Tips On Removing Lily Nail Flowers From Foil W/o Breaking??

Decorating By springlakecake Updated 27 Jul 2006 , 2:19pm by springlakecake

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springlakecake Posted 26 Jul 2006 , 11:37am
post #1 of 15

I was just wondering if there was a special way to remove lily nail flowers from the aluminum foil without breaking them?

14 replies
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SharonZ Posted 26 Jul 2006 , 11:42am
post #2 of 15

Merissa,
After I put the foil in the lilly nail, I lightly coated the inside and rim with crisco. My flowers dried for three weeks and the foil peeled right off.
Sharon

Quote:
Originally Posted by merissa

I was just wondering if there was a special way to remove lily nail flowers from the aluminum foil without breaking them?


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tbittner Posted 26 Jul 2006 , 11:50am
post #3 of 15

I used the thinnest, cheapest foil I could and used the dull side up. I did not break any and I made sure they were completely dry. My Wilton teacher said this was the time for the cheapest you could find!
Good luck!

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springlakecake Posted 26 Jul 2006 , 12:17pm
post #4 of 15

What about that reynolds non stick foil-it certainly isnt the cheapest though! So thin is best? How long do they need to dry? Putting crisco in there doesnt break down the royal icing then? Thanks!

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zoraya Posted 26 Jul 2006 , 12:24pm
post #5 of 15

I used both regular foil and the reynolds release. RR is great, popped right out without breakage. Regular foil kept tearing and couldn't get some pieces off the flowers. HTH
Zoraya

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Doug Posted 26 Jul 2006 , 12:28pm
post #6 of 15

when I make my royal icing ones this way...

cheap foil (dollar store)
no coating...after all grease kills royal

pipe the petals only, then into the oven at "warm" about 150 for about an hour or two --- the spacing on the wires of my oven rack is just perfect for them to slip into, can get almost 30 at time on one rack so about 60 at a shot.

pull out racks part way, but not all the way. pipe in the little green (or whatever color is required) stamen holder and stick in stamens (UGH--i hate doing that -- fat fingers!) then back into oven for about 20 minutes.

turn off oven, open door and allow to cool (takes not all that long)

the peel very gently like a banana....i always have extra foil sticking up so can easily get a grip and peel from top to base in multiple sections..so far none have broken.

I think the drying in the oven helps them shrink just a bit and also makes them less "sticky" if you will. only problem I'v had is if royal gets caught in wrinkle in foil

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springlakecake Posted 26 Jul 2006 , 12:41pm
post #7 of 15

Interesting...I cant get my oven temp below 200 degrees, would that be too warm? How long would they take to dry the "natural" way?

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Doug Posted 26 Jul 2006 , 1:01pm
post #8 of 15

just put it as low as it can go... 200 is "about" 150..close enough. if worried too hot, open door a crack (advisable on in winter and this killer heat summer!!!!)...

hmmm...in summer, set outside in sun under netting to keep flys off?????

-----------

can't answer on natural way, tho' was told (but can't confirm) it could take 2 days for more depending upon temp/humidity in house.

i'm usually running late/to rushed to wait...so oven dry.

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butterflyjuju Posted 26 Jul 2006 , 8:01pm
post #9 of 15

I turned our oven on low. Then put in my royal icing flowers on a cookie sheet in for about a minute. took them out and set them on the counter. They dried quickly that way too

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Cake_Princess Posted 27 Jul 2006 , 2:05am
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug


no coating...after all grease kills royal




This is not entirely true.

I myself have piped royal icing onto wax paper lightly coated with crisco. (I'm pretty sure that Colette Peters also uses a similar technique when she does intricate work in royal.) Never had a problem with my royal icing breaking down.

Let me explain the grease breaking down royal icing and grease thing. Originally, royal icing was made with raw egg whites. This gave volume and strength to the icing. However, any traces of fat (including yolk) would prevent the egg whites from whipping up as they should. Leading to the whole royal icing will break down when in contact with grease.

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Cake_Princess Posted 27 Jul 2006 , 2:08am
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by merissa

I was just wondering if there was a special way to remove lily nail flowers from the aluminum foil without breaking them?




I buy cheap foil and pinch holes in the foil when I place it in the flower nail. This way the back of the flower will dry much faster.

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springlakecake Posted 27 Jul 2006 , 12:40pm
post #12 of 15

CakePrincess-just a little more curious about your reply. So is it just a wives tale about grease breaking down royal icing? I mean they sure make a big deal about it in the classes and books. I have never had a problem with grease breaking down royal, and i have put royal decorations on buttercream with out any problems, but now I wonder are we all being too fanatic about the whole "grease" thing. Just how much grease or under what circumstances can royal withstand grease??

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Cake_Princess Posted 27 Jul 2006 , 1:15pm
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by merissa

CakePrincess-just a little more curious about your reply. So is it just a wives tale about grease breaking down royal icing? I mean they sure make a big deal about it in the classes and books. I have never had a problem with grease breaking down royal, and i have put royal decorations on buttercream with out any problems, but now I wonder are we all being too fanatic about the whole "grease" thing. Just how much grease or under what circumstances can royal withstand grease??




The problem is that most people do not make royal using egg whites so they do not know the real reason for saying grease will break down royal icing. I guess we can chalk it up to having half of the story.

As long as your icing is made there will be no problem piping it on to a lightly greased surface. This will just help it to pop off a bit easier and minimize breakage.

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Doug Posted 27 Jul 2006 , 1:34pm
post #14 of 15

thanks cake_princess....

ya learn something new every day!! icon_smile.gif

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springlakecake Posted 27 Jul 2006 , 2:19pm
post #15 of 15

Yes, thank you for the info!

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