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DIY color mist/food color spray? - Page 2

post #16 of 25
I know it's a few days after the original post , but I have a suggestion! In his sculpted car cake class on Craftsy, mike McCarey mixed a bit of vodka with powdered color (luster dust, ect) in a little jar that was attached to something called a PREVAL PAINT SPRAYER, and used it to spray color onto a piece of modeling chocolate. Home Depot sells it for like $10 I think. It works like a spray paint can but you can fill it with your liquid of choice. Now this is just my suggestion, as I have learned on this site that it's important to tread very lightly.. .icon_biggrin.gif
post #17 of 25

i've used those for dummies and non-edible creations--but i've never used it on food to eat--

 

(tread lightly--i hear yah)

one baker's 'never ever do' is the next baker's 'i swear by this'
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one baker's 'never ever do' is the next baker's 'i swear by this'
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post #18 of 25

I thought the propellant in those Preval Sprayer thingies wasn't food safe.

Answers to the most often asked questions re: SPS. SPS instructions are on Page 15 of the Sticky at the top of the Cake Decorating Forum. Supplies can be ordered from Oasis Supply, Global or BakeryCrafts.
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Answers to the most often asked questions re: SPS. SPS instructions are on Page 15 of the Sticky at the top of the Cake Decorating Forum. Supplies can be ordered from Oasis Supply, Global or BakeryCrafts.
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post #19 of 25
Just looked it up. The manufacturers guide says to not use it with food items so womp for me I guess :/ now on to write a letter to Mr. Mccarey
post #20 of 25

no no no not at all--no womping---you  presented that very carefully and mike is not the only one to use it--the guy at christopher garrens used it on tv on a real cake--so i mean it's kinda easy to tell that it's not food safe because they sell them in the paint department--it would sure be cool if they were though--

one baker's 'never ever do' is the next baker's 'i swear by this'
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one baker's 'never ever do' is the next baker's 'i swear by this'
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post #21 of 25

Agreed - not whopping!

 

Look at the heated discussions regarding the use of blue painter's tape, pencils, disco dust and the myriad of Non-Toxic stuff people use on food to be eaten. 

 

This shows us that it is VERY EASY to migrate from Only Use to Adaptive Use to "It should be OK" Use to "Everybody does it".

 

It can be incredibly difficult to get accurate information - because the lines DO blur and there ARE opposing opinions as to what's ok.

 

That's why I err to the safe side and use Food Grade whenever reasonable and practical. At the same time, I learn the *rules* so that I can metaphorically break them. I know when I'm using a Decoration Only super luster gold vs a Food Grade color....

 

A little common sense goes a long way. I remember demonstrating airbrushing through lace fabric at my first ICES some 6-7 years ago.... Very serious lady asked me if the lace fabric was food grade. I just blinked at her at first. Then said the lace was as food grade as an apron, washcloth or kitchen towel.

 

And, in my less-informed days, I cut my alcohol-based airbrush body paint with isopropyl because I didn't do my research first. Talk about the mother of all migraines...


Edited by LisaBerczel - 1/6/14 at 2:45pm

Craftsy Instructor: Master Series: The Art of Airbrushing. 

http://www.craftsy.com/class/the-art-of-airbrushing/418

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Craftsy Instructor: Master Series: The Art of Airbrushing. 

http://www.craftsy.com/class/the-art-of-airbrushing/418

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post #22 of 25
Thread Starter 

Thank you for all your suggestions and opinions! That was quite a number, thank you really--I almost thought nobody was going to respond (insecure newbie syndrome and definitely self-diagnosed). I may go ahead and try extract instead of water. :) Also, I actually don't live in the U.S.--or any country in the western hemisphere for that matter--but I appreciated the references to places and prices and all. So thanks.:)

post #23 of 25

first of all--many thanks to culpitt's -- so nice of them to be so kind and go the extra mile to provide documentation and to write me back--

 

so to clarify the isopropyl issue across the countries of united states and england  (maybe more) --i wrote this email

 

Quote:
 

Hi--i am writing from America to ask about how to use one of your products--how to use it in the UK--it is dipping Solution # 54480--as a dipping solution i believe that you can dunk sugar paste flowers in there to color them all at once? flowers that will not necessarily be eaten--am i correct?

Would this also be the product you would recommend to use for painting on cookies that are going to be eaten--we do not have food grade isoproplyl alcohol available here in this form so we are not sure how to proceed--thank you so much!

 

 

culpitt's wrote back:

 

Quote:
 

Thank you for your enquiry about our dipping solution, please find attached a technical specification for this product.  I can confirm that this product can be used on items that will be eaten as long as it is mixed with another food grade product when being used.  The Iso-Propyl Alcohol that is in this product will evaporate when used and therefore is safe for use on edible items.

 

You are correct in thinking that this product can be used to dip sugar paste flowers to colour them all at once or for painting designs/decorations on sugar paste coverings.

 

I hope this information helps you.

 

 

so the technical specs have no further information other than it's all been signed off on very official and securely--trust me on that--no need to post that really--

 

so due to the different grades of alcohol available in different countries, isoproply alcohol in the correct grade available outside the u.s. is  perfectly safe to use on edibles like cookies etc when mixed with another food grade product--

 

just to provide proof to absolutely put everyone's mind at ease--

one baker's 'never ever do' is the next baker's 'i swear by this'
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one baker's 'never ever do' is the next baker's 'i swear by this'
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post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by vanillarella View Post

I have been meaning to make plaid sugar cookies this way and in the process I need some sort of food color spray. I'm not so sure if Wilton color mists are readily available where I live but if they ever even are, I still want to DIY my own to cut on costs and all. Any ideas on how to recreate those color mists? Can food color gel and some water work on dried royal icing?
I got super cheap spritzer bottles from eBay, filled them with a mixture of vodka and gel food coloring, and sprayed them on royal-iced cookies. It works.
I made these cookies using that method
http://cakecentral.com/g/i/3033429/a/3364418/what-a-mess-but-next-batch-will-be-better-first-time-trying-stencil-bamboo-stencil-with-wilton-color-mist/
Not my best work, but I was just experimenting.
The bamboo stencil was the most expensive thing! But since you're making the one in the tutorial, that should be cheap too. I think the spritz bottles were less than $2 with free shipping (from china).


ETA: oops. In the photo caption, I wrote wilton color mist. But I did use the method above too. Just no photos. Sorry!
Edited by Sassyzan - 1/19/14 at 6:40am
post #25 of 25
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Originally Posted by kalushi View Post
 

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