First Wedding Cake

Decorating By Lino Updated 10 Jun 2006 , 2:32pm by boonenati

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Lino Posted 2 Jun 2006 , 4:37am
post #1 of 10

Hi I am new to the site and have enjoyed reading some of your old posts. I will be attempting my first wedding cake. I was asked by my niece. Any suggestions or advice would be great. She picked a very simple design thank goodness.

9 replies
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boonenati Posted 2 Jun 2006 , 10:08am
post #2 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lino

Hi I am new to the site and have enjoyed reading some of your old posts. I will be attempting my first wedding cake. I was asked by my niece. Any suggestions or advice would be great. She picked a very simple design thank goodness.



Lino
What is the design? What type of cake are you making?
In order to receive help you will need to give a more specific question. What is it that you dont know how to do? Are you using buttercream or fondant? Will you be stacking the cake, using pillars, or a stand of some sort? Will you be making flowers, using fresh flowers etc??
cheers
Nati

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Lino Posted 4 Jun 2006 , 10:23pm
post #3 of 10

Sorry about not providing enought info.
I was hoping for some no fail cake recipes. I will be using french buttercream and making my own flowers. The cake will have pillars and be 3 layers with 2 sheet cakes on the side. She is wanting something like drissle of white over the cake to make it look lacy.
I was just wondering about the best way to transport the cake about 1/2 hour drive. I figured I would assemble it there. I plan to make a trial run cake before the big day.
thanks Lino

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Phoov Posted 5 Jun 2006 , 1:42am
post #4 of 10

I would dowel each tier and box each cake. Make sure they can sit perfectly level and not scoot around. Grippy shelf lining material really helps here. Also......with each cake boxed, you can "weave" a lightweight blanked around the boxes to stablize them. aND ALLOW PLENTY OF TIME TO TRAVEL! Take a "fix it kit" with you. Good Luck!

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skylightsky Posted 5 Jun 2006 , 2:53am
post #5 of 10

Hi, would you kindly email or post your French Buttercream recipe?

I'm trying out a whole lot of buttercream recipes and would be most appreciative.


Best Wishes on your first wedding cake. Dowel heavy and you'll be fine.

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Lino Posted 5 Jun 2006 , 4:28am
post #6 of 10

For french buttercream all you are doing is adding dry instant vanilla pudding to your buttercream recipe. It tastes great and is not as sweet as the regular buttercream. You can use it just like buttercream icing. It is a bit lighter.
Thanks for your advice on the cakes
Lino

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boonenati Posted 10 Jun 2006 , 2:12am
post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lino

For french buttercream all you are doing is adding dry instant vanilla pudding to your buttercream recipe. It tastes great and is not as sweet as the regular buttercream. You can use it just like buttercream icing. It is a bit lighter.
Thanks for your advice on the cakes
Lino



Lino
I always thought that french buttercream was made with eggs, butter and granulated sugar. How do you make yours??
Shortening??
Nati

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candy177 Posted 10 Jun 2006 , 7:01am
post #8 of 10

A true French Buttercream is made with egg whites, granulated sugar and LOTS of butter.

I will NEVER use another BC recipe again as this one is AWESOME! Okay, so I may have to use something shortening based if I know the cake cannot be kept at a cool room temp. I leave my extra BC on the counter for a couple of days in a tupperware. Anything I'm not going to use right away, I put in a tupperware in the fridge. This recipe is TO DIE FOR! I love it and Duff's bakery manager gave it to me with permission to share...so I'm sharing. icon_smile.gif

French Buttercream
Recipe courtesy Duff Goldman, Charm City Cakes, Baltimore Maryland

Ingredients:
10 egg whites
15 Oz. granulated sugar
2 1/2 pounds of room temperature butter

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 15 min
Yield: Roughly four pounds of buttercream (enough to ice a 3-tier cake)

Equipment:
5 qt. mixer w/ bowl and whip attachment
Rubber Spatula

Start whipping egg whites slowly in the mixer by themselves (no sugar or butter yet) until the whites are foamy. Make sure to have a completely clean and dry bowl when you start your process, any fat or liquid at all in the bowl will stunt the protein development of the albumen (egg white protein) and you will not have a proper meringue at the end, the results could be disastrous.
Increase the speed of the mixer and slowly start adding the sugar until all the sugar is incorporated.
Once all the sugar is in, increase the speed of the mixer even further and whip until the mixture is shiny and stiff. You now have a meringue. You know when your meringue is done when you pull out the whip, hold it horizontal, and if you have what looks a sparrows beak on the end of the whip.
Replace the whip, turn the mixer on medium and start adding the butter a bit at a time, once all the butter is incorporated, turn the mixer on high and leave it for a while. Depending on the weather, the buttercream could take anywhere from 5 to 15 minutes to form. You will know when it has formed when you hear the motor of the mixer starts to slow down and whine a little bit, also, when you first add the butter, your meringue will break down and look nasty, this is good and is what you want. When the buttercream is done, the mixture will be homogeneous and consistentand tasty.
Remove the buttercream from the bowl and place in an airtight container. Buttercream can be kept at room temperature for a few days or in the fridge for a week or two, but always use warm buttercream when icing a cake. To warm up the buttercream, put it back in the mixer using the whip or the paddle, and apply direct heat with a propane torch you can find at any hardware store.

Notes:
1.  Using a blowtorch directly on a food product is a very standard practice (see crËme brulee) and anyone who says otherwise is a jackass who knows nothing about cooking.
2.  Dont worry about using raw egg whites in your buttercream, the sugar cooks the eggwhites and makes them perfectly safe to eat, if you are still uneasy about this, use a pasteurized egg product.


Lino, good luck with the cake. icon_smile.gif Post photos! I use the grippy & super grippy shelf liners both under the boxes in the car and inside the boxes also. I also use double sided carpet tape between the cake cardboard and my foil baseboard as I had a double half sheet slide when I had to hit the brakes a little suddenly. I always hate the delivery. I drive super slow and go around every little pothole! I agree also, definitely dowel the layers and assemble on site - bring your emergency kit and give yourself lots of time.

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Lino Posted 10 Jun 2006 , 11:24am
post #9 of 10

the french buttercream I was referring to was what we use at my work place. They make this stuff in very huge amounts. I will see if I can get their recipe but I am not sure how to scale it down. Everything they use is by the pound. I do know that the french has, vanilla pudding mix, butter, shortening, lemon, salt and maybe a few more ingredients.
Thanks for your recipe will try it out.
Lino

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boonenati Posted 10 Jun 2006 , 2:32pm
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by candy177

A true French Buttercream is made with egg whites, granulated sugar and LOTS of butter.



candy
The recipe i have is made with whole eggs, beaten and then
a hot syrup added to that, then when that mix is cooled it's added to the butter. It's really delicious.
Nati

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