What Do You Do If You Have A Cake Due And You Become Ill?

Decorating By Lenore Updated 21 Oct 2007 , 2:40am by mrstoponak

Lenore Posted 20 Oct 2007 , 1:26am
post #1 of 15

I was wondering what would you do in this situation? Would a customer be upset if you delivered or they picked up a cake when you are obviously suffering with a bad case of the common cold? Do you have back up assistants? This never happened to me but I seriously do not know what one would do. Cancel and upset the customer or have them upset because you are obviously sick and they know you were breathing very near their cake?

14 replies
TexasSugar Posted 20 Oct 2007 , 1:39am
post #2 of 15

Plastic gloves and a face mask. Unless it is something very contagious like strep or such I'd do the cake, just being as careful as I could. If you are worried about them seeing you sniffling after the cake is made you can arrange for someone else to be there at pick up time.

MommaLlama Posted 20 Oct 2007 , 1:58am
post #3 of 15

I have worried about this too. I Think I would do just what TexasSugar suggested.

shortNsweet Posted 20 Oct 2007 , 2:16am
post #4 of 15

I agree....if it's the common cold, gloves and a mask will be fine. After all...can you imagine how many people that make your food in restaraunts have colds and DON'T wear gloves and a mask???!
I had this situation where I DID have strep throat, and just felt too bad to even make the cake. I had to call the customer and tell her honestly what I had, and she was SO happy that I was honest with her, and she made other arrangements for a cake. I felt terrible, but I would have felt MUCH worse if her elderly mother had gotten sick from ME making her cake! Do what your gut tells you to do, and all will be fine. Good luck, and feel BETTER SOON!

kakeladi Posted 20 Oct 2007 , 2:17am
post #5 of 15

You wear gloves and a mask and proceed.....
When you own your own business you must do it. Of course it is not going to be your best workicon_sad.gif
It is hard to be creative when you don't feel well.

yffrank Posted 20 Oct 2007 , 2:24am
post #6 of 15

I always worry about getting really sick when I have a wedding cake to do. I really don't have a back up plan....I just WORRY!! What would you do??

Lenore Posted 20 Oct 2007 , 12:58pm
post #7 of 15

Gloves and mask are a simple, very reasonable solution. Thanks for the ideas.

baergarivera Posted 20 Oct 2007 , 1:13pm
post #8 of 15

LENORE,

Plastic gloves and a face mask, ITS SAD BUT ONE'S YOU MAKE A COMMITMENT YOU MUST FULLIT IT icon_sad.gif THIS WAY YOU COULD LOSE OVER A PERIOD OF TIME SOME SERIOUS CUSTOMER, REMEMBER AT TIMES THE BEST CLIENTS ARE THE WORST CLIENT icon_redface.giftapedshut.gificon_biggrin.gif

MICHELLE

AuntieElle Posted 20 Oct 2007 , 1:20pm
post #9 of 15

Depends on who it's for! (I'm kidding) As long as you aren't hacking all over it and you keep your hands clean everything should be fine. Gloves/mask will work just for added precaution. I have had a cold while cakin' and didn't wear a mask and gloves but washed my hands twice as often as usual. Oh, the power of hand washing. Nursing school brain washed me with the hand-washing thing. That's a good thing! Get well soon!

Elle

LeeAnn Posted 20 Oct 2007 , 1:13pm
post #10 of 15

MAKE IT!

GeminiRJ Posted 20 Oct 2007 , 3:56pm
post #11 of 15

Sometimes you HAVE to cancel the order. I did this once when my husband and I came down with a nasty intestinal bug that our kids brought home from school. There were hundreds of kids out sick, and the administration finally cancelled school in order to disinfect the entire building. When I read on-line that you were contagious for a full week after infection, there was no way I was going to risk passing along that bug to anyone!

Lenore Posted 21 Oct 2007 , 2:11am
post #12 of 15

GeminiRJ, You certainly made the right decision in that case. Again, I am not in this situation currently but was only wondering what you pro bakers out there do in such a situation.

I am used to masks and gloves as I worked in research for many yrs with bacteria and viruses before becoming a SAHM. They do make these awesome gloves that are handed ( you know one only fits left, one only fits right) that fit nice and tight and do not interfere much with hand dexterity....basically surgical gloves. I wonder if I could get my hands on some of these for caking if i ever need them.....
Thanks everyone for sharing your ideas and experiences. I really appreciate it.

DoniB Posted 21 Oct 2007 , 2:29am
post #13 of 15

I"m pretty sure that Sam's Club and Walmart both sell the surgical gloves you're talking about. I think they even offer latex-free for those of us with allergies! icon_smile.gif tight-fitting gloves are a must for me, and I keep a box on hand (hah hah!) at all times, just in case. icon_razz.gif

dessertsbydebi Posted 21 Oct 2007 , 2:23am
post #14 of 15

I had 2 cakes due this weekend. Both for good friends. The problem I had was no where near a cold! I had to have surgery on Friday morning and the cakes were due Fri and sat. I could have easily said sorry I can not do it, but I did them both thursday night and got them taken care of. Personally I do not suggest this to ANYONE! And I do not think I would do that again!! But I hate to promise I will make a cake and then go back on my word! Can't get anymore cakes like that!

mrstoponak Posted 21 Oct 2007 , 2:40am
post #15 of 15

FYI - commin from a nurse...

Becareful which gloves you buy!!

I would highly suggest only buying latex free gloves, unless you know for sure for sure that no one eatting your cake has an allergy.

Also, non-latex gloves are almost always "powdered" so they slip on easier... I am not sure that powder is ok to eat, not that that much powder will get on to the cake.. but still.

There are "food grade" gloves... with no powder, like the ones the guys at Subway wear and the school lunch ladys.. try and find those.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%