candy177 Posted 23 Apr 2006 , 9:16pm
post #1 of

Okay, I don't know what is wrong with me....but I've attempted 3 fondant cakes in the last what.....month or so. My flowerpot turned out OKAY, but ended up bulging at the bottom after a few hours. That was the second.

I've been trying to duplicate a cupcake cake that I saw on Food Network by Colette Peters. Now, I realize she's been doing cakes for over 20 years and I've only got about 1/5 of that time invested, but every time I try to duplicate this cake, I fail miserably and end up so upset and in tears!

The first time, I used a crusting shortening-based BC that ummmm yeah....my cake tiers slid everywhere and when I tried to cut it, well, let's just say I got so mad I just chucked it into the trash whole.

The third cake (second attempt on the cupcake) I used an all butter BC that sets up very well...but when I tried to smooth the fondant, all of a sudden my icing started to melt, (my kitchen wasn't warm at all) and the fondant ripped (I think it was too thinly rolled out). I managed to get the cupcake "paper" done...(I rolled that fondant a little thicker) but then I still got droopiness.

I was using the easy recipe MMF (made from fluff, not melted marshmallows)...when I knead the color into my fondant, should it stick to my hands/gloves at all? Other than these fiascoes, I've made 1 fondant cake and that was with the Wilton premade fondant - which I think tastes like well....I shouldn't say here! I love the flavor of the MMF and that it's actually edible! I wouldn't be as concerned with it if I didn't have a wedding in September! I haven't set up the contract yet, but I will be doing so in the next couple of weeks (so sue me, I've never used a contract before).

Anyone know of any tutorials, anything? How thick should I be rolling the fondant? Should I be using my all butter BC?

As far as today's disaster, I had a kitchen covered in powdered sugar (is it better to roll out in powdered sugar or cornstarch?) and cake crumbs. I chucked the frosting top but my son and I managed to eat half of the tiny cupcake bottom. At least he thought it was good!

18 replies
izzybee Posted 23 Apr 2006 , 9:42pm
post #2 of

I always roll out to at least 1/8" and I only put a crumb coat of buttercream on the outside of the cake, and put extra between the layers. That way, when you press the fondant on, you don't leave indents because of the thick layer of buttercream underneath. Does that make sense?

bodaisy Posted 23 Apr 2006 , 9:51pm
post #3 of

Here's a great site that gives step by step info and pictures..
http://whatscookingamerica.net/PegW/Fondant.htm

From experience.. It sounds like you didn't let your bc harden before applying the mmf. Not sure if you did or not (that's what happened to me when I tried it the first time.) As for the stickiness I never used fluff it's ALWAYS marshmallows as the consistancy is much thicker than fluff. I always grease my hands w/crisco when kneading the mmf. It does stick sometimes, but then i just add a little bit of 10x sugar and it stops sticking.
Check out the site above as it's REALLY informative and I have it out EVERY time I make mmf.

Hope this helps
b

Mac Posted 23 Apr 2006 , 10:01pm
post #4 of

candy177--

Go to a fabric store and buy a yard of 10 gauge clear vinyl. Roll your fondant on that--it will not stick but it won't slide around either. You can use that to lift the fondant and place over your cake. Then peel it off. Fondant will be nice and smooth without patches of white from the powdered sugar or cornstarch.

I also use it to wrap fondant around the sides of the cake. My fondant does't stretch out of proportion. HTH--Pam

TamiAZ Posted 23 Apr 2006 , 10:11pm
post #5 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by candy177

Okay, I don't know what is wrong with me....but I've attempted 3 fondant cakes in the last what.....month or so. My flowerpot turned out OKAY, but ended up bulging at the bottom after a few hours. That was the second.

I've been trying to duplicate a cupcake cake that I saw on Food Network by Colette Peters. Now, I realize she's been doing cakes for over 20 years and I've only got about 1/5 of that time invested, but every time I try to duplicate this cake, I fail miserably and end up so upset and in tears!

The first time, I used a crusting shortening-based BC that ummmm yeah....my cake tiers slid everywhere and when I tried to cut it, well, let's just say I got so mad I just chucked it into the trash whole.

The third cake (second attempt on the cupcake) I used an all butter BC that sets up very well...but when I tried to smooth the fondant, all of a sudden my icing started to melt, (my kitchen wasn't warm at all) and the fondant ripped (I think it was too thinly rolled out). I managed to get the cupcake "paper" done...(I rolled that fondant a little thicker) but then I still got droopiness.

I was using the easy recipe MMF (made from fluff, not melted marshmallows)...when I knead the color into my fondant, should it stick to my hands/gloves at all? Other than these fiascoes, I've made 1 fondant cake and that was with the Wilton premade fondant - which I think tastes like well....I shouldn't say here! I love the flavor of the MMF and that it's actually edible! I wouldn't be as concerned with it if I didn't have a wedding in September! I haven't set up the contract yet, but I will be doing so in the next couple of weeks (so sue me, I've never used a contract before).

Anyone know of any tutorials, anything? How thick should I be rolling the fondant? Should I be using my all butter BC?

As far as today's disaster, I had a kitchen covered in powdered sugar (is it better to roll out in powdered sugar or cornstarch?) and cake crumbs. I chucked the frosting top but my son and I managed to eat half of the tiny cupcake bottom. At least he thought it was good!




Are these your first and only experiences with fondant??? If so, I would suggest practicing on a regular round cake a couple times to learn the basics of working with fondant and then move onto the more complicated shapes. It might save you some frustration!! I know what it's like to throw out a cake due to total frustration!!

Cake_Princess Posted 23 Apr 2006 , 11:21pm
post #6 of

I roll my fondant out on my Wilton fondant dohickythingamajig. The plastic mat. For larger cakes I use vinyl like Mac suggested. Lightly smear it with a bit of crisco to keep it from sticking while rolling it out.

As for how thick, I Was told when you can see the lettering of the Wilton Mat it's good enough.

I put my buttercream on good and thick. i find it not only creates a good foundation for the fondant but it makes the fondant a bit more palatable.

To apply the fondant, pick up the vinyl and center it over the cake and gently lower it onto the cake. Carefully peel the fondant offthe vinyl. Smooth the top down. For cakes with angles, start with the corners or angles and smooth those in place then smooth the flat surfaces. For round cakes simply start with one spot and work your way around. Trim your fondant and add the finish touches.

If you have not taken any classes on fondant it maybe a good idea to take one. This way you have someone to show you how to hands on.

Crimsicle Posted 23 Apr 2006 , 11:26pm
post #7 of

Great advice here! I'd second the suggestion to go to MMF made with marshmallows instead of the fluff.

daisysn2001 Posted 23 Apr 2006 , 11:32pm
post #8 of

I have to tell you that I took the wilton class on fondant and loved the feel and look of it. Your right though it tastes awful. So I run home and make marshmallow fondant from fluff and that was a mess! It never got stiff. I tried again with the same results. I have decided to always use marshmallows. They work so much better and I don't know why. And make sure you have 16 oz of marshmallows. Most the bags I have seen are 10 oz. Practice makes perfect try something simply to start your confidence soaring before trying your cupcake again. Good Luck!

candy177 Posted 23 Apr 2006 , 11:58pm
post #9 of

Thanks everyone! But hey, my flowerpot turned out pretty well! Aside from the bulging....I was impressed with it.

I'm addicted to this site. LOL I posted the flowerpot...but I'll post it here too. icon_razz.gif

I like the vinyl idea though - and I don't know if I added enough sugar anyway! I will purchase some marshmallows tomorrow and try again. Which would be the best recipe for BC? All butter (I doubt it), all shortening, half/half or a high ratio shortening? (Not that I know how much of each amount to use LOL) For all shortening, I usually use the Wilton Snow-White BC...I think I will practice on a few single layer rounds....and then move up to rectangles....what about using a whipped icing base?

My dh says to me, "Wow, they really are helpful there!" Of course! The best way to better ourselves is to help each other out...tips and tricks of the trade, right? icon_smile.gif
LL

Mac Posted 24 Apr 2006 , 1:46am

Hey--ya know, we all had to start somewhere. And I have yet to meet someone who made a perfect 1st cake. Gosh, I look back on some of mine when I first started and think--I wouldn't pay good money for THAT!!!

I have never met any more nicer people than here. LOL--well, I can't say I've actually met anyone but ya know what I mean!

BTW--great flowerpot.

candy177 Posted 24 Apr 2006 , 5:10am
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac

Hey--ya know, we all had to start somewhere. And I have yet to meet someone who made a perfect 1st cake. Gosh, I look back on some of mine when I first started and think--I wouldn't pay good money for THAT!!!

I have never met any more nicer people than here. LOL--well, I can't say I've actually met anyone but ya know what I mean!

BTW--great flowerpot.




I know...oh, I am now remembering the first black forest cake I ever tried to do...that was a disaster (my first stringwork....it was soooo crooked and uneven! ) - thankfully, it was for my ex husband, so he didn't care! I also made the mistake of not icing between the tiers before I slapped the cherry pie filling in...so the next day, we had dry cherries....yay! I wouldn't have paid ANY money for that! LOL

I have to agree with you though, the people here are INCREDIBLE! I just started posting on the forums last week....I'm addicted already!

Oh and BTW--thanks. icon_smile.gif

jenn-oh Posted 26 Apr 2006 , 5:27pm

After rolling the fondant on the vinyl, Do you flip the fondant and vinyl over so the fondant touching the vinyl is facing up? Is the fondant lightly stuck to the vinyl, and if so, doesn't that leave blemishes on the cake? Or does the fondant practically fall off the vinyl as you flip it? I plan on trying this myself, but want to save any possible agravation.

AmyBeth Posted 26 Apr 2006 , 5:34pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by jenn-oh

After rolling the fondant on the vinyl, Do you flip the fondant and vinyl over so the fondant touching the vinyl is facing up? Is the fondant lightly stuck to the vinyl, and if so, doesn't that leave blemishes on the cake? Or does the fondant practically fall off the vinyl as you flip it? I plan on trying this myself, but want to save any possible agravation.


If you lightly grease your mat with crisco then the fondant will stick to the mat while you flip it over, but will peel off easily on to the cake.

Mac Posted 26 Apr 2006 , 6:43pm

jenn-oh

I never put anything on my vinyl mat--no powdered sugar or crisco, and I have never had a problem. It holds to the vinyl when flipping, but once fondant is on the cake, you can peel it off easily.

JulieBugg2000 Posted 2 May 2006 , 3:29am

I'm a little late finding this post but I had to throw my 2 cents in lol. I have the exact opposite problem - I can do fondant with no worries (so far so good anyway) but can't seem to do buttercream to save my life. Even with the best case scenario I end up with half the cake in the icing as crumbs, and let's not even start to talk about getting the little bit of icing that doesn't have crumbs remotely smooth.. I swear I just can't do it! Blahhhhh.

AmyBeth Posted 2 May 2006 , 3:35am
Quote:
Originally Posted by JulieBugg2000

I'm a little late finding this post but I had to throw my 2 cents in lol. I have the exact opposite problem - I can do fondant with no worries (so far so good anyway) but can't seem to do buttercream to save my life. Even with the best case scenario I end up with half the cake in the icing as crumbs, and let's not even start to talk about getting the little bit of icing that doesn't have crumbs remotely smooth.. I swear I just can't do it! Blahhhhh.


Your buttercream might not be thin enough. It will pull up from the cake and you will get a lot of crumbs if it isn't thinned down enough.
Also, make sure that the spatula that you are icing the cake with never touches the cake. There should always be a thick layer of icing between the two.

You might have already thought of those things, but that is something that I am good at, so I had to add. icon_smile.gif

JulieBugg2000 Posted 2 May 2006 , 3:43am

The last time I tried I thought the icing may have not been thin enough.. But by the time I came to that conclusion I was tired of messing with it and gave up lol.

I haven't TOTALLY lost hope yet.. I'll give it another shot and see how it goes icon_smile.gif

lastingmoments Posted 2 May 2006 , 3:54am

I dont think it matters what you put under your fondant....galze, buttercream -all butter/half ahortening half butter/ all shortening / whipped .....who cares......Ive used all of these and havent had a problem usually when my fondant ripped its beacuse it needs more suger and is to thin so it tears easily........

I used to roll it out pretty thin but since i got the debbie brown books i noticed hers were always super thick .....and i started doing that and found that it gives me alot more to play with i can pull and smooth without worries of tearing it ....

hope this helps

candy177 Posted 2 May 2006 , 6:41pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by JulieBugg2000

I'm a little late finding this post but I had to throw my 2 cents in lol. I have the exact opposite problem - I can do fondant with no worries (so far so good anyway) but can't seem to do buttercream to save my life. Even with the best case scenario I end up with half the cake in the icing as crumbs, and let's not even start to talk about getting the little bit of icing that doesn't have crumbs remotely smooth.. I swear I just can't do it! Blahhhhh.




Crumb coat, crumb coat, crumb coat! I prefer to use a butter-based BC recipe and always crumb coat. Add more icing. Never let the spatula touch the cake! I use a plastic dough/bench scraper for smoothing and it turns out lovely! icon_smile.gif

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