How Do I Get My Fondant Tier From Showing Its Two Layers???

Decorating By Nutmeg84 Updated 28 Feb 2012 , 5:39pm by CWR41

Nutmeg84 Posted 27 Feb 2012 , 3:47pm
post #1 of 10

Hi! My name is Nutmeg! Im new to the whole Forum thing so bare with me~ lol Im also a newby to the whole cake thing....I have a new business called Confectionary Creations in an area that doesnt offer anything like it. I offer fondant and buttercream cakes of their own imagination. Everyone has just run to the corner market and gotten a sheet cake from the store bakery. I have make Mickey Mouse Clubhouse Cakes, Bottoms Up Baby Shower Cakes and even one Wedding Cake. It started as a hobby for family birthdays and occations, but has evolved into a full fledged buisiness. Anyway, the more popular my name becomes, the more I want to perfect what Im doing...to actually KNOW what Im doing! lol The questions I have been trying to get answered is.......HOW IN THE WORLD can I stack a two layer tier without the Marshmallow fondant showing that it is a two layer cake. The MMfondant shows the crease in the middle of the two layers. I have tryed putting an extra layer of buttercream...then the MMFondant, and even a thicker batch of MMF, but nothing seems to work....Is it my fondant...my buttercream...the weather!?? I hope I described my problem good enough! I need help from someone who has been doing this longer than I have and KNOWS!!! HELP Thank you to any answer or Idea...and GOD BLESS for your time!!! icon_smile.gif

9 replies
cakestars Posted 27 Feb 2012 , 4:09pm
post #2 of 10

mine used to do this as well icon_confused.gif what i do now is stack my tiers and crumb coat them the night before and let that settle. the next day (decorating day) i will put my final layer of buttercream on and then apply my mmf. hope this helps!

gbbaker Posted 27 Feb 2012 , 4:14pm
post #3 of 10

I do the same thing as cakestar, I add a "spackle coat" cake crumbs mixed with buttercream made from butter, shortening and confectionery sugar(Toby Garret's recipe) Works like a charm, makes the cake look flawless.

leah_s Posted 27 Feb 2012 , 4:19pm
post #4 of 10

You're not letting your cakes settle. Fill them, weight them and let them settle. Do not refrigerate during settling (unless you have used a perishable filling and in that case you have no choice) then, crumb coat, finish coat and decorate.

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=633571&highlight=newest+trick

waggs Posted 27 Feb 2012 , 4:28pm
post #5 of 10

I just made a cake for my father's 80th birthday. I put a book on the layers for about 4 hours, but when i put the fondant on it still bulged. Any idea why?

paulstonia Posted 27 Feb 2012 , 4:29pm
post #6 of 10

Ok, just gonna describe how I do this cause I don't how else to do it icon_biggrin.gif You put your first layer down, pipe your dam of super stiff buttercream put down your filling put your net layer on lining it up very carefully, press down on the cake, then I pipe the same stiff buttercream I used for the dam in the space between the two layers all the way around, then I crumb coat it.

graciecakes2003 Posted 27 Feb 2012 , 4:32pm
post #7 of 10

Hi Nutmeg!

I think I can help you with this. After seeing the wrinkle you are talking about over and over again, I seemed to have figured it out. Finally!! There are several things that can cause the problem. I live in the Houston, TX area where it is very humid, so naturally that can have some effect on the fondant. I think lack of support for the cake and warm (or too much) buttercream is the main cause.

Here's what I do now to avoid the wrinkle or sag...

* First your buttercream frosted cake and the cake itself has to be at room temperature. I like a crumb coat- not too thick. (If you frost cold layers, then cover in fondant, once the cake comes to room temp under the fondant, it will cause the fondant to sweat underneath and wrinkle. If you have the finished cake in a small kitchen where something is boiling on the stove, the steam will also cause the fondant to sag ) Once I know my cake is at room temp, I cover in fondant. Then, FOR NO MORE THAN 10 MINUTES, I put my covered cake in the fridge. This stiffens the fondant up enough to allow it to keep its shape, without making the fondant hard. This has been the biggest help. For some reason, even when I've delivered a cake in the TX heat, the buttercream may soften underneath, but the fondant holds its shape, and you never see the layers under it. So I never add embellishment or stack a fondant cake without doing this.

* Next, make sure your cake is on a strong enough board to support its weight. I used to think a single tier cake was fine on a regular cake circle, but fondant makes the cake heavier that a typical cake. So, when you lift the cake from the bottom of the cardboard, the cardboard slightly gives, and this causes a crease. I like the 1/2 inch cake drums, or you could tape or glue three regular cake boards together to offer more support. ( I always use a drum for a 2-tier cake)

*Then for tiered cakes, I spend a little extra time making sure the dowels I use to support the top tier are the right length. If even just one isn't slightly taller than the lower cake, it could allow the top cake to put too much weight on the lower one, and that will cause a problem every time.

I hope this helps! I haven't put many cakes on cake central yet, but they are all at graciecakessweetery.com.

Good Luck!

FromScratchSF Posted 27 Feb 2012 , 4:52pm
post #8 of 10

Agree with all of the above, but I also find the technique of how you put your fondant on can make your filling bulge - if you are pushing down on the top of your cake with your fondant smoother trying to push your fondant smooth, trying to make it stick, trying to get sharp corners, or trying to work out air bubbles, the pressure is going to make your filling bulge. Fondant smoothers should be used with a light touch to smooth the surface of your fondant, not man-handle the fondant into place. I barley use my smoothers now, I mostly use my hands to get the fondant into place, then use a smoother over the surface once or twice, then use another piece of fondant to buff out any imperfections.

Nutmeg84 Posted 28 Feb 2012 , 5:30pm
post #9 of 10

Thank you all so much for your advice! It really helped me out! The only thing I am kinda confussed over is the crumb coat...Is the crumb coat and the buttercream coat the same thing just put on at different times or are they completely different? I know that by what everyone said, I should put the crumb coat on the night before (without refrigerating) to let the cake settle..then the next night put on the last layer of buttercream...right? And also, should I always use a dam of stiff buttercream around the middle of the two layers or only when I have filling that would leak? Thank you SOOOO much for your help! I appreciate it so much! ~God Bless, ~Nutmeg84 icon_biggrin.gif

CWR41 Posted 28 Feb 2012 , 5:39pm
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nutmeg84

The only thing I am kinda confussed over is the crumb coat...Is the crumb coat and the buttercream coat the same thing just put on at different times or are they completely different?



For most, yes, it's the same (unless using the previously mentioned "cake spackle"), and some people don't do a crumb-coat layer at all.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nutmeg84

I know that by what everyone said, I should put the crumb coat on the night before (without refrigerating) to let the cake settle..then the next night put on the last layer of buttercream...right?



No... Leah answered this above.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%