial hole about the size of a regular wooden dowel all the way through the icing into the cake for each layer— not one for each tier but one for each layer so the trapped air has a way to escape — put them in the back of the cake and leave them open —

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-K8memphis Posted 3 days ago
post #9 of 11

leah s, a great cake friend on here, if I got this straight — would place a weight on top of her crumb coated cakes overnight to help all this air to escape — she and lots of others swear by this method — needs to stay at room temp to do this —

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SandraSmiley Posted 3 days ago
post #10 of 11

I notice you didn't mention shaving the sides of the layers, as -K8memphis suggested.  I was having this problem, a few years ago, and it turned out to be the oil in my homemade cake release.  It was preventing the frosting from properly adhering to the cake.  I no longer grease the sides of my pans, but use parchment rings.  No more issues.

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jchuck Posted 3 days ago
post #11 of 11

I use to love the cake release, but agree Sandra, the oil created havoc on the cakes. Leaving a a greasy film. I now just grease with very scant amount of shortening and dust with a smidge of flour. Just enough for my parchment paper to stick to the bottom and sides of the pan. 

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