Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Cake Decorating › For Those Who Feed Others Disco Dust
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

For Those Who Feed Others Disco Dust - Page 4  

post #46 of 164

My mom has issues with her GI, something about pockets that get irritated? I know I could find it if I googled it. I can totally see disco dust being a problem for her if she ate a slice of cake slathered in it. :(

*Top 100 Designers in The USA, Brides Magazine, 2013*<---little ole' me!
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
*Top 100 Designers in The USA, Brides Magazine, 2013*<---little ole' me!
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
post #47 of 164

Diverticulosis. Yep, that's it. :(

*Top 100 Designers in The USA, Brides Magazine, 2013*<---little ole' me!
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
*Top 100 Designers in The USA, Brides Magazine, 2013*<---little ole' me!
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
post #48 of 164

Uh, yes. I'm not a doctor, and neither do I play one on television, but I can definitely see the equation:

 

Diverticulosis + Disco Dust = diverticulitis.

 

Diverticulosis is a relatively benign condition, involving tiny pockets in the intestinal wall, that many people have, without symptoms, and never even know it until such time as it's discovered in a colonoscopy.

 

Diverticulitis, on the other hand, is a life-threatening condition involving inflammation (and usually infection) of the aforementioned tiny pockets.

James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

post #49 of 164

Yes, the latter is a result of infection.

*Top 100 Designers in The USA, Brides Magazine, 2013*<---little ole' me!
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
*Top 100 Designers in The USA, Brides Magazine, 2013*<---little ole' me!
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
post #50 of 164

http://www.flickr.com/photos/yuma_couture_cakes/7161854941/in/photostream

 

This is probably even worse than disco dust, but maybe not.icon_biggrin.gif However you can see that the little crystals were adhered to a piece of fondant with STRICT instructions to remove before cutting. And if the little piece of fondant didn't still say IZZI after they peeled it off, they had some hunting to do (for stray crystals). I don't have a problem with this kind of thing though. It was specifically requested by client, and they were warned and a disclaimer was clearly noted in contract. Would I suggest it myself while designing something? Probably not. I'd much rather play with isomalt and sugar, but I don't *mind* it.

*Top 100 Designers in The USA, Brides Magazine, 2013*<---little ole' me!
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
*Top 100 Designers in The USA, Brides Magazine, 2013*<---little ole' me!
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
post #51 of 164
Thread Starter 

I was accused of being "arrogant" early on in this thread.  "Less than diplomatic" would have been more accurate.  :)

 

But speaking of arrogance...isn't it a little arrogant to assume that one has the level of education necessary to declare that DD passes through the system intact with no ill effects to any human beings...effectively declaring oneself smarter than all of the professionals in the FDA, and thus deciding to disagree with the FDA and feed plastic to the public?  

 

DD is not food.  It is plastic. Professionals have a duty to not feed the public plastic.  Enough said.  :)

 

-------------

 

And in reference to the deleted comments, I would like to state that I attacked no one.  I told someone that her cake was gorgeous, but DD is not edible and should not be fed to her customers.  She replied (to paraphrase) that she has no problem with it.  I then stated that to continue to use DD is unethical and professional.  I did not state that SHE was unethical, unprofessional, or say anything about her as a person.  I advised her that the practice of feeding people plastic was unethical and unprofessional.

 

And it is.

 

It is likewise unethical and unprofessional to continue to put poisonous flowers on cakes once one has learned that the flowers are poisonous.

 

It is unethical and unprofessional to knowingly place non-food-grade or non-medical-grade wires in cakes.

 

It is unethical and unprofessional to knowingly hold cakes with perishable fillings at room temperature for greater than 4 hours.

 

It is unethical and unprofessional to place images printed with regular, toxic printer ink on cakes (one of my own students told me that she had been buying wafer paper and printing images from her regular printer for her family's cakes for years icon_eek.gif )

 

It is unethical and unprofessional for bakers to re-ice clients' cakes that their cute little pooch or kitty has licked half the icing off of (yes, I've seen people post they've done this more than once here).

 

It is unethical and unprofessional to work on cakes while you are sick with an infectious disease or illness (people post on here how sick they are with the flu but they're slogging through all their cake orders anyway).

 

If you have a business and you feed the public and you engage in any of these practices KNOWINGLY then I will tell you that your practices are unethical and unprofessional.

 

If you have a business, you should heed the admonitions of your colleagues before your health inspector shows up and enters those violations onto a permanent record for your business or God forbid, you actually harm someone!

 

I remember when I learned that DD was plastic.  My immediate reaction was, "Oh $#!%!  Who did I feed that to??"  It just shocks me when people who learn about food safety issues react with, "Oh pish-posh, I haven't killed anyone yet, I've seen so-and-so do it on TV, so I'll just keep on doing it."  These are the justifications people have used for years here and in other forums. I don't have a lot of tolerance for people who so arrogantly decide they know better than medical professionals and public health authorities.

 

Enough rambling.  I've gotta get rolling on these cakes or I will be up all night!  :)

~ Sherri
~ Sherri
post #52 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZCouture View Post

http://www.flickr.com/photos/yuma_couture_cakes/7161854941/in/photostream

 

This is probably even worse than disco dust, but maybe not.icon_biggrin.gif However you can see that the little crystals were adhered to a piece of fondant with STRICT instructions to remove before cutting. And if the little piece of fondant didn't still say IZZI after they peeled it off, they had some hunting to do (for stray crystals). I don't have a problem with this kind of thing though. It was specifically requested by client, and they were warned and a disclaimer was clearly noted in contract. Would I suggest it myself while designing something? Probably not. I'd much rather play with isomalt and sugar, but I don't *mind* it.

 

 

 

 

scarey though

 

we did not even like to put the plastic baby in the King cakes

 

we put it separate and the client could hide it in there

 

remember when the bride used all those dang charms on ribbons hidden in a shower cake

one baker's 'never ever do' is the next baker's 'i swear by this'
one baker's 'never ever do' is the next baker's 'i swear by this'
post #53 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by hbquikcomjamesl View Post

Uh, yes. I'm not a doctor, and neither do I play one on television, but I can definitely see the equation:

 

Diverticulosis + Disco Dust = diverticulitis.

 

Diverticulosis is a relatively benign condition, involving tiny pockets in the intestinal wall, that many people have, without symptoms, and never even know it until such time as it's discovered in a colonoscopy.

 

Diverticulitis, on the other hand, is a life-threatening condition involving inflammation (and usually infection) of the aforementioned tiny pockets.

This is correct - I have diverticulosis - have had it for several years.  Disco dust has never affected my condition.  

post #54 of 164

I am glad a wilton school instructor told me not to use DD on anything people plan on eating.  This speaks with before you think mentality is not acceptable in everyday face to face society and should not be acceptable when you are hidden in front of a computer screen or mobile device.  In my everyday life I had given people who speak without thinking first diagnoses as having diarrhea of the mouth. Unfortunately, from time to time  to I suffer from these symptoms. Next time you disagree someone’s thoughts or behavior and it upsets you, think will others refer to me as having the dreaded diarrhea of the mouth.    

post #55 of 164
Quote:

remember when the bride used all those dang charms on ribbons hidden in a shower cake

Yeah, but those were expected to be there. They knew they were going to be pulling a charm out. I don't know, I think those kind of things are nostalgic and traditional, and you're kind of a dummy if you eat one. There's a taco place here, a local institution mind you. They've been slinging rolled tacos for 50 years, and every one of them comes with the toothpick still in it. You take the toothpick out, then eat the taco. And if the toothpick somehow broke off, you break the taco at that point and dig it out. No way in heck would anyone ever walk this taco up to the counter and complain. They'd be met with looks of disbelief and the other patrons would probably laugh. Not really relevant, but a toothpick certainly ain't food, yet there it is, served to to the customer firmly implanted in food. :D

*Top 100 Designers in The USA, Brides Magazine, 2013*<---little ole' me!
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
*Top 100 Designers in The USA, Brides Magazine, 2013*<---little ole' me!
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
post #56 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZCouture View Post

Yeah, but those were expected to be there. They knew they were going to be pulling a charm out. I don't know, I think those kind of things are nostalgic and traditional, and you're kind of a dummy if you eat one. There's a taco place here, a local institution mind you. They've been slinging rolled tacos for 50 years, and every one of them comes with the toothpick still in it. You take the toothpick out, then eat the taco. And if the toothpick somehow broke off, you break the taco at that point and dig it out. No way in heck would anyone ever walk this taco up to the counter and complain. They'd be met with looks of disbelief and the other patrons would probably laugh. Not really relevant, but a toothpick certainly ain't food, yet there it is, served to to the customer firmly implanted in food. :D

 

 

true that

 

in our litigious society it always gave us pause though

 

and in our dd scenario and the galveston letter--

 

toothpicks surely are approved by the FDA to use on food products unlike our glitteratious hooligan dd

 

and i bet those charms were food safe because wilton with all it's mass market flaws, does err on the side of food safe

one baker's 'never ever do' is the next baker's 'i swear by this'
one baker's 'never ever do' is the next baker's 'i swear by this'
post #57 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by -K8memphis View Post

remember when the bride used all those dang charms on ribbons hidden in a shower cake

Sounds a lot like a New Orleans Mardi Gras king cake. Or something I read about in a James Joyce short story.

 

And if fear of lawsuit is the only reason you practice good food safety, you're probably in the wrong business: you should be practicing good food safety because you don't want to make anybody sick: because the very idea of making somebody sick horrifies you, and makes you want to do whatever it takes to make sure that if anybody gets sick from something you made, it's you.

 

And toothpicks, king cake charms, the items in a typical DecoPac kit, and the traditional flower-shaped birthday candle holders that nobody seems to stock any more, are not only made from food-safe materials; they're also designed to be easily and completely removed.


Edited by hbquikcomjamesl - 1/4/13 at 10:32am

James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

post #58 of 164

My husband works with a man who ordered a sandwich at a restaurant during a work-related dinner.  Everybody had a toothpick in their sandwich, but this man's toothpick did not have the little colored plastic thingy - it had fallen off.  So instead of using his brain, he bit into the sandwich.  Again, not using his brain, he continuted to chew (or not chew very well) with the toothpick in his mouth.  He then swallowed the toothpick and had to have it surgically removed.  A little brains and logic goes a long way.  If it's on your cake and it looks like glitter, any normal, rational person SHOULD think "Hey that looks like glitter, I'm not going to eat that".  It doesn't mean it should be banned from being a decoration.  Decorations are decorative.  If someone's brain doesn't function well enough to think, well then rainbow poo for them.  And if your child wants to eat it because it's shiny, any logical parent SHOULD say "no, that looks like glitter, we're not going to eat that". 

 

I can't even get a hot coffee at McDonalds anymore (they're warm enough, but not hot) because people aren't using their brains and understanding that "coffee=hot" and suing for their stupid mistakes.  One lady sent her 4 year old up to the counter to get her coffee refilled and then was SHOCKED when the little girl was burned.  Parent of the year.

 

Also DD on BC = gross. 

I homeschool because I've seen the village and I don't want it raising my children.

 

http://whynotethiopia2.blogspot.com/

 

 

I homeschool because I've seen the village and I don't want it raising my children.

 

http://whynotethiopia2.blogspot.com/

 

 

post #59 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by hbquikcomjamesl View Post

Sounds a lot like a New Orleans Mardi Gras king cake. Or something I read about in a James Joyce short story.

 

And if fear of lawsuit is the only reason you practice good food safety, you're probably in the wrong business: you should be practicing good food safety because you don't want to make anybody sick: because the very idea of making somebody sick horrifies you, and makes you want to do whatever it takes to make sure that if anybody gets sick from something you made, it's you.

 

And toothpicks, king cake charms, the items in a typical DecoPac kit, and the traditional flower-shaped birthday candle holders that nobody seems to stock any more, are not only made from food-safe materials; they're also designed to be easily and completely removed.

 

i'm uncomfortable with ad hominem temperature taking

 

i'm going to assume you mean the following even though you quoted my post first--

 

'And if fear of lawsuit is the only reason you practice one practices good food safety, you're that person is probably in the wrong business: you one should be practicing good food safety because you don't one doesn't want to make anybody sick: because..." and on

 

if fear of lawsuit is one's only motive, i'll take it over having no motive at all for safety

 

my motives for what it's worth -- important or unimportant are very clear from what i've been writing

 

the charms are safe to use--this still gave us pause due to jess 155's toothpick boy type cases and etc.

one baker's 'never ever do' is the next baker's 'i swear by this'
one baker's 'never ever do' is the next baker's 'i swear by this'
post #60 of 164

My husband found a hair in his salad once. I wouldn't want to eat that, or plastic either.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cake Decorating
This thread is locked  
Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Cake Decorating › For Those Who Feed Others Disco Dust