Prank? Or Just Too Fishy?

Business By spottydog Updated 7 Apr 2009 , 11:25pm by __Jamie__

spottydog Posted 6 Apr 2009 , 1:35pm
post #1 of 24

I have heard on here that some of you have recieved this email...or similar. Here is the email I recieved. Note : The name? LOL


Hello, My name is james and my Fiancee name is brown. We are Having Our wedding in your city,the date of our wedding is on may 24th 2009.They are still working on the venue and as soon as the venue is ready i will let you know. Your services Are needed for our wedding,i want you to give me your fee,we will be in USA on (19/5/2009) by then the contract will have been finished because am in U.K now for business. Am a citizen and my Fiancee is from U.K.Looking forward to read from you soon.get back to me on this email address [email protected]
JAMES......




I was wondering if this was the same prank and or trying to rip me off?

23 replies
cheferyn Posted 6 Apr 2009 , 1:38pm
post #2 of 24

yes. delete it and don't open any more from this person.

springlakecake Posted 6 Apr 2009 , 1:39pm
post #3 of 24

It does sound a little fishy to me!

Wendl Posted 6 Apr 2009 , 1:39pm
post #4 of 24

I say it's of the fishy variety and don't trust it. The sender's spelling and grammar are wretched - not that everyone's is perfect, this one is just too "Nigerian Scam E-mail"-like.
If you want, e-mail him to find out where he heard about you.
Wendl

spottydog Posted 6 Apr 2009 , 1:40pm
post #5 of 24

Thankyou..... icon_smile.gif

springlakecake Posted 6 Apr 2009 , 1:41pm
post #6 of 24

Oh and especially because he doesn't have a venue yet? The reason he is "getting back to you" is because he doesnt know the name of any venues!

springlakecake Posted 6 Apr 2009 , 1:42pm
post #7 of 24

oh and if he was a citizen of USA he wouldnt write the date (day/month/year) since we all write month/day/year here.

Brownie1954 Posted 6 Apr 2009 , 1:44pm
post #8 of 24

You may want to watch out for this one too....Someone emails me and wants a wedding cake. The words are jumbled, and the email blabs on about how many tiers they want, what flavors, and could the tiers be put in boxes so they can pick them up.....I read it the first time I got it, as I thought it was legit, but once I read it the first time, I knew something was stupid about it, and just delete it, if I get it again.

all4cake Posted 6 Apr 2009 , 1:47pm
post #9 of 24

James Brown....lol...is he out of jail? WHOA! I FEEEEEEEEEEEL NICE! LIKE SUGAR AND SPICE!


edited to say...although, according to the press, he has alcohol issues and if this were James Brown that might be the reason for the ill-typed/written email....I would agree with the others...it's of the fishy sort.

edited again to say....oh, please, forgive me...I didn't know he had passed (or maybe I did and forgot)...I wouldn't have been ribbin' like that had I remembered.

KitchenKat Posted 6 Apr 2009 , 1:50pm
post #10 of 24

Everything about it shouts S C A M!

jammjenks Posted 6 Apr 2009 , 1:55pm
post #11 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by all4cake

James Brown....lol...is he out of jail? WHOA! I FEEEEEEEEEEEL NICE! LIKE SUGAR AND SPICE!


edited to say...although, according to the press, he has alcohol issues and if this were James Brown that might be the reason for the ill-typed/written email....I would agree with the others...it's of the fishy sort.




icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

Debluvs2bake Posted 6 Apr 2009 , 1:57pm
post #12 of 24

Looks to me like they used an online translator hence the broken and jumbled wording. Wouldn't trust it though.

amandasweetcakes Posted 6 Apr 2009 , 3:10pm
post #13 of 24

I actually just received a very similar email. Different name, but they were from the uk and hadn't secured a venue yet. I definitely was leary about the email, I haven't responded yet, but was going to say no.

I have also received an email and phone call on 2 different occasions where the customer clearly does not speak english and wants a cake and says they will have a delivery truck sent to my location for pick up. Both times I said no. The phone call was very strange, I actually had to speak through an interpreter (like for the hearing impaired) and the person on the other end of the call would not accept no for an answer. It was strange, I felt like I couldn't just hang up becasue I had this poor translator caught in the middle. After they finally got it, we hung up and they called back 10 minutes later. Once I saw the caller ID, needless to say I did not answer.

What in the world could these people be up to??? icon_confused.gif

jlynnw Posted 6 Apr 2009 , 3:24pm
post #14 of 24

Scam goes like this,

I want you make me cake. I set for venue and flowers with clergy. I send you check/money order/other form of pmt and you pay these people at this addresses. Keep the balance for you work and time to pay others. I appreciate you doing for me.

Ya, it is misspelled with intent. They have you cash a phoney send your payment to PO or legit address with a forward to PO that they pick up and you're stuck with a bounced check/payment. The found you by internet, cake site, refered by a friend/venue. The get your name and won't let go. The think anyone will fall for it. I guess for every NO they must get a YES as this has been going on for a while. I was concerned when I was contacte because I do not operate out of the house except for friends and family I "gift" cakes to. Call the police to check it out, the fraud division, and they have this on record.

all4cake Posted 6 Apr 2009 , 3:25pm
post #15 of 24

what if, and it would be too cool if one existed too, when they call or email, we could give them the response like....

I'm sorry I'm unavailable but here's a number to a bakery that should be able to assist you ....and it be a prank number of someone yelling out profanities...

or give them the number to the local police station

costumeczar Posted 7 Apr 2009 , 3:06am
post #16 of 24

A couple of us were messing with some of these guys last week, and we had them emailing us for a while. If you want to amuse yourself, ask them if they want the traditional jelly rolls with the cake, and what flavor, twinkleberry or toejam? Then when they reply, tell them that they need to use the special self-freezing boxes made from styroplosion reticulating plastic to transport the cakes. They'll email you back again You then tell them that you only accept payment in advance in cash, and that they have to be shipped FedEx. For some reason, they stop emailing you then icon_biggrin.gif

JGMB Posted 7 Apr 2009 , 3:22am
post #17 of 24

A charity I work for got an e-mail last week, claiming to be from a 62-year old woman who is dying. She claimed that she wanted to donate the 5 1/2 MILLION dollars that her husband worked so hard for.

We're waiting to see if she follows up with another e-mail asking for our banking information so that she can direct-deposit her millions. LOL!!!!!!!!! icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

Chef_Stef Posted 7 Apr 2009 , 7:33am
post #18 of 24

Maybe its me, but I can tell if I am hearing from an actual bride or some phisher. Real brides give me a phone number, usually local, and I can call them to chat, and scammers sound...well...exactly like this.

LOVE the idea of messing with them though!LOL. I may have to use that one...

Alaskahsm Posted 7 Apr 2009 , 7:59am
post #19 of 24

Yes I believe it is a scam, however to the person that pointed out the date issue, military writes the date like this. Being a military wife I can't stand it icon_smile.gif

loriana Posted 7 Apr 2009 , 7:40pm
post #20 of 24

Ok folks, I've said it a million times and I'll say it again. And again, to protect everyone:

Do NOT respond, even once to these emails. They are 100% scams. Look for:

->Broken English
->Extreme thankfulness for helping. Willingness to take twinkleberry fillings and jellyrolls (Costumeczar is the only one who is exempt from ignoring these scam emails: she is a smart cookie who knows what she is doing and making herself very happy messing with them--we've talked about it haha!)
->day/month/year format in original post (as another poster said)
->Telling you they are US Citizens. Someone who IS a US Citizen doesn't go around talking about it. Think about it....
->Unusually flexible requests for simple stuff like "3-tier vanilla cake with 'congradulation on wedding' written on it".
->Willingness to pay up front from the get-go

The scam is two-fold: 1) they get you to respond. They mark your email as "live" 2) for every 1000 of these emails, one gullible person starting transactions with the scammer. Money is made

The "Live" email addresses are sold from scammer agency to scammer. If an email IS found live, scammer one gets paid from scammer two who tries a new tactic. Live emails are extremely useful. Someone has probably graphed the culpability level of "live" email addresses compared to "cold" email addresses.

Moral: Do NOT reply. Even once. Hit delete. When you reply, you mark yourself as "live". Don't reply, don't engage.

Hope this helps someone.....please be smart people. The economy is bad, we all need business but you don't need business this badly! Keep your wits about you. Use common sense.

costumeczar Posted 7 Apr 2009 , 10:51pm
post #21 of 24

I'm totally suspicious about everybody, hee hee! The only reason that I responded to the scammer was that he used my email address that was all over my website, so there wasn't a question about whether it was a live address or not. If someone emails with a random "You just won the British lottery!" email I do NOT respond, since that has nothing to do with cake. I assume that these cake scammers are targeting businesses specifically since they all give us orders for a happy marriage life cake.

My sister-in-law, who works at an online shoe warehouse, says that they always get emails ordering boots with a two-day rush. Those are the scams they get, so I have to figure that there are people who fish on websites for business email addresses. It's the hit or miss ones that you should definitely ignore, they're just hoping that someone will respond.

Would anyone like twinkeberry jam with that advice? icon_biggrin.gif

FromScratch Posted 7 Apr 2009 , 10:59pm
post #22 of 24

I'd prefer the toejam thank you muchly! icon_wink.gif

scoutmamma Posted 7 Apr 2009 , 11:19pm
post #23 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

A couple of us were messing with some of these guys last week, and we had them emailing us for a while. If you want to amuse yourself, ask them if they want the traditional jelly rolls with the cake, and what flavor, twinkleberry or toejam? Then when they reply, tell them that they need to use the special self-freezing boxes made from styroplosion reticulating plastic to transport the cakes. They'll email you back again You then tell them that you only accept payment in advance in cash, and that they have to be shipped FedEx. For some reason, they stop emailing you then icon_biggrin.gif




OM Goodness! That is hilarious!!!

__Jamie__ Posted 7 Apr 2009 , 11:25pm
post #24 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by merissa

It does sound a little fishy to me!




icon_confused.gif A little?? That reeks of scam from the first sentence! icon_biggrin.gif

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