Crumb Coating For Beginner!

Decorating By Nikkisun Updated 17 Oct 2009 , 3:57pm by CarolAnn

Nikkisun Posted 15 Oct 2009 , 11:26am
post #1 of 18

I'm new to this cake baking game and have decided to make cakes for my kids birthdays this weekend.

After extensive reading I now realise what a crumb coat is!!

Several questions:

Do I need a crusting bc or non-crusting bc for a crumb coating to go under rolled fondant?

How thick does the coating need to be?

How long do I need to leave between applying the crumb coat and putting on the rolled fondant?

Thanks for reading (I'm sure I'll be back with more questions!!).

17 replies
Rylan Posted 15 Oct 2009 , 11:35am
post #2 of 18

I'm confused about your questions. When you say crumbcoat, do you mean the final icing (under fondant) of the cake? Because crumbcoat is a light layer of icing before the final coat.

Do I need a crusting bc or non-crusting bc for a crumb coating to go under rolled fondant?
-No it doesn't need to be crusting.

How thick does the coating need to be?
-It really depends on you. When I used to use buttercream, it was basically just a thicker crumbcoat.

How long do I need to leave between applying the crumb coat and putting on the rolled fondant?
-Many people have different methods. If I use a crusting buttercream, I will let it crust before I put the rolled fondant--but remember, there are people who just put it right away and they still have perfect looking cakes.

scionmom Posted 15 Oct 2009 , 11:36am
post #3 of 18

The crumb coat does not need to be that thick, in fact when i do mine you can still see some of the cake through it. When i do a crumb coat, i usually just let it sit for about 30 minutes, not long at all but if I am correct I dont think that that time matters. And also about the crusting or non crusting, that is totally up to you... depending on what taste you want. Enjoy and be ready to become obsessed with cakes!! LOL! HTH!

cakesrock Posted 15 Oct 2009 , 11:42am
post #4 of 18

Do I need a crusting bc or non-crusting bc for a crumb coating to go under rolled fondant?
I USE NON-CRUSTING BUT BELIEVE ITS A MATTER OF PREFERENCE. I ALSO PUT IT IN THE FRIDGE TO 'SETTLE' FOR AN HOUR OR 2 OR EVEN OVERNIGHT (THAT IS BEST, I THINK) BECAUSE I DO THE CRUMB COAT AND FILL AT THE SAME TIME

How thick does the coating need to be? THIN- YOU CAN SEE THROUGH- JUST ENOUGH TO COVER THE CAKE. DON'T WORRY IF THE CRUMBS GET ALL MIXED IN - THAT'S THE POINT.

How long do I need to leave between applying the crumb coat and putting on the rolled fondant? YOU HAVE TO PUT FONDANT ON RIGHT AWAY. BUT AFTER I PULL THE CAKE OUT OF THE FRIDGE CRUMB-COATED AND FILLED, I DO ANOTHER THICKER COAT OF BC, SMOOTH AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE (USE A SPATULA WARMED WITH HOT WATER TO SMOOTH) AND THEN APPLY THE FONDANT ONCE I HAVE A SMOOTH SURFACE. MAKE SURE YOUR FONDANT IS ROLLED AND READY AS YOU ARE APPLYING YOUR 2ND COAT OF BC.
THAT'S HOW I DO IT, BUT I'M SURE MANY OTHERS HAVE A DIFFERENT TECHNIQUES THEY CAN OFFER UP. I'VE TRIED DIFFERENT WAYS, BUT FIND THIS WORKS FOR ME. YOU'LL FIND THE WAY THAT WORKS BEST FOR YOU!

THERE ARE SEVERAL TUTORIALS (IE UTUBE) THAT YOU CAN WATCH TO SEE EXACTLY HOW IT'S DONE- IT HELPS! A BEGINNER COURSE THROUGH WILTON OR SCHOOL BOARD OR COOKING PROGRAM HELPS TOO!

Thanks for reading (I'm sure I'll be back with more questions!!).
I HAVE RECEIVED A LOT OF ASSISTANCE FROM THIS WEBSITE AND GREAT IDEAS! I READ THROUGH THE FORUM FOR TIPS AND SEE WHAT WORKS AND DOESN'T FOR OTHERS, THEN TRY IT! HAPPY BAKING!

Nikkisun Posted 15 Oct 2009 , 11:49am
post #5 of 18

Thanks everyone. Think I am confusing myself here - I thought I just put on a crumb coating and then put on the rolled fondant but reading your replies I'm guessing I need to do a crumb coat then a layer of bc and then the rolled fondant????

Can someone talk me through exactly what I need to do and in what order as I'd hate to get it wrong!

Thanks.

Rylan Posted 15 Oct 2009 , 12:04pm
post #6 of 18

I hope I can give a clear explanation. =]

1. Crumbcoat
2. Let the crumbcoat crust
3. Put the final layer of icing
4. Smooth
5. Let it crust, moisten (brush with a bit of water, dilluted corn syrup or even watered down jam) it just a bit so the fondant can stick

OR

you can put the fondant before it even crusts and skip the "moisten" step.

Of course many people have many ways to do it. If I use a crusting buttercream, I skip the crumbcoating part and just put the final layer of icing.

Nikkisun Posted 15 Oct 2009 , 12:07pm
post #7 of 18

Thank you. I'm glad I asked or I would have missed out a layer of bc!!

Rylan Posted 15 Oct 2009 , 12:11pm
post #8 of 18

No problem.

Well you don't really need to do 2 coats of icing. I usually use a final layer which is basically a thick crumbcoat. The one thing you have to make sure is to have a nice, clean and smooth base for the fondant to lay on.

Check out the first tutorial link on my signature. It will show you different steps on how to ice a cake.

Nikkisun Posted 15 Oct 2009 , 12:16pm
post #9 of 18

Thanks - I'm at work now and can't get onto You Tube so will have a look when I get home.

crazydoglady Posted 15 Oct 2009 , 9:51pm
post #10 of 18

i like to have a thicker layer of buttercream because not everyone likes the taste of fondant. for those who peel off the fondant, there is still a layer of buttercream to eat with the cake.

Nikkisun Posted 16 Oct 2009 , 9:47am
post #11 of 18

I'd just like to say a HUGE thanks to everone that helped me. I now have 2 cakes (an Apple logo and a golf ball) sitting on my kitchen table. They're nowhere near professional standard (and definitely not as good as all the lovely cakes on this site) but considering the most I've previously managed to bake is a cupcake I'm pretty pleased with the results (and hopefully the kids will be happy when they get them later today)!! icon_biggrin.gif

crazydoglady Posted 16 Oct 2009 , 1:44pm
post #12 of 18

good for you nikkisun!!

grandmom Posted 16 Oct 2009 , 4:16pm
post #13 of 18

Take and post photos, please!! It's fun to watch skills grow as you peruse other users' photos.

Nikkisun Posted 16 Oct 2009 , 8:06pm
post #14 of 18

Have posted photos! Cakes must have been ok cos they've been mostly eaten now!!

crazydoglady Posted 16 Oct 2009 , 8:21pm
post #15 of 18

very well done!!!

grandmom Posted 17 Oct 2009 , 10:44am
post #16 of 18

OMG - both kids have the same birthday?? And I used to whine when mine were little because they were 20 days apart!!

Good job on the cakes. Keep caking and keep posting!

crazydoglady Posted 17 Oct 2009 , 3:16pm
post #17 of 18

at the risk of seeming like i want to outdo everyone - my three kids were born within four days of one another.

CarolAnn Posted 17 Oct 2009 , 3:57pm
post #18 of 18

I had b/g twins when my oldest was 2 1/2, so that cut out one cake. LOL

Back to the crumb coat - the purpose of the crumb coat is to plaster the crumbs (after you've brushed the side of the cake of course) to the cake so they don't get mixed into your icing and show through. I use whatever icing I will be using on the cake. A very thin layer should be all that's needed. Let it sit (refrigerated or not) and set before going on to do the final icing. The point is to glue the crumbs to the cake, not to make them disappear. If you'll get into the habit of crumb coating it can save you a lot of trouble and frustration AND icing, because you won't have to mess around picking out or covering the crumbs floating on or just under the surface of your icing. I also refer to it as spackling, because this is when you get to fill all the cracks/irregularities in the side of your cakes. Have a tear getting the cake out of the pan? Spackle it like you would a wall, by filling it with icing and smooth it along with the side of your cake. No one will ever guess it was ever anything less than perfect.

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