Crumb Coating

Decorating By vicky764 Updated 4 Jun 2014 , 11:14pm by cakebaby2

vicky764 Posted 31 May 2014 , 7:25pm
post #1 of 11

AHi all

I am making a 2 tier birthday cake and covering in fondant which I have done once before and turned out quite well.

Whats the best way to crumb coat with buttercream? I only put one layer on my last cake and left it for half hour before fondant covering. I have read that there should be 2 coats and you should chill the cake for 2 hours after each coating?

I do want a smooth finish but I don't think ill have the time to chill for that long as only got a few days to make and decorate the cake.

Any tips?

Thanks

10 replies
cakegrandma Posted 31 May 2014 , 10:25pm
post #2 of 11

All I ever do is apply a thin coat of icing, ganache or whatever you are using. Actually it is more than a crumb coat but not as much as the amount you would use if you were icing your cake for someone. I too set the iced cake in the fridge for at least an hour.  It allows the icing to chill and set up and since the icing is not thick then the icing will be fine to put fondant on. Good luck ;-)

nadiacorallo Posted 31 May 2014 , 11:09pm
post #3 of 11

AI always do a thin crumb coat to allow all the loose crumbs too adhere to something. Then I chill in the freezer for ten minutes because it chills it a lot faster than the fridge would. Then I add the thicker layer of buttercream etc. To the outside of the crumb coat and let that set in the fridge at least an hour. But if I'm in a rush to cover it with fondant, I put that in the freezer to set really quick. Another ten minutes or so. You don't want to freeze the cake, you just wanna set the outer layer quickly. I think the crumb coat is important. I made the mistake once of not doing it with a red velvet cake and my icing layer then had red crumbs in it and it showed up under the fondant. Hope this helps! :-)

kakeladi Posted 1 Jun 2014 , 1:21am
post #4 of 11

...........put one layer on my last cake and left it for half hour before fondant covering. I have read that there should be 2 coats and you should chill the cake for 2 hours after each coating?.................

 

There is a ton of *MISinformation* out there.

A crumb coat (sometimes referred to as 'dirty icing') is meant to lock the crumbs in so they do not mar the final coat of icing.  There should be NO NEED for 2 coats nor for a cake to chill after putting on a crumb coat.  It should dry to the touch within a minute or two so you can proceed.  If your crumb coat does not dry within a few minutes you need to thin it down.  Do you really think a busy cake shop would take the time to coat a cake, chill it for 2 hours, then repeat that *before* finally putting on a finish coating of icing - whether it be b'cream or fondant? :) 

 

For smaller cake especially, I often would take a bit of b'cream, melt it in the MicroWave oven (for maybe 10 seconds) and very quickly spread it all over the cake.  This will dry to a glaze (like on a glazed doughnut). 

When putting fondant on a cake the b'cream crumb coat should be wet, not dry so the fondant has something to stick to.  I've heard of some going though similar to what you mention (hours of letting the cake chill dry) then spritzing it w/water to hold the fondant.  IMHO What a waste of time! 

vicky764 Posted 1 Jun 2014 , 11:45am
post #5 of 11

AThanks so much for all the replies, you're completely right, google 'crumb coating' and there are a million ways people do it. I'll just stick to what I've been doing, I also thought the 'spraying with water' thing seemed pointless. Going to attempt to get the 2 tiers done and fondant covered tomorrow.

vicky764 Posted 1 Jun 2014 , 4:12pm
post #6 of 11

AThanks so much for all the replies, you're completely right, google 'crumb coating' and there are a million ways people do it. I'll just stick to what I've been doing, I also thought the 'spraying with water' thing seemed pointless. Going to attempt to get the 2 tiers done and fondant covered tomorrow.

johnbailey64 Posted 1 Jun 2014 , 10:37pm
post #7 of 11

I like to apply a crumb coat. I just put on a thin layer of icing to seal in the crumbs. I only wait a few minutes then add a regular coat of buttercream,  give that a few minutes then fondant.

 

My last cake, I tried the refrigerator method because I was trying to 'set' the buttercream - trying to practice getting the edges on the top straighter, less 'pillow'.  It may have helped some, but I did spritz it with water on the top and sides so my fondant would have something to stick to. The buttercream was completely dry.

 But I live in a humid climate and use either powdered sugar or cornstarch on the counter to roll out my fondant so the underside is dry and 'dusty' when I put it on.

cakegrandma Posted 2 Jun 2014 , 12:20am
post #8 of 11

I took lessons from Nick Lodge when I was in Atlanta and when he is going to roll a small amount of fond or gum paste he uses corn starch with a light hand.  If you are going to roll a large amount, to cover a cake, if you don't own a mat, you can put a very light amount of shortening on your counter. By a light coat I mean just so it looks like a sheen. Your fondant will roll out so much more easily.  Let us see your cake please, post a photo.

kakeladi Posted 2 Jun 2014 , 11:41pm
post #9 of 11

Yeah, what she ^^^ said :)   A very light coating of shortening is very useful.  But....it does depend on the climate where one lives as to which - shortening or cornstarch - to use.

vicky764 Posted 4 Jun 2014 , 9:15pm
post #10 of 11

AFollowed advice on here and this is the result, still have my cake toppers and other bits to go on but I am happy with the result for my first cake. :) [IMG]http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3246161/width/200/height/400[/IMG]

cakebaby2 Posted 4 Jun 2014 , 11:14pm
post #11 of 11

Looks great!

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