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fondant roses??

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Good morning. Does anyone else make roses out of fondant only, rather than half gp and half fondant? Any opinions on this? Which is better? I DO want thin petals. I think they look more like real roses. But I thought I could do this by rolling the fondant thinner and by using the ball tool to thin the edges of the petals. Thanks for your input. I am actually making a "Harley Davidson" wedding cake. (Oh Lord.....give me the strength to turn this bride's idea into an elegant wedding cake icon_smile.gif )
post #2 of 14
I make all my flowers out of flowerpaste , fondant or half half just doesn't give the effect of "real" enough for me
post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 
What is that? Do you make it yourself?
post #4 of 14
I use the royal icing tylose paste. It is really easy to make yourself and the results are worth it. I make a lot of roses and wouldn't make them out of anything else.

If you would like some more info on how to make it please PM me I am happy to answer any questions.
post #5 of 14
Flower paste is called gumpaste in the United states. I use nicholas lodges- its the one where you make royal icing and add tylose powder. You can get the paste very thin and it is very pliable. Its really nice to work with. You can find the recipe all over the internet and CC icon_smile.gif
post #6 of 14
I make roses all three ways: fondant only, fondant and gum paste, and gum paste only. For roses that people can actually eat and enjoy I make fondant only and I actually have a lot of people request these.

For fondant only roses I roll well kneaded pliable fondant out to about 1/16" and use a circle cutter for the petals. I create a cone base out of a large ball of fondant leaving the cone at the top of the ball with enough fondant at the bottom to create a standing base so I can work with both hands to apply the petals. I pick up a circle, press it thinner and wider, lightly brush it with water and wrap the entire cone and ending up overlapping and lightly furling the outside edge.
Then I thin three circles on one side only until you can no longer easily feel the edge of the fondant. Next, take one at a time and lightly brush water in a V shape at the bottom half of the petal and add to the wrapped cone leaving the left side unattached. Add the next two petals in the same manner overlapping them and finally tucking the third one in under the first. Furl and curl the petals slightly. The next row will be five petals done in the same manner which will give you an open rose bud flower . For a full open flower add a third row of seven petals and furl them a bit more.

You determine how large your finished rose will be by how large you make your cone and how large the circles are that you cut to make your petals. I have made fondant roses as small as 1/4" to as large as 3". Attached is an example of the size I put on cupcakes.
LL

Creating works of art every chance I get! And yes, I am licensed, permitted, inspected and insured! Check out my website!

 

www.letmecallyousweetart.com

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Creating works of art every chance I get! And yes, I am licensed, permitted, inspected and insured! Check out my website!

 

www.letmecallyousweetart.com

Reply
post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thank you for your time...to all that responded. I appreciate you taking time out to answer my question. To "heartsnsync"...I LOVE that!! I have not been happy with Wilton's method of making roses. I like the control that your method offers. Thanks very much!
post #8 of 14
The reason people use gumpaste or flower paste to make roses is because you can work it a lot thinner than fondant, and it has enough body that you can make the petals large and also make them stand out from the rosebud. If you try that with fondant, it just flops over on itself.
post #9 of 14
I use the circle cutters also, I used the tutorial from sweetwise on youtube you can search sweet wise simple rose and it should come up. except I use the ball tool around the edges to soften them up. HTH.
post #10 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thanks. I'm using gum paste next time. I like the thin petals.
post #11 of 14

I make my roses using rolled modeling chocolate. It is more challenging because of temperature sensitivity but I can get the petals to a lifelike thinness. They also smell and taste great. 

LL

from Kristen at Wicked Goodies http://www.wickedgoodies.net <<blog, tutorials, tips, and videos on baking, cake construction, cake decorating, and modeling chocolate.  

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from Kristen at Wicked Goodies http://www.wickedgoodies.net <<blog, tutorials, tips, and videos on baking, cake construction, cake decorating, and modeling chocolate.  

Reply
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chellescakes View Post

I use the royal icing tylose paste. It is really easy to make yourself and the results are worth it. I make a lot of roses and wouldn't make them out of anything else.


If you would like some more info on how to make it please PM me I am happy to answer any questions.
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chellescakes View Post

I use the royal icing tylose paste. It is really easy to make yourself and the results are worth it. I make a lot of roses and wouldn't make them out of anything else.


If you would like some more info on how to make it please PM me I am happy to answer any questions.
So where can you but that at am new to bakibg cakes.
post #14 of 14

heartsnsync & wickedgoodies: your roses are so beautiful.

Plain fondant & modeling chocolate obviously can make great flowers in talented hands.:-)

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