Fondant Questions

Decorating By greenhorn Updated 13 Jun 2007 , 2:18pm by randipanda

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greenhorn Posted 8 Jun 2007 , 12:14pm
post #1 of 20

My attempt at a fondant topsy turvy is ending sadly (cake balls in near future), which leaves me with more fondant questions. How thin must the fondant be rolled? I think mine was probably too heavy. How much buttercream should be under the fondant? I crumb coated and then iced...is this too much? Last night the fondant seemed to be sliding down the cake and icing and fondant were pooling at the bottom. Are you supposed to mist the iced cake before applying fondant? The two layers I did this to are the ones that are collapsing. And finally, I used the WASC recipe for this project...Is this a heavy enough cake to hold the structure of topsy turvy?
Thanks!

19 replies
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jguilbeau Posted 8 Jun 2007 , 12:22pm
post #2 of 20

Bump, I too would like to know how much buttercream to put under the findant.

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kello Posted 8 Jun 2007 , 12:26pm
post #3 of 20

I've always done 2 thin coats of BC. One to crumb caot and then another to smooth things out. Crumbs and imperfections will show thru the fondant.....which I normally roll to about an 1/8 inch thick...depending on the cake I'm doing. I've never misted a cake before though.
HTH

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tyty Posted 8 Jun 2007 , 1:14pm
post #4 of 20

I use a thin layer of BC on the cake. The topsy turvy cake I made, the same thing happened. But my cake was not a sturdy cake. I never made wasc before. The next time I attempt a topsy turvy. I will make sure the cake is sturdy enough to hold the fondant. Never heard of misting first.

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miriel Posted 8 Jun 2007 , 2:07pm
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I crumb coat and apply a regular coat of buttercream before applying the fondant. As for rolling out the fondant, I do mine at approximately 1/4" thick. If you use a crusting BC recipe, I would lightly mist the BC with water before adhering the fondant. If not, misting is not necessary.

It helps to firm up the BC before applying the fondant so I place the cake in the fridge for a few minutes to do this.

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Cake_Princess Posted 8 Jun 2007 , 2:37pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greenhorn

My attempt at a fondant topsy turvy is ending sadly (cake balls in near future), which leaves me with more fondant questions. How thin must the fondant be rolled? I think mine was probably too heavy.




You will get various answers for the thickness of fondant. I personally prefer to roll my fondant on the thinner side. The reason I find is most people do not like the texture of fondant (and depending on the brand they dont like the taste). So basically I roll it thin enough so I can still handle it without it tearing when placing it on the cake. So I think slightly thinner than a stick of gum. For decorations and stuff like that it maybe slightly thicker depending on what I am making.

Quote:
Quote:

How much buttercream should be under the fondant? I crumb coated and then iced...is this too much?




I put a thick coat of buttercream icing under my fondant. I find the bottom of the fondant starts to soften up and melds into the buttercream. Most of my customers tell me they find the fondant more palatable that way.


Quote:
Quote:

Last night the fondant seemed to be sliding down the cake and icing and fondant were pooling at the bottom.





Sounds like there was too much moisture in your buttercream. What recipe did you use? Was it hot out? Did you mist the buttercream?

Quote:
Quote:

Are you supposed to mist the iced cake before applying fondant? The two layers I did this to are the ones that are collapsing.




Hmmm, extra moisture. Not good.

I use piping gel to. place a bead around the base of The cake and the top egdes and that's it.

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randipanda Posted 8 Jun 2007 , 3:00pm
post #7 of 20

I tend to do it on the thicker side, it will help smooth at the pleats at the bottom. Probably between 1/8 and 1/4 inch. I've watched the Ace of Cakes show though, and he rolls his fondant THICK sometimes, it seriously looked like 1/2 inch- I think of the time he did the tennis ball. That makes sense too, because he'd have to have some give to get it covered all the way around. I guess it would depend on what you are doing, which makes sense. But generally I put a thin coat of buttercream, just enough so I can't see the layers through it, fairly smooth, because as long as I have a the thicker coat of fondant it'll cover the imperfections.

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greenhorn Posted 8 Jun 2007 , 9:10pm
post #8 of 20

Thanks to all who answered....I appreciate all the help I can get!
Cake Princess-- I used a crusting Buttercream. My cakes were crusted enough that I was able to smooth them with a paper towel...is that crusted enough? I also made sure they were in the refrigerator until I was ready to apply the fondant. I don't understand the piping gel...do you just go around the entire top and bottom of each layer? How does this help?

Can anyone tell me if WASC is a sturdy enough cake for this? I'm anxious to try this again, although this is an expensive and time consuming cake to do for practice!

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tripleE Posted 12 Jun 2007 , 5:35am
post #9 of 20

I'm joining greenhorn with the question about WASC being sturdy enough for rolled fondant. Anybody know if it can handle the weight of fondant?

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miriel Posted 12 Jun 2007 , 5:42am
post #10 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by tripleE

I'm joining greenhorn with the question about WASC being sturdy enough for rolled fondant. Anybody know if it can handle the weight of fondant?




WASC can be covered with fondant.

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jmt1714 Posted 12 Jun 2007 , 1:34pm
post #11 of 20

IMHO, the cake should be VERY cold before putting on the fondant. i would swear that th DVD I have forom N. Lodge says he puts the cake into the freezer for 45 min after he puts on the final buttercream coat to firm it up before it puts on the fondant

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pierce517 Posted 13 Jun 2007 , 1:08am
post #12 of 20

Ok - I'm new to most of what is being said here - have never done fondant and need to try this weekend for my daughters birthday. I'm not even sure what crusted buttercream is..... help! I use the recipie in the Wilton 1 class book. Mine has never crusted - certainlty not to the point that you could wipe it with a paper towel. I'm interested to know how to do this and how you smooth a cake when it has crusted.

Thanks for all of your help to this newbie. So glad I found this great site. have sat here reading things for 4 hours the past two nights. It IS addictive!

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Biya Posted 13 Jun 2007 , 2:58am
post #13 of 20

Wasc is certainly sturdy enough for a topsy turvy cake. Any dense cake will work if your planning on carving.

Pierce517: This is an excellent crusting buttercream http://www.cakecentral.com/cake_recipe-2523-45-Julies-Less-Sweet-Buttercream-Frosting.html

Crusting just means it forms a crust when you refrigerate it. This makes it easier to smooth and won't stick to your paper towel if using the viva method. These are the cc articles (includes a few methods for smoothing icing) http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-guides.html

Good Luck!

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KrisD13 Posted 13 Jun 2007 , 3:20am
post #14 of 20

pierce517, the recipe in the Wilton book is a crusting BC recipe. You don't wipe the icing, you pat it or run a knife/hand/etc over top to smooth it. In my course 1 we were taught to use wax paper, but there are so many other methods here to try.

You can find all kinds of descriptions here to help you out. Did/are you taking the course, or did you just get the book?

And, yep, I'm an addict, too! icon_razz.gificon_biggrin.gif

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sweet_as_tisse Posted 13 Jun 2007 , 8:59am
post #15 of 20

Hey guys

i just did my first topsy turvey/whimsical, i used a Madeira cake which is pretty dense and moist but will hold fondant really well.. i carved it, crumb coated it and covered it with fondant when it was still frozen, the only thing supporting it is a piece of cardboard under the top tier and a skewer down the middle...

its still in my fridge and has not sunk down or fallen apart.. it was just a practice one thats why i still have it..

Madeira cake will last 10 days or more covered with fondant, so its a good cake to use as these cakes can take a few days to decorate...

HTH

cheers

kylie
LL

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asul Posted 13 Jun 2007 , 9:09am
post #16 of 20

what is the recipe for Mandeira cake? icon_confused.gif

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sweet_as_tisse Posted 13 Jun 2007 , 9:22am
post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by asul

what is the recipe for Mandeira cake? icon_confused.gif




I just went back and edited my post as i misspelt Madeira, there is no N in the spelling.. sorry!!

basically its just flour butter castor sugar (superfine sugar) and eggs, if you google search madeira cake lots of recipes and variations on the recipes will come up.

i used a recipe out of Lindy Smiths book, its hard to give you that recipe as she list each size pan to use and the recipe according to that so the amounts change depending on the size you need...

cheers

kylie

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pierce517 Posted 13 Jun 2007 , 12:49pm
post #18 of 20

Hi ladies - thanks so much for your help. I did actually take the class, but had a really lousy instructor. She seemed to have skipped over a lot of the basics icon_sad.gif I will try to find more info on smoothing the icing. I've done the hot knife method, but things dont get as smooths as I would like. So is the idea to put the cake in the fridge, let it crust, then do the hot knife? Also, I saw somewhere in here that someone used a dense rubber roller? I cant seem to find more details on that. Can anyone help me out? Thanks again! Laurel

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RICKASH Posted 13 Jun 2007 , 1:45pm
post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by pierce517

Hi ladies - thanks so much for your help. I will try to find more info on smoothing the icing. I've done the hot knife method, but things dont get as smooths as I would like. Also, I saw somewhere in here that someone used a dense rubber roller? I cant seem to find more details on that. Can anyone help me out? Thanks again! Laurel




Hi Laurel

Here's a link that might help you with the smoothing method.
I havent dont this myself, but good luck.
http://www.cakecentral.com/article10-How-To-Create-Faux-Fondant-The-Paper-Towel-Method----Viva.html

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randipanda Posted 13 Jun 2007 , 2:18pm
post #20 of 20

The hot knife method is used for non-crusting buttercreams, or on crusting buttercreams before they crust. If you try to use it on a crusted buttercream it will just melt the crust and ruin it. With a crusted butter cream you gently rub or roll the surface so smooth out the cracks and rough edges, usually when you do that you do it with something in between to protect the finish-waxed paper, or parchment paper or paper towels.

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