Is Tuk-N-Ruffle Even Used Anymore?

Decorating By cakeryluv Updated 12 May 2008 , 4:27am by joy5678

cakeryluv Posted 8 May 2008 , 6:34pm
post #1 of 32

I'm building my supplies and I'm wondering how often you Tuk-n-Ruffle your cakes? At the bakery we were required to use it for any round cake, but I sure haven't seen it used much lately. Is it too old-school and out of style?

31 replies
levinea Posted 8 May 2008 , 7:29pm
post #2 of 32

I'm fairly new to decorating, but I really think that it's out of style now. I haven't seen these on cake boards in years. It might look right around a cake that was really frilly with lots of RI work or flowers, but for cakes with cleaner designs, I just never see them used.

chutzpah Posted 8 May 2008 , 7:42pm
post #3 of 32

Haven't you heard?? The 80s called and they're demanding their tuk-n-ruffle back!!!

Amymnn Posted 8 May 2008 , 7:48pm
post #4 of 32

Add me to yet another dork list. icon_biggrin.gif
I use it for fancier cakes.

LNW Posted 8 May 2008 , 7:52pm
post #5 of 32

I actually saw two older women battling it out for a tuk-n-ruffle kit at Hobby Lobby once. So yeah there are some folks who still use them but Iâve always considered them totally old fashioned. I wouldnât waste my money. If someone ever requests it you can always pick it up later. I highly doubt it will ever come up though.

darandon Posted 8 May 2008 , 8:05pm
post #6 of 32

I saw a box at michaels, tucked up on the top shelf collecting dust. I haven't seen it on a cake in years in my area.

Tootall Posted 8 May 2008 , 8:20pm
post #7 of 32

I don't even know what it IS! icon_lol.gif Seriously... What is it? icon_confused.gif

janebrophy Posted 8 May 2008 , 8:21pm
post #8 of 32

Maybe someone should start the fad back up again! I've never actually seen it used, though. icon_smile.gif

leah_s Posted 8 May 2008 , 8:37pm
post #9 of 32

I haven't seen it used in years either. I think I used it once because a bride specifically requested it, but that was years ago.

joaaaann Posted 8 May 2008 , 8:37pm
post #10 of 32

It's a long lace trim that usually comes in a 'ream' that you unroll and you cut to length to fit around your cake base. You take a small tool and 'tuck' the edges up under the edge of the cake base and it looks like the cake was set on top of a completely lace covered cake board.

cakeryluv Posted 8 May 2008 , 8:40pm
post #11 of 32

It's interesting because I know the bakery I used to work at still uses it, but I know I haven't seen it used around here in anyone's photos (or other sites) in a long time. Good to know, I'll save my cash for much more fun things!!! icon_biggrin.gif

Woole2 Posted 8 May 2008 , 8:45pm
post #12 of 32

I use it for making diaper cakes.

tiptop57 Posted 8 May 2008 , 8:57pm
post #13 of 32

Maybe we can take all the old ones and recycle and reuse by making door cozies to keep the draft out of Northern states during the winter months. icon_lol.gif
icon_biggrin.gif******I know, bad joke******** icon_biggrin.gif

cakeryluv Posted 8 May 2008 , 9:18pm
post #14 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiptop57

Maybe we can take all the old ones and recycle and reuse by making door cozies to keep the draft out of Northern states during the winter months. icon_lol.gif
icon_biggrin.gif******I know, bad joke******** icon_biggrin.gif




LOL! icon_lol.gif I sure could have used them during this crummy loooooong winter here! icon_biggrin.gif

mmgiles Posted 8 May 2008 , 9:46pm
post #15 of 32

It's going to be 90 degrees here this weekend. I say let it stay on the shelf collecting dust lol.

luelue1971 Posted 9 May 2008 , 12:51pm
post #16 of 32

I've used it on 2 of my cakes. ONe was a Christmas wedding cake and it matched the bride's topper perfectly. I also used it on a mini cake for a honeymoon cake for a friend. Thats the white on with the calla lillies in my photos.

rebekahjohnson81 Posted 9 May 2008 , 4:49pm
post #17 of 32

the bakery that made my wedding cake used it ... hehe icon_smile.gificon_redface.gif i've been reading all the old Wilton cake yearbooks in my library and they're all over the place in the books from the 70s icon_biggrin.gif i think they're kitschy cute

tiptop57 Posted 9 May 2008 , 5:05pm
post #18 of 32

Hmmm well you know what they say....."What old is new again."

cakeryluv Posted 9 May 2008 , 5:14pm
post #19 of 32

LOL! Well, that would explain it...that bakery is pretty well stuck in the 70's. I seriously doubt a single thing has changed there since then!

bookwithmenb Posted 9 May 2008 , 5:26pm
post #20 of 32

I just made a wedding cake for my daughter this past September and I used it icon_surprised.gif . I think it turned out quite elegant. She was pleased too. thumbs_up.gif

cakeryluv Posted 9 May 2008 , 7:02pm
post #21 of 32

I used it on my sister's wedding cake two years ago too (pic in my gallery) and she loved it. icon_biggrin.gif

SugarMama602 Posted 9 May 2008 , 8:03pm
post #22 of 32

I'm making a replica of my parents-in-law's wedding cake for their 40th anniversary. I'll be using one for that...but otherwise, I haven't seem them used since I was a little kid!

tiptop57 Posted 9 May 2008 , 8:30pm
post #23 of 32

What a cute pooch in your avatar SugarMama602!

SugarMama602 Posted 10 May 2008 , 3:13am
post #24 of 32

Thank you!! His name is Lefty.

littlecake Posted 10 May 2008 , 3:29am
post #25 of 32

i think it's used more for buttercream cakes....don't most of the people here use fondant?

i still use it on some stuff....other people must use it too....because decopac is sold out sometimes.

Cake_Princess Posted 10 May 2008 , 3:30am
post #26 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by chutzpah

Haven't you heard?? The 80s called and they're demanding their tuk-n-ruffle back!!!





LOL

CShields Posted 10 May 2008 , 4:29am
post #27 of 32

Since including the tuk-n-ruffle was a part of the last instruction in making the Wilton wedding cake, I have since that time, which was long ago, just asked the customer, "Do you want me to include a ruffle at the base of your wedding/formal cake?" Strangely, the bride/groom customers always say, "Oh, yes!" I figure that since it is their dollar I will just do the cake however they desire (within reason, of course). I just referred back to my wedding/formal cakes and they show that old ruffle. This was my latest one the end of last year - http://www.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1152273 For anyone not knowing what the tuk-n-ruffle is referring to, you can find a number of them in my wedding/formal photos. Due to requests, I put them on the cakes. Truthfully I believe this wedding rehearsal cake would have looked a little strange without the ruffle (http://www.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1152273). It was supposed to have a formal effect.

norma20 Posted 10 May 2008 , 3:29pm
post #28 of 32

OMG! Isn't it some PLASTIC ruffle that is still around??? icon_confused.gif
If the answer is yes, Martha Stewart would NEVER use it.

CShields Posted 10 May 2008 , 6:03pm
post #29 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by norma20

OMG! Isn't it some PLASTIC ruffle that is still around??? icon_confused.gif
If the answer is yes, Martha Stewart would NEVER use it.




Actually, there is a plastic ruffle at the base of the tuk-n-ruffle, but on top of that ruffle is a netting ruffle which is attached and often edged with an accessorizing ribbon of material color that finishes the top ruffle. The attached photo shows a tuk-n-ruffle at the base of a wedding cake's second tier, which had a plain white sheer netting over the plastic protective base, that covered any greasy marks from icing or decorations.
LL

indydebi Posted 10 May 2008 , 7:39pm
post #30 of 32

I asked this same question last summer. I did the catering and the cake was made by an older lady (yes, even older than me!) and it had the ruffle. I was so shocked to see it because I hadn't seen it in forever, that I posted the question, too. I personally haven't used it in over 20 years. I found it hard to work with and a general pain in the patooty.

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