That Hour Glass Look

Decorating By shelbycompany Updated 25 Sep 2007 , 5:18pm by mamacc

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shelbycompany Posted 22 Sep 2007 , 4:41am
post #1 of 11

What's the best and easiest way to carve that hour glass look out of 8" round cakes? I think it looks so cool.

Thanks! icon_biggrin.gif

10 replies
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SISA Posted 22 Sep 2007 , 4:52am
post #2 of 11

I haven't made one yet but, I am getting ready to next week. I have however read instructions for one and it said to stack 3 layers. For example a 9 inch, 8 inch and a 9 on top of that. Hope this helps.

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albumangel Posted 22 Sep 2007 , 10:02pm
post #3 of 11

I haven't done one either, but I agree that it would probably work best with 3 layers, the middle one being an inch smaller.

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DianeLM Posted 22 Sep 2007 , 11:55pm
post #4 of 11

Here's how I would do it:

Bake 3 layers the same size.

Torte each layer into two pieces. Take the 3rd layer and divide the torted pieces between the other two cakes. So, now you have 2 cakes, each 3 torted layers.

Take one of the cakes and place an 8-inch cake board on the bottom and a 6-inch cake board on the top. Elevate the cake on a can or another cake pan, smaller than 8 inches. With a serrated knife longer than the height of the cake, using the cake boards as guides, carve the cake into a tapered shape. Do the same with the other cake.

Now, put the two cakes together.

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FromScratch Posted 23 Sep 2007 , 12:05am
post #5 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by DianeLM

Here's how I would do it:

Bake 3 layers the same size.

Torte each layer into two pieces. Take the 3rd layer and divide the torted pieces between the other two cakes. So, now you have 2 cakes, each 3 torted layers.

Take one of the cakes and place an 8-inch cake board on the bottom and a 6-inch cake board on the top. Elevate the cake on a can or another cake pan, smaller than 8 inches. With a serrated knife longer than the height of the cake, using the cake boards as guides, carve the cake into a tapered shape. Do the same with the other cake.

Now, put the two cakes together.




Complete and utter ditto!! This is how I did my topsy turvy cake (well the cake boards as your guide while carving) and it works GREAT!

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ApplegumKitchen Posted 23 Sep 2007 , 12:31am
post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by DianeLM

Here's how I would do it:

Bake 3 layers the same size.

Torte each layer into two pieces. Take the 3rd layer and divide the torted pieces between the other two cakes. So, now you have 2 cakes, each 3 torted layers.

Take one of the cakes and place an 8-inch cake board on the bottom and a 6-inch cake board on the top. Elevate the cake on a can or another cake pan, smaller than 8 inches. With a serrated knife longer than the height of the cake, using the cake boards as guides, carve the cake into a tapered shape. Do the same with the other cake.

Now, put the two cakes together.




Was wondering if by 'hourglass' the same technique could be applied to this cake http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-photo_955843.html - My daughter would like me to make her wedding cake incorporating the look of the top tier - PM'd person who made the cake and left comment but no reply received. - What would you suggest to be the "best" method of covering with fondant - Am concerned that one large piece draped over the top will pleat & crease - was thinking to roll lengthwise and cover top with separate piece that would be hidden by flowers.
Any suggestions for achieving this look MOST WELCOME & APPRECIATED icon_biggrin.gif

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ApplegumKitchen Posted 25 Sep 2007 , 7:59am
post #7 of 11

BUMP - Anybody got any advice?

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mamacc Posted 25 Sep 2007 , 11:52am
post #8 of 11

Actually I think it would be easier to just cover the whole cake in one piece of fondant. It's kind of like covering a topsy turvy except it goes back out at the bottom.

Courtney

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ApplegumKitchen Posted 25 Sep 2007 , 12:03pm
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamacc

Actually I think it would be easier to just cover the whole cake in one piece of fondant. It's kind of like covering a topsy turvy except it goes back out at the bottom.

Courtney




Thanks Courtney, thumbs_up.gif

I'm going to do one as a trial and see how it goes

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DianeLM Posted 25 Sep 2007 , 1:29pm
post #10 of 11

To get the hourglass shape in the picture, I think you'd need to add a straight-sided layer between the two tapered layers.

I agree with mamacc about the fondant. Drape one piece over. IMO, the only way to make fondant with a seam around the top look nice, is to go over the seam with a crimper. I can tell you've never tried to wrap a tall piece of fondant around a cake before. icon_wink.gif icon_wink.gif icon_wink.gif

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mamacc Posted 25 Sep 2007 , 5:18pm
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by DianeLM

I can tell you've never tried to wrap a tall piece of fondant around a cake before. icon_wink.gif icon_wink.gif icon_wink.gif




LOL, yeah....it's not pretty icon_biggrin.gif It's that darn horizontal thing! Vertical is just much easier.

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