How Many Of You Freeze Your Cakes

Decorating By missym Updated 14 Apr 2008 , 9:37pm by yh9080

missym Posted 13 Apr 2008 , 3:23pm
post #1 of 39

Ok, I'm in a pinch for time next week and have 7 cakes for a 50th wedding anniversary. So, 14 layers will have to be baked. How many of you bake and then freeze your cakes prior to decorating? I have done it for myself, but not for a friend like I am doing this one. And ideas or advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you, Missy

38 replies
kelleym Posted 13 Apr 2008 , 3:39pm
post #2 of 39

I freeze cakes all the time, and almost always for a big order like a wedding. They will freeze beautifully for several weeks with absolutely no detrimental effect on taste or texture - in fact some people swear it makes them moister.

I let them cool to room temperature on a cooling rack. Then I wrap in one layer of Glad Press'n'Seal Freezer, then one layer of aluminum foil, making sure to seal up all openings and cracks. The key to avoiding freezer burn is in the wrapping. Two layers is always sufficient for me. Good luck! thumbs_up.gif

leily Posted 13 Apr 2008 , 3:53pm
post #3 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by kelleym

I freeze cakes all the time, and almost always for a big order like a wedding. They will freeze beautifully for several weeks with absolutely no detrimental effect on taste or texture - in fact some people swear it makes them moister.

I let them cool to room temperature on a cooling rack. Then I wrap in one layer of Glad Press'n'Seal Freezer, then one layer of aluminum foil, making sure to seal up all openings and cracks. The key to avoiding freezer burn is in the wrapping. Two layers is always sufficient for me. Good luck! thumbs_up.gif




Same here - although sometimes I have to use regular plastic wrap when I run out of press'n' seal

Marci Posted 13 Apr 2008 , 4:07pm
post #4 of 39

I freeze all the time - I recommend that you wrap them while they are still warm. That way you trap in some of the moisture. Then cool on the counter or in the fridge. Then freeze. I just wrap in one layer of plastic.... but a complete layer (around all sides, top and bottom). Since it is only for a week, freezer burn should not be an issue at all.

plbennett_8 Posted 13 Apr 2008 , 4:07pm
post #5 of 39

Yep...same as above, and if they are small I put them in freezer bags... But that's just me...lol

iamlis Posted 13 Apr 2008 , 4:10pm
post #6 of 39

I freee mine and wrap them in the sams club saran wrap as I freeze all my cakes for the next weeks use. It is much easier to fit someone in in a pinch if the majority of your cakes are done. THe are really moist too I THINK! LOL! Freeze away!

tonimarie Posted 13 Apr 2008 , 4:43pm
post #7 of 39

I too am a cake freezer. I definetly think it makes them very moist! wrap in plastic wrap and hope my kids don't find them icon_mad.gif

Classycakes Posted 13 Apr 2008 , 4:45pm
post #8 of 39

I only do wedding cakes, averaging 3 to 5 per weekend from June to October. There's simply no way to make all those cakes the day before I need them. I bake my cakes from Sunday to Tuesday before the Friday or Saturday wedding so they're just frozen for 3 or 4 days. I find it makes them more moist and more stable/denser for stacking. I wrap them completely in plastic wrap, then cover them tightly in tin foil, then put them in plastic bag and tie tightly after squishing out all the air. That way when I take them out of the freezer the day before the wedding to decorate, they are as fresh as if I just baked them.

To be honest, I love the result you get from freezing them! Even if I'm making a cake for myself, I'll always make it the day before and freeze it overnight.

bcake1960 Posted 13 Apr 2008 , 4:52pm
post #9 of 39

NO QUESTION ABOUT IT... ITS THE ONLY WAY TO GO IMO. Cakes come out so moist and crumbs are fewer... If freezing more than 1 week I wrap in plastic and foil..

Sun11598 Posted 13 Apr 2008 , 4:52pm
post #10 of 39

I try to make mine enough time ahead to freeze. I find they're more moist that way - and I think it's easier to get the crumbies off and put a light layer of icing on while it's still firm. icon_wink.gif

plbennett_8 Posted 13 Apr 2008 , 5:16pm
post #11 of 39

Ok...I have a question for ya'll... Do you torte them before you freeze, or when they are defrosted?

Kitagrl Posted 13 Apr 2008 , 5:42pm
post #12 of 39

Yep! Makes them more moist! Unfortunately freezing has a "bad rap" and customers do not like to hear it, but on the rare occasion they ask me point-blank I just explain it makes them more moist and actually fresher tasting than not.

Sometimes I'll throw them in the freezer, if only for an afternoon, then toss them into the fridge for icing the next day. Easier to handle, too.

becklynn Posted 13 Apr 2008 , 6:00pm
post #13 of 39

This question could not come at a better time. I have a big order coming up and was wondering the same thing. I'm not worried about the wrapping and freezing part, its the thawing. Do you leave it wrapped and thaw on the counter? or unwrap it first? OR do you thaw in the fridge? Is there a lot of condensation on the cake?

born2bake Posted 13 Apr 2008 , 6:02pm
post #14 of 39

I always freeze mine for ease of frosting them and I too think they are more moist after they have been frozen. I bake my cake, torte it, place toothpicks in the sides of the cake to ensure I align them evenly when putting them back together. I also put wax paper between the torted slices to be able to separate them easier when they come out of the freezer. Mostly, freezing helps eliminate crumbs when frosting and doing a crumb coat.

B2B

Kitagrl Posted 13 Apr 2008 , 6:02pm
post #15 of 39

I thaw wrapped in the fridge, the condensation (if any) will be on the outside of the wrapper. And I think the cold, firm cake is easier to work with.

springlakecake Posted 13 Apr 2008 , 6:51pm
post #16 of 39

Me Me! I don't know what all the fuss is about, not freezing I mean. I guess it makes the customer feel all warm and fuzzy inside about the cake being "fresh." Understandably you probably dont want a 2 year old cake, but for a couple days, a week or even a few months, they are FINE! It will be good if you wrap them well. It sure takes the pressure off.

twinkletoe21 Posted 13 Apr 2008 , 7:05pm
post #17 of 39

uhmm i dont mean to hi-jack the post but i was just wondering, after you take the cake out of the freezer, do you let it thaw in the fridge or out in the counter? and how long should i take it out before i can start decorating?

also, i have one major concern regarding freezing the cake..
does it make the cake "wet"? i understand getting moist but OVERLY moist almost close to being wet is what im scared of. =( we ordered at this one local bakeshop here in L.A and OMG the cake was FROZEN and when it thawed, it got all WET and nasty.. so yea i was just wondering..

sorry didnt mean to hi-jack this thread! =)))

TIA!

missym Posted 13 Apr 2008 , 7:07pm
post #18 of 39

Thanks so much everyone! I appreciate all the great tips and advice. This will certainly make things a lot less hectic for me and much more enjoyable.

And, please don't worry about hi-jacking! LOL. I would love to hear the answer to your question as well.

Bonnie151 Posted 13 Apr 2008 , 7:07pm
post #19 of 39

I almost always freeze my cakes- they are so much more moist after being frozen!

teecakess Posted 13 Apr 2008 , 7:09pm
post #20 of 39

i've been freezing a few of my cakes but i find that it becomes more moist and soft if i let it thaw on the counter wrapped rather than in the fridge. i find that when i thaw them in the fridge, they harden and become REALLY firm. i understand that's because of the butter in the cake? correct me if im wrong.

cinjam Posted 13 Apr 2008 , 7:24pm
post #21 of 39

I freeze too! I make cakes the week before they are due & freeze (one layer of plastic wrap then one layer of tin foil). I take the out the night before I am going to to frost & let them defrost on the counter top.

I too think they actually taste better after freezing.

MessiET Posted 13 Apr 2008 , 7:24pm
post #22 of 39

Do chocolate cakes freeze well? I usually make the recipe in back of the Hersheys cocoa box. I am making a chocolate cake for my SIL's wedding next month. I have frozen the WASC but never have I froze the chocolate ones. Do they do OK?

minorfan Posted 13 Apr 2008 , 7:29pm
post #23 of 39

I just did MY daughters wedding in March, I had to make the 3 tiered wedding cake, the grooms cake and 13 table cakes, along with all the favors, decorations etc. The bride my daughter had knee surgery the week before the wedding and could not do anything.

I baked and froze all the layers a month in advance. I went out and bought one of those really big rolls of 36 in commercial bakers wraps and after each baking session I would cool them and then wrap tightly in two layers of the plastic wrap then put in freezer with cake boards between every two layers.

I did not tort till I defrosted them on the counter. They seem denser but this could be from being weighed down by other cakes and they are MUCH easier to do the crumb coat on. Very moist and everyone raved about all the flavors we had. Had 10 different flavors so people could go from table to table to talk and try different ones.

I also make cakes (100% donated) to a charity that grants dreams to children with lifethreatening illnesses and I match the cake to the dream and no matter how many times I tell them I need 3-4 days notice for a cake they almost always tell me the day before so I keep the freezer full of assorted sizes.

Freeze away!!! It is the best way to keep making cakes and have a life!!
Can not be creative if I am stressed for time.

butterflywings Posted 13 Apr 2008 , 7:33pm
post #24 of 39

i recently had to freeze cakes due to a time crunch the week they were due and they were fine. i wrapped in a double layer of plastic wrap. i did thaw on the counter, and while they still tasted good, they seemed a little... softer than normal. i'm making 4 cakes this thursday for a ladies tea and have been baking today. i'm going to freeze them but i think this time, i'll try thawing in the fridge.

do you think taking them out of freezer and putting them in the fridge the night before i decorate would give them enough time to thaw in the fridge?

nickymom Posted 13 Apr 2008 , 7:50pm
post #25 of 39

Only when I have to carve a cake do I freeze them first. They taste fresh & moist - never any complaints. The cakes thaws as I'm cutting, carving.

kelleym Posted 13 Apr 2008 , 8:51pm
post #26 of 39
Quote:
Quote:

do you think taking them out of freezer and putting them in the fridge the night before i decorate would give them enough time to thaw in the fridge?




I don't know if overnight would be enough time to defrost in the fridge, but if it helps any, my standard method is to take them out of the freezer the night before, and leave them on the kitchen counter fully wrapped. By morning they are always completely defrosted and ready to go!

prettycakes Posted 13 Apr 2008 , 11:42pm
post #27 of 39

I only recently started freezing my cakes. I still try for only an over night freeze and then defrost still wrapped on the counter until noon, then they are ready for the torte and crumb coat. I haven't been brave enough to try and freeze a cake for over a week yet. But, I have found that the cake has less crumbs when it is cut at the event.

mkolmar Posted 13 Apr 2008 , 11:49pm
post #28 of 39

I don't only because I kill mine with saran wrap and foil. I strangle the poor cakes to death. When they come out they look misshapen on the tops and sometimes the bottoms. No matter how careful I am, I still can't manage to not damage it somehow. I do pop them in the freezer for a short period of time when I need to torte though.

RobzC8kz Posted 14 Apr 2008 , 12:01am
post #29 of 39

Only when I'm carving 3D cakes. But to each their own really. My Mother use to bake weeks in advance and freeze her cakes (I always gave her a hard time about it!) but non of her customers every complained.

plbennett_8 Posted 14 Apr 2008 , 12:19am
post #30 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by mkolmar

I don't only because I kill mine with saran wrap and foil. I strangle the poor cakes to death. When they come out they look misshapen on the tops and sometimes the bottoms. No matter how careful I am, I still can't manage to not damage it somehow. I do pop them in the freezer for a short period of time when I need to torte though.




Have you thought of freezing them on a cookie sheet before you wrap them for storage? If it's frozen solid, you can't strangle the poor dear...chuckle... icon_lol.gif Cuts down on all that screaming as you throw them in the freezer...LOL... Sorry...just could not help myself...lol icon_rolleyes.gif

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