Stop Hydrangea Flowers Breaking

Decorating By mcaulir Updated 31 Mar 2014 , 7:05pm by liz at sugar

mcaulir Posted 4 Feb 2014 , 9:35pm
post #1 of 15

When I make hydrangea filler flowers with gumpaste, the petals seem to break really easily when I'm placing them. So I make them, they dry, I dust them, all is well. The slightest touch, though, when placing them on the cake, or trying to wire them together seems to break the petals off at the base.

 

Any ideas on how to prevent this?

14 replies
cupcakemaker Posted 4 Feb 2014 , 10:05pm
post #2 of 15

AAre you maybe rolling it a bit thin? You also need to hold the wire and not the flower when placing.

liz at sugar Posted 4 Feb 2014 , 10:15pm
post #3 of 15

I can't remember the name of it, but isn't there something you can add to gumpaste to strengthen it?  It adds elasticity so that the flowers aren't so fragile.  Maybe someone remembers the name of it?

 

Liz

cupcakemaker Posted 4 Feb 2014 , 11:06pm
post #4 of 15

ANot that I know of. You add cmc/Tylose to fondant to make it stronger.

Sassyzan Posted 4 Feb 2014 , 11:12pm
post #5 of 15

AWhat are you using for the center of the flower? Maybe the petals are not adhered well to that?

liz at sugar Posted 4 Feb 2014 , 11:19pm
post #6 of 15

Quote:

Originally Posted by cupcakemaker 

Not that I know of. You add cmc/Tylose to fondant to make it stronger.

 

I think it starts with the letter "P".  I am racking my brain trying to remember . . .

 

Liz

mcaulir Posted 4 Feb 2014 , 11:21pm
post #7 of 15

I'm using a ball of gumpaste attached to a wire, and let dry. So it's dry when I'm attaching the flower, using tylose glue. That seems to stick properly, but the part of the flower where it's the thinnest is where it snaps.

 

I am rolling the gumpaste quite thin - but no thinner than I would roll it to make rose or peony petals - is thicker better for these kinds of flowers?

Sassyzan Posted 5 Feb 2014 , 1:05am
post #8 of 15

AHuh. I haven't had major breakage problems with hydrangeas. Maybe try thicker petals once and see if that does the trick. Sorry I'm not more help.

mcaulir Posted 5 Feb 2014 , 1:31am
post #9 of 15

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sassyzan 

Huh. I haven't had major breakage problems with hydrangeas. Maybe try thicker petals once and see if that does the trick. Sorry I'm not more help.

 

That's OK! :-D

 

I might do that next time. Maybe I need to try a different brand of gumpaste. Or not use my klutzy fingers.

cakebaby2 Posted 16 Mar 2014 , 8:09am
post #10 of 15

They are fragile thats the beauty of them. I like to glue a few overlapping onto a small piece of styrofoam (my first attempt was on a ping pong ball in frustration) then royal ice that among the other flowers.If you are using a cutter and veiner leave the gumpaste a little thicker at the back of the flower and insert a heated wire into the flower while its still not hardened....and store them wired upright and seperate from other heavier flowers till you need them. I use an upside down shoe box with stryrofoam glued to the lid like the old snow globe idea.

sugarflorist Posted 16 Mar 2014 , 11:29am
post #11 of 15

AAll sugar flowers "when made properly" are fragile. But gum paste is not the right paste to use for flowers. It dries brittle when rolled thin. I would start by changing the paste to a flower paste. If you can not get it where you are I can provide you with a recipe. Flower paste is much stronger and dries like china, breakers like china too ;(

Most flowers have drying stages that make them easier to assemble. But here are a few of my tips. Tape your wires when everything has dried. When you assemble the flower or arrangement bend the wires ti keep each element separated. Generally I tape upside down. Store your flowers, leaves and petals by pushing the stem into dry floral foam (the type used for silk and dried flower arranging) so that there is space between between each element or flower

Once you are ready to place your flowers use long tweezers (surgical type look at the shesto site) a soft paint brush or paint brush handle to arrange each petal and leaf. You will always get some breakage so I make extra. I will try to fing some links for the products I have suggested. If you have any Alan Dunn or Nicholas lodge books they will have the flower paste recipe in.

sugarflorist Posted 16 Mar 2014 , 11:46am
post #12 of 15

Ahttp://www.shesto.co.uk/p101/Strong-Fine-Stainless-Steel-Tweezers/product_info.html

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/2-X-DRY-FLORAL-FOAM-BRICKS-BLOCKS-SILK-DRY-FLOWERS-/251257304241

http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/?ie=UTF8&keywords=flower+paste&tag=googhydr-21&index=aps&hvadid=30048423766&hvpos=1t1&hvexid=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=4884748527789459260&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=e&hvdev=t&ref=pd_sl_6tty00sog8_e

Hope these help. sure you can find suppliers in your part of the world once seeing the products.

I have not made hydrangea yet as I don't have the cutters and veiners but it is on my list for my next competition. OP have suggested you roll your paste slightly thicker. If you use the right paste you will not need too. I think that thicker paste looks clumsy and detracts from the realism. For flowers you should be able to read print through the paste. It is the realism that I find so addictive so for most flowers the thinner the better.

cakebaby2 Posted 31 Mar 2014 , 12:39pm
post #13 of 15

Your work is beautiful, I saw some of them. I also use a flower paste, not homemade but a Squires Kitchen one which dries like porcelain...and as you say breaks like it too. Realism is a pain but I cant see the point if people dont try to sniff them!

I hope someday to be half as good as you, at the moment I'm a rose and stephonotis girl.

DaysCakes Posted 31 Mar 2014 , 12:46pm
post #14 of 15

Quote:

Originally Posted by liz at sugar 
 

 

I think it starts with the letter "P".  I am racking my brain trying to remember . . .

 

Liz

Do you mean Platinum paste?  I have tried this before but didn't get the best results.

liz at sugar Posted 31 Mar 2014 , 7:05pm
post #15 of 15

Quote:

Originally Posted by DaysCakes 
 

Do you mean Platinum paste?  I have tried this before but didn't get the best results.


Yes, it is Platinum paste!  Some people seem to love it - they say you can roll it paper thin, and it isn't as fragile as regular gumpaste.  I wanted to order some, but couldn't remember what it was called.  Thank you for jogging my memory!

 

Liz

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