How to Decoupage a Cake

This stunning decoupage technique is so simple, but amazingly beautiful. Check out how Diane created the beautiful watercolor inspired tier on this cake.

What you will need:

  • Fondant Covered Cake
  • Food safe printed image of your choice (I just chose one image, but feel free to mix as many coordinating images you’d like.)
  • Piping Gel
  • Painting Brush
  • Scissors

Begin painting piping gel onto your fondant covered cake, a little goes along way. I do the entire cake at once.

Then start tearing your wafer paper sheets into random shapes and sizes. For and 8in. tier I used 3  sheets of printed wafer paper.

Begin placing torn pieces onto cake, overlapping as you go. You may need more piping gel on some the wafer paper that over lap more than others. Use a paint brush and place a little on the back of the wafer paper, feather it down with a clean brush.

Continue around the cake until completely covered or you may opt to have some fondant showing through.

Once you have completely covered the cake take a pair of scissors and trim off the top or you may opt to leave it with the jagged edges, I think it looks nice too. 

Comments (20)

on

I only heard of cake decoupage 2 days ago, and was hoping to learn more about it... Thank you so very much for your lovely tutorial. Your cake is simply amazing.

on

Where to we find this beautiful paper, in Australia we only seem to be able to get solid colors, do we need a edible printing machine??

on

Becs FF, I do have a edible printer, but it is not necessary your local cake decorating shops should be able to print some images for you. You could goggle images/ prints that you like and save them to a jump drive or directly email to your cake shop and have them print them out. Only suggestion is if your are selling your cakes be sure to get permission from the person who designed the print.

on

SweetNeddy, I have not tried this technique on modeling chocolate but it would work on ganache, but I would suggest white chocolate ganache, the darkness of the chocolate may show through the edible image and change the desired look. Do post your pictures using modeling chocolate I would love to see what you create!

on

Yes, however you would have to use some moisture such as water, vodka, piping gel or even crisco to adhere the icing sheets to the ganash or modeling chocolate.

on

Yes, however you would have to use some moisture such as water, vodka, piping gel or even crisco to adhere the icing sheets to the ganashe or modeling chocolate.

on

To avoid worrying about all the permissions, if you have an edible printer Icing Images has a product called iDesigns which gives you access to over 1600 different images that are licensed for edible use. This way you never have to worry about copywritten images and all the images are catagorized for your convenience.

on

You can, however most people end up pealing the rice paper away before eating it as it is tougher and does not taste as good as icing sheets.

on

Why your color in your wafer paper look soo brightt? My printer are new. Full of edible tint. Its a canonn.... and  the photo never  have instense color... im doing  something  wrong?

on

Hi gigcruz, I don't think you are doing anything wrong. It maybe the image that you chose to use? I chose a really vibrant watercolor and this is the way it printed out I did not do anything different to my printer, it may even be because it's a direct contrast to the black of the other two tiers. You'll notice that my other wafer paper is not as bright on my tutorial cake, the image colors were not as vibrant, but that is just the image colors themselves nothing to do with the printer.

Although I did notice that when I print on wafer paper it is even brighter sorry I wasn't much help.


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