Wilton Doll Pan Vs. Kitchen Aid Mixer!

Decorating By MELROSE315 Updated 7 Aug 2013 , 4:01pm by WickedGoodies

MELROSE315 Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 11:01pm
post #1 of 7

AHello all. I am am making my first Cinderella stand up cake. The Wilton pan looks nice.. But I have seen many posts with users using their kitchen aid bowl. Pros and cons? The doll pick does not look like Cinderella .. Should I buy a Cinderella doll? Would that be to big for Wilton pan?? I would love some input from experienced cake doll makers! So appreciative of your time and talents!

6 replies
kakeladi Posted 4 Aug 2013 , 2:33am
post #2 of 7

The only 'con' is that there is no metal rod to help conduct heat to the center of this large cake.  One could  make something similar by twisting a bit of alumimn foil into a tight 'pencile' and pushing it into the batter after the bowl has been filled w/batter.  Make sure that pencil is as long as the bowl is high.

I do believe any doll w/legs is too tall for the Wilton pan.  Usually people bake an extra round to go under the doll skirt.  I don't remember is there is the same problem w/the KA bowl.  If this is for a customer, be sure to have them buy the doll & get it to you in plenty of time to use.  Then you have to make a hole in the cake that is *just!* wide enough for the hips of the doll.  If you try to puch the doll into the cake w/o that hole it will split the cake in 2 :(

kakeladi Posted 4 Aug 2013 , 2:33am
post #3 of 7

The only 'con' is that there is no metal rod to help conduct heat to the center of this large cake.  One could  make something similar by twisting a bit of alumimn foil into a tight 'pencile' and pushing it into the batter after the bowl has been filled w/batter.  Make sure that pencil is as long as the bowl is high.

I do believe any doll w/legs is too tall for the Wilton pan.  Usually people bake an extra round to go under the doll skirt.  I don't remember is there is the same problem w/the KA bowl.  If this is for a customer, be sure to have them buy the doll & get it to you in plenty of time to use.  Then you have to make a hole in the cake that is *just!* wide enough for the hips of the doll.  If you try to puch the doll into the cake w/o that hole it will split the cake in 2 :(

howsweet Posted 4 Aug 2013 , 3:01am
post #4 of 7

If you want moist, tender delicious cake, it might be best to bake layers and carve. It's not a hard shape.  Is this the one? Looks like it comes with a rod, fwiw.

 

ajwonka Posted 4 Aug 2013 , 3:30am
post #5 of 7

If you don't already own the doll pan, I certainly wouldn't buy one.  I've found, even with a heating core, it's difficult to achieve a moist cake throughout.  I have baked graduating round cakes (stack your pans to decide which sizes to use), torted/filled as usual, frozen, and carved into a dress shape.

 

I've always used the doll picks to not have to mess with the legs!  HTH!

LeslieStew Posted 5 Aug 2013 , 3:02am
post #6 of 7

I used the doll pan for my Cinderella cake.  The dress was not big enough for the doll I was provided with without layers.  I don't think I'd buy the pan, I borrowed it from a cake lady friend.  If you have rounds that would likely be your best bet and just carve. 

WickedGoodies Posted 7 Aug 2013 , 3:48pm
post #7 of 7

I have tried both the KitchenAid bowl and the Wilton wonder mold to make doll cakes but I prefer to use a combination of an 8" round pan + an 8" bowl (I use heating cores in both). I level off the tops then sandwich them together. I find that baking the shape in two parts helps maintain moistness. The tutorial at this link shows how to bake a cake in a bowl: http://www.wickedgoodies.net/2013/08/how-to-make-a-half-sphere-cake/

 

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