Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Cake Decorating › Cake servings help needed
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Cake servings help needed - Page 2

post #16 of 33

Check this out by icedjems.com! I thought it was so awesome I printed it out for my book and refer to it often!

post #17 of 33

Here the Cake Calculator I use all the time. It is based off Wilton servings - shinymetalobjects.net/cake/calculator/cakulator.cgi?pan=Round%2C+12"&option=2&option=Select+Cakulator&chart=wiltonWedding2Inch&chart=Select+Chart&calculate=Calculate%21&.cgifields=pan

post #18 of 33

I love the cake calculator!    I am told Wilton is the "standard" and probably because it was the first to create a serving chart--back in the day.    It is what I use but I know a lot of people that use Earlene's. 

Debbie - US Army (Retired) --aka "The Cake Sarge"

Good Cake Ain't Cheap! Cheap Cake Ain't Good!
Reply
Debbie - US Army (Retired) --aka "The Cake Sarge"

Good Cake Ain't Cheap! Cheap Cake Ain't Good!
Reply
post #19 of 33
Mine basically splits the difference between the two, erring a bit more towards Wilton.
*Top 100 Designers in The USA, Brides Magazine, 2013*<---little ole' me!
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Reply
*Top 100 Designers in The USA, Brides Magazine, 2013*<---little ole' me!
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Reply
post #20 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kerry_Kake View Post
 

Check this out by icedjems.com! I thought it was so awesome I printed it out for my book and refer to it often!

No!!! This is the silliest chart out there. I'm being so emphatic because I can't believe it's still circulating. It is not possible in the physical world  that we live in to get the serving sizes claimed on the left hand side on the round cakes. It's simple math..  On the 8 in cake and the 10 in , the numbers are a laugh. I didn't bother checking on the bigger sizes.

 

If you don't believe me and were absent all the days this was covered in school:

for the 8 in cake

 

A = π × r2

area= 3.14 x 4 squared

area=50

 

But the the slices are not 1x1, but 1x2, which is twice as big, so you divide 50 by 2 and get 25. Allow for some crumbs and 24 is the most you're going to get, not 28.


Edited by howsweet - 9/27/13 at 8:53am
post #21 of 33
But it's so preeeeeetty!
*Top 100 Designers in The USA, Brides Magazine, 2013*<---little ole' me!
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Reply
*Top 100 Designers in The USA, Brides Magazine, 2013*<---little ole' me!
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Reply
post #22 of 33
That one was floating around my Facebook feed this morning.
elsewhere.
Reply
elsewhere.
Reply
post #23 of 33

Is this any better? Numbers are based on the cakulator! I just really liked the chart and now the numbers are more correct...or I hope!

post #24 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kerry_Kake View Post
 

Is this any better? Numbers are based on the cakulator! I just really liked the chart and now the numbers are more correct...or I hope!

 

 

The numbers on the left are the same as the Wilton chart (and generally slightly under what is theoretically possible) so that side is fine.

 

But on the other side -- A 2x2 slice of cake is twice the size of a 1x2 slice, right? So the amounts on the right hand side are generally going to be about half of the ones on the left. While they aren't going to be exactly half because of the logistics of cutting cake, it doesn't make sense that if there are 12, 1x2 servings that there would also be 12, 2x2 servings, does it?

 

To figure out what is theoretically possible, it's the same formula as above, but instead of dividing by 2 you divide by 4 (the formula finds the number of square inches so the 1x2 serving size is double one square inch, and twice double is quadruple...hence dividing by 2 on the the left side and by 4 on the right side).

 

So the radius squared times pi is 3x3x3.14= 28 and 28/4 is 7.  But cutting 6 equal servings might be a more plausible recommendation. If I were making the chart, I would call it 6.

 

 

The others are impossible also (on the right)

8 in can't be more than 12

10 in cant' be more than 19

12 in -- 28

14 in --- 38

16 in--- 50

 

 

post #25 of 33

That's assuming my arithmetic is right and I didn't check it

post #26 of 33

I probably should have erased the 2x2 servings, not sure exactly what it is that Wilton does, but it's not 2x2, sorry about that! I used the cakulator for both sides for a 3" pan size. I have no idea why the 6" cake has the same amounts on both sides.

post #27 of 33
Thread Starter 

Thank you guys for your help.And I have also seen that pretty serving chart but thought it wasn't accurate.

post #28 of 33

I just received an order for a cake that is to be two tier and serve eighty people.  I am thinking of telling her she needs a 6" on top and I can maybe go 10" and 12" for the rest.  I never made a cake for this many people before and I don't want them to run out.  Are these good sizes for 80 servings? Thanks!

post #29 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ekaba View Post
 

I just received an order for a cake that is to be two tier and serve eighty people.  I am thinking of telling her she needs a 6" on top and I can maybe go 10" and 12" for the rest.  I never made a cake for this many people before and I don't want them to run out.  Are these good sizes for 80 servings? Thanks!


I'd suggest a 6" x 9" x 12" for 100 servings.

post #30 of 33

Then she'd be getting extra 20 servings. Is there maybe a 6" 8" 10" that'll work? I think that 12' will be too much cake. If it was five or so slices over, okay. But 20 is pushing it. Sorry, but this is my first big order and I don't want to give cake away, but I'd like to provide them with a chart for cutting and get eighty or so out of it.(going by way of three tier) Thanks again!

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cake Decorating
Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Cake Decorating › Cake servings help needed