Raindrops Posted 27 Jan 2014 , 1:09pm
post #1 of

AHi everyone, I need your advice please. I am creating a 4 tiered wedding cake (my first one ever!) with cascading flowers from the top to the bottom. I have read on several posts not to insert wired sugar flowers directly into cakes but to use a straw or a flower pick. Several comments I read did mention that the weight of the sugar flowers in the flower picks may rip the fondant, hence why I am leaning more on the side of using straws. I intend to create the wired sugar flowers, insert into a straw then individually insert into the cakes to create the arrangement (do you think this is a good idea?). Also what size is the straw to use please? I am leaning into the cocktail sipping straw, is this a reasonable size or should I aim for something with a bigger diameter? Does anyone have a picture of type of straw they use or a process of creating the cascading flowers using the flower picks or straw? Many thanks for your help and PS- cake central rocks!!!

27 replies
cupcakemaker Posted 27 Jan 2014 , 6:40pm
post #2 of

AI need to do the same thing so ill watch this with interest!

MoonlitSammy Posted 27 Jan 2014 , 9:53pm
post #3 of

That's really interesting.  I tend to make 3D sculpted cakes but am looking to doing some delicate flowers on cakes (just to improve skill level really).  I always thought you use flower picks as not supposed to put anything metal in cakes due to Food Safety aspects...never considered the weight would rip the fondant -so many thanks for the 'heads up'!  I will also be watching this thread with interest ;-D

MBalaska Posted 28 Jan 2014 , 12:49am
post #4 of

What are the 'flower picks' made of?

costumeczar Posted 28 Jan 2014 , 1:17am
post #5 of

I would use coffee stirs, that way the straws won't take up too much of the cake when you insert them in.

JWinslow Posted 28 Jan 2014 , 4:42am
post #6 of

I have a couple different sizes but I found cocktail straws in the grocery store that are perfect.  You can also get them on amazon.  You might want to consider having some royal icing or melted chocolate to help anchor the flowers. 

Raindrops Posted 28 Jan 2014 , 10:36am
post #7 of

A@MBalaska- the flower picks are made of plastic, but I assumed that the weight of the flowers in the flower pick was what was causing the fondant to tear?!

@ Costumeczar- dumb question, but when you say coffee stir I am slightly confused, as the ones I have seen tend not to be a tube, so there is no place to insert the wires from the sugar flowers into.

@ J Winslow- thank you for that tip, I thought the cocktail straws would be ideal as well because of their size as they wouldnt take too much space. Will definitely anchor with royal icing as recommended, you can never be too careful. might use the flower picks to arrange a posy for the top tier...

thank you all for all your responses, means a lot.

costumeczar Posted 28 Jan 2014 , 11:16am
post #8 of

A

Original message sent by Raindrops

@MBalaska- the flower picks are made of plastic, but I assumed that the weight of the flowers in the flower pick was what was causing the fondant to tear?!

@ Costumeczar- dumb question, but when you say coffee stir I am slightly confused, as the ones I have seen tend not to be a tube, so there is no place to insert the wires from the sugar flowers into.

@ J Winslow- thank you for that tip, I thought the cocktail straws would be ideal as well because of their size as they wouldnt take too much space. Will definitely anchor with royal icing as recommended, you can never be too careful. might use the flower picks to arrange a posy for the top tier...

thank you all for all your responses, means a lot.

Cocktail straws and coffee stirs are probably the same thing, just different widths. The ones that I found for coffee are kind of flat but they have a tube inside that's wide enough to insert a wire into, so it's tight. They basically cover the wire and leave no extra room there. You can find them in different sizes, I'm sure. I also have some white ones that are plain straws, just a little larger than the ones for coffee.

JWinslow Posted 28 Jan 2014 , 4:35pm
post #9 of

As costumeczar posted - "so they are tight" is important. You don't want the straws to stay in the cake when the flowers are removed if possible.    You may need to use a little royal icing/chocolate to make sure the straw is tight on the flower if it's loose. 

 

Jeanne

Raindrops Posted 28 Jan 2014 , 7:38pm

A

Original message sent by JWinslow

As costumeczar posted - "so they are tight" is important. You don't want the straws to stay in the cake when the flowers are removed if possible.    You may need to use a little royal icing/chocolate to make sure the straw is tight on the flower if it's loose. 

Jeanne

Original message sent by costumeczar

Cocktail straws and coffee stirs are probably the same thing, just different widths. The ones that I found for coffee are kind of flat but they have a tube inside that's wide enough to insert a wire into, so it's tight. They basically cover the wire and leave no extra room there. You can find them in different sizes, I'm sure. I also have some white ones that are plain straws, just a little larger than the ones for coffee.

I have managed to locate some sipping straws that are 4.3mm across and 5.5inches long! hopefully that should do the trick. I will try and secure with royal icing (I guess the next challenge will be stuffing the straw with enough royal icing to secure the flowers). Thanks for your advise.

cakebaby2 Posted 1 Feb 2014 , 6:05pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by Raindrops 

Hi everyone, I need your advice please. I am creating a 4 tiered wedding cake (my first one ever!) with cascading flowers from the top to the bottom. I have read on several posts not to insert wired sugar flowers directly into cakes but to use a straw or a flower pick. Several comments I read did mention that the weight of the sugar flowers in the flower picks may rip the fondant, hence why I am leaning more on the side of using straws. I intend to create the wired sugar flowers, insert into a straw then individually insert into the cakes to create the arrangement (do you think this is a good idea?).
Also what size is the straw to use please? I am leaning into the cocktail sipping straw, is this a reasonable size or should I aim for something with a bigger diameter?
Does anyone have a picture of type of straw they use or a process of creating the cascading flowers using the flower picks or straw?
Many thanks for your help and PS- cake central rocks!!!

 

The cake I'm going to be doing sounds like this, its a "homage" to Peggy Porschen's Avalanche cake. Most of the flowers on my cake will be flush with the sides and top and only those that have to be clustered like hydrangeas and stephanotis will be in flower picks. I figure the less holes in this beast the better!

cupcakemaker Posted 2 Feb 2014 , 9:16am

A

Original message sent by cakebaby2

The cake I'm going to be doing sounds like this, its a "homage" to Peggy Porschen's Avalanche cake. Most of the flowers on my cake will be flush with the sides and top and only those that have to be clustered like hydrangeas and stephanotis will be in flower picks. I figure the less holes in this beast the better!

And will you attach those with royal icing?

cakebaby2 Posted 2 Feb 2014 , 10:10am

Quote:

Originally Posted by cupcakemaker 


And will you attach those with royal icing?

Hi cupcakemaker, yes they will be attached with royal icing, the first batch of flowers were a bit heavy so I am keeping them for the bottom of the bottom of the "waterfall" around the base. I thought of wiring them into a circlet and arranging them around the drum. It might give the staff at the venue less problems when they take it away to cut it and them my daughter can have the circlet as a keepsake. The wedding is September of this year so I've been churning out flowers since the engagement was announced. I'm sure there will be lots of breakages during assembly (between tears and shaky hands ) so I'm trying to get ahead of the game 

cakebaby2 Posted 2 Feb 2014 , 11:00am

Quote:

Originally Posted by cupcakemaker 


And will you attach those with royal icing?

I'm also going to make a cake topper from half a styrofoam ball by covering it in fondant  that way covered wires can be pushed directly into it to make a full arrangent to overflow the top tier. It can then be easily removed. I've made these toppers for birthday cakes and they give the illusion of a full bouquet without anything actually being pushed into the cake.So much can go wrong as I've been reading in all these wonderful threads. So it may be a cop out but its a big project for me,

cupcakemaker Posted 2 Feb 2014 , 11:06am

ASounds fab! I did a small arrangement the other day with a ball of fondant on top. I like the idea of styrofoam though! [IMG]http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3178587/width/200/height/400[/IMG]

cakebaby2 Posted 2 Feb 2014 , 11:22am

That's gorgeous and just the same idea really. The ball is good because they come in different sizes and you can arrange your wires around the rim to cascade down the sides of the cake as well as have your heavier flowers in the centre to stabilise it. Your cake and flowers are lovely, so much talent on here. every time I did a cake related search on Google I was directed here so I figured I may as well join !

cupcakemaker Posted 2 Feb 2014 , 11:48am

AI love this site! So, if you hang flowers from the side of one to go down the cake do you use anything to stick them in with? Just worried the wires may pull out?

cakebaby2 Posted 2 Feb 2014 , 12:04pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by cupcakemaker 

I love this site! So, if you hang flowers from the side of one to go down the cake do you use anything to stick them in with? Just worried the wires may pull out?

If the flowers are light,say a small spray hydrangea or a little cluster of cherry blossom they should be fine and the styrofoam lets you push the wires firmly in, you could even hot glue it, no one is eating this baby?

If for example you were using a spray of roses on a stem and it was a little heavier you could attach the closest flower flush to the cake  underneath with royal icing. Just make the arrangement balanced so the weight is evenly distributed.

I always attach a few of my unwired filler flowers firston top of each other slightly so you build up the dome shape. That way the wiring is kept to a minimum and a big statement peony or similar on top with R I.That would give support to anything you wire say small ivy leaves cascading down.

N.B I am a homebaker . I am a florist to trade and I hope I'm not overstepping myself here by posting advice to truly artistic people but i love all things floral, edible or not and I always do cakes for my girls this way. If I ever learn how to take pics and upload them I will.

cupcakemaker Posted 2 Feb 2014 , 12:50pm

AOf course you aren't! I'm grateful for your help. Not sure what you mean with the unwired ones so pics would be helpful! I use the mobile site and push the mountain icon to upload from my phone. Third icon along.

cupcakemaker Posted 2 Feb 2014 , 12:51pm

A[IMG]http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3178613/width/200/height/400[/IMG]

cakebaby2 Posted 2 Feb 2014 , 1:10pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by cupcakemaker 
 
Lol Lol Lol! My kids would be howling if they could see this! My er aversion to the 21st century and technical gadgets is a family joke. I have a basic Nokia which the kids say would embarrass a five year old, no camera, no tunes no colours. My son in law does all my photography for portfolio's etc. My area is so remote we don't even have broadband. What I mean by unwired flowers are the little blossoms you make and frill say hydrangea?
Just build them up , not stacked but offset until you are happy with how it looks then fix with RI. You'll find you've covered a significant area esp if you now add a rose or peony.
Now you add a wired one slightly offset so it peeps over the side of the top tier, more "fillers" can be iced to the side of the cake just under the spray not only supporting the one cascading from underneath but adding the "waterfall" effect. If you look at Peggy Porschen's Avalanche cake.....not that I'm copying this image. Heaven forfend! You'll see what I mean. Very few of those flowers are actually sticking into the cake.My daughter loved this cake but not the colours as her bouquet is more elegant than "country". 
 
 
cakebaby2 Posted 2 Feb 2014 , 1:22pm

Obviously I mean the topper. Have a look at the hydrangea one as well, its gorgeous.

cakebaby2 Posted 2 Feb 2014 , 1:32pm

Just had another idea, you can buy styrofoam wreath bases in 8" upwards size. it could be neat to decorate them and then just slip them over the tiers, they practically weigh nothing and if was delicate blossoms it might be good to have a few of them under your belt even just for displays on dummies at wedding fairs?

cupcakemaker Posted 2 Feb 2014 , 2:49pm

AI'll have a look. I know what unwired flowers are but wasn't following what you were saying.

cupcakemaker Posted 2 Feb 2014 , 2:56pm

A[IMG]http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3178667/width/200/height/400[/IMG][IMG]http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3178668/width/200/height/400[/IMG]

I'm making a 3 tier wedding cake inspired by these!

cupcakemaker Posted 2 Feb 2014 , 2:57pm

AI want to add some wired flowers because they look so pretty. My friend (the bride) isn't very helpful and basically says 'whatever'!

cupcakemaker Posted 2 Feb 2014 , 3:00pm

A[IMG]http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3178671/width/200/height/400[/IMG] I love this one too!

Raindrops Posted 16 May 2014 , 10:42am

Hi everyone, I thought that I should come back to provide feedback on how I got on. I decided to use straws and royal icing to attach the sugarflowers to the cake. It seemed to be more economical than flower posy and left smaller holes in the cake. Thank you all for your advice and comments, I found it to be extremely useful. Here is a picture of the wedding cake, there are several things I would do differently next time, but for my first wedding/stacked cakes, I think it looks okay. Oh, but the bride loved it, which made all the stress worth while.  

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%