Need Input On How To Do This "upside Down" Wedding

Decorating By julz417 Updated 27 Dec 2011 , 6:52pm by sillywabbitz

julz417 Posted 27 Dec 2011 , 4:06am
post #1 of 7

Hi All! I'm new to the boards, but just have to say that this site is terrific! I had a bride bring me a picture of the attached cake (sorry, don't know who to give credit to for the design) but I was wondering if anyone has done one like this before. If so, what support system/structures did you use to ensure that it didn't topple? Trying to come up with pricing and to see if this is something that I could do for her. She is having a relatively small wedding, so wouldn't need many servings....top tier could possibly be a dummy. Thanks for looking and I look forward to all your comments icon_smile.gif
LL

6 replies
KoryAK Posted 27 Dec 2011 , 4:34am
post #2 of 7

I think the cake in the picture is a dummy - see the "support structure"? Just some chocolate pegs on the corners - there's no way that's happening in real life. In a real-life situation, you will support this cake the same way as any other one (SPS system is the best) just making sure that the plate holding each upper cake isn't so large that the legs won't fit right into the smaller cake below. This means that the the plate will be SMALLER than the cake that is sitting on it, so each cake will need to be on a double-thick cardboard so that the edges can hang off and not droop or collapse. You can use round or square plates.

peg818 Posted 27 Dec 2011 , 1:56pm
post #3 of 7

There is system designed for doing upside down cakes check out cake stackers this can be done relatively easily using their system

bobwonderbuns Posted 27 Dec 2011 , 3:11pm
post #4 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by KoryAK

I think the cake in the picture is a dummy - see the "support structure"? Just some chocolate pegs on the corners - there's no way that's happening in real life. In a real-life situation, you will support this cake the same way as any other one (SPS system is the best) just making sure that the plate holding each upper cake isn't so large that the legs won't fit right into the smaller cake below. This means that the the plate will be SMALLER than the cake that is sitting on it, so each cake will need to be on a double-thick cardboard so that the edges can hang off and not droop or collapse. You can use round or square plates.




There's a company called cake stackers and they specialize in supports and videos for how-to do cakes like this. SPS won't work in this application.

julz417 Posted 27 Dec 2011 , 5:39pm
post #5 of 7

Thank you so much for the replies. I will check out the cake stackers system. It might not be cost effective for the bride to order this cake if I will have to purchase a lot of supplies specific to this one cake....maybe she'll choose something else icon_wink.gif

Thanks again!

KoryAK Posted 27 Dec 2011 , 6:44pm
post #6 of 7

I suggested the SPS because there are gaps between the layers of the original cake - It doesn't look like the cake stackers would accommodate that?

sillywabbitz Posted 27 Dec 2011 , 6:52pm
post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobwonderbuns



There's a company called cake stackers and they specialize in supports and videos for how-to do cakes like this. SPS won't work in this application.




Why wouldn't SPS work for this? The only issue would be to make sure the. Bottom plate was begin enough. You might have to do a slightly larger bottom tier but if you did an 8 inch bottom tier and a 10 inch middle, the 10 inch middle would sit on an 6 inch plate. I'd use foam core or a drum for the base of each above tier since the plate isn't full size but it should be fine. And if she's really worried small styro centers between each tier for extra support.

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