Long Nails

Decorating By grandmaruth Updated 5 Mar 2012 , 12:57am by Norasmom

knlcox Posted 11 Oct 2011 , 9:12pm
post #31 of 70

I always wondered about the cake shows as well. How can the workers decorate those cakes and have hair all over the place, hands touching their faces and then going back to touching fondant figures, hands scratching arms and then touching fondant..........yuck. I wonder why the health department doesn't watch those shows and then show up to do an inspection! I wear gloves because I work in a bakery and I never leave the table with those gloves. If I have to move around I take the gloves off inside out and leave them near the cake I'm working on. I always switch gloves if I forget to take them off. It's a huge hassle but the the rules of the bakery are for us to wear gloves, aprons, hair nets and even face masks if we think we may be getting sick.

Apti Posted 11 Oct 2011 , 9:35pm
post #32 of 70

I've only been decorating for about 2 years and cannot understand how in the world people with long fingernails can do cakes! I have very short nails, unpainted, and STILL poke holes in buttercream and fondant.

I hobby bake from my home (I don't sell anything). I find that it is much easier and more sanitary for me to wash my hands repeatedly. I've been teaching my 8 year old niece how to bake and told her about the importance of "food handler handwashing". She promptly went to the bathroom sink and washed her hands perfectly while singing Happy Birthday twice. She dried her hands (on a clean towel), turned to me with a big grin and said, "We learned handwashing in kindergarten!".

I took her with me to the store and purchased a pack of hairnets (which she'd never heard of....) and we wear them when doing cakes or candy.

If an 8 year old can do it right, so should everyone else.

CrumblesConfections Posted 11 Oct 2011 , 9:38pm
post #33 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Karen421

Yup - very short nails and no polish and I usually take my rings off too. icon_biggrin.gif




I'm glad someone mentioned rings because that's a HUGE pet peeve of mine! I cannot STAND to see people with rings on decorating cakes or cooking! Rings can hold all kinds of nastiness. I take off my wedding ring when decorating...period.

MamaDear Posted 11 Oct 2011 , 10:04pm
post #34 of 70

Short nails are definitely the way to go, sanitation is the key. I think handwashing is better than gloves because gloves tend to give people a false sense of sterility - your hands are clean because they are inside the glove but the glove that you are touching your equipment with has been contaminated with whatever you touch.

Rings and watches are almost the worst. There is a lady I have seen from Savannah Geeoorgah that wears big honking bacteria catching rings to do almost everything... all I can think about it her wearing them while she pets that lovely dog that walks around in her kitchen too. blaarrrgghh. although I love her, I just can't handle the ring thing...that was the first thing my MeeMaw taught me - take of the jewelry before you start to cook.

The worst are those sweaty competitors in almost every show I watch--- for peetes sake, two or three bobby pins and a rolled up paper towel can put a stop to that. Was watching Chopped Championship last weekend and when the dude took a towel (not a red one which is what I use cause I know the red ones immediately go into the clothes hamper after ONE use) and wiped down his whole sweat laden head I almost barfed. Where did that towel go? YUCK!!!!
(editied for spelling)

BizCoCos Posted 11 Oct 2011 , 10:41pm
post #35 of 70

Yes, on these shows the competitors drop the food and put it right back on the counter. I'm sure that for taping these shows they don't want to show ugly gloves and hairnets-I've seen Edna use gloves for caking numerouys times. But if they drop the food in the competition and they know they are being taped, can you imagine what they do in their own restaurants? Another pet peeve is tasting and retesting with utensils, why do you do this? I even rinse my utensils when I'm only cooking for myself.

cakestyles Posted 11 Oct 2011 , 11:12pm
post #36 of 70

[quote="MamaDear"]
The worst are those sweaty competitors in almost every show I watch--- for peetes sake, two or three bobby pins and a rolled up paper towel can put a stop to that. Was watching Chopped Championship last weekend and when the dude took a towel (not a red one which is what I use cause I know the red ones immediately go into the clothes hamper after ONE use) and wiped down his whole sweat laden head I almost barfed. Where did that towel go? YUCK!!!!
(editied for spelling)[/quote


I love Chopped but I would never want to be a judge who has to eat the food the contestants prepare. Most of them sweat profusely and a few times I've actually seen the sweat drops falling off their heads...probably into the food.


YUCK!!!

costumeczar Posted 12 Oct 2011 , 3:27pm
post #37 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by margiep

But if they drop the food in the competition and they know they are being taped, can you imagine what they do in their own restaurants? .




See, this is what I wonder about. If people are willing to cut corners on something so simple to deal with, what else are they cutting corners on?

Claire138 Posted 12 Oct 2011 , 3:33pm
post #38 of 70

The food shows are the worse. I can't understand all that long hair flying about with no one saying anything! In my own home when I am cooking or baking I cover my hair with a net bc I have long hair & as for watches, rings, and bracelets I never wear them in the kitchen. My watch gets in my way I find so I never wear it unless I'm out.

AnnieCahill Posted 12 Oct 2011 , 10:42pm
post #39 of 70

I dated a guy who was a chef in a five star restaurant. He said they would routinely wash food off if it fell on the floor. I looked at him with my mouth hanging open. He said well that's the way it is-they aren't going to let a prime steak go to waste when they can just wash it off and sear it at 500 degrees to kill anything.

Think about that the next time you're nomming on your $50 filet mignon!

Cricketina Posted 12 Oct 2011 , 11:02pm
post #40 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by bakencake

Quote:
Originally Posted by cakestyles

Every one of us who sell should keep our nails immaculately clean, clipped short and unpolished.

It completely grosses me out to see food handlers/preparers with long nails...it's very unsanitary.

If one must wear their nails long and polished they should wear gloves.

My HD requires it...I just assumed that was the rule everywhere. icon_confused.gificon_eek.gif



I second this




I third this ( Quote ) so many things can get stuck under long nails ..ewww
There are careers that require short nails or gloves as a sanitary precaution...cake making is definitely one of them! I went to a bakery one time in Ca and one of the sales girls was licking frosting from under her long acrylic nails right out front yucky ! I immediately left and called her manager who was not happy at all... We should keep our hands as sanitary and as clean as we can this is what our customers families or friends deserve..I'm not worried about a cake getting nicked I'm worried about what may have dried up and stuck up under the long nails ! I'm not against long nails BUT if you have them you need to glove them for safety and health reasons! I choose to keep mine clean trimmed and unpolished just as a double precaution ...interesting topic!

Cricketina Posted 12 Oct 2011 , 11:09pm
post #41 of 70

[quote="cakestyles"]

Quote:
Originally Posted by MamaDear


The worst are those sweaty competitors in almost every show I watch--- for peetes sake, two or three bobby pins and a rolled up paper towel can put a stop to that. Was watching Chopped Championship last weekend and when the dude took a towel (not a red one which is what I use cause I know the red ones immediately go into the clothes hamper after ONE use) and wiped down his whole sweat laden head I almost barfed. Where did that towel go? YUCK!!!!
(editied for spelling)[/quote


I love Chopped but I would never want to be a judge who has to eat the food the contestants prepare. Most of them sweat profusely and a few times I've actually seen the sweat drops falling off their heads...probably into the food.

I know I know......why don't they stop that sweaty issue Gross! Wear a headband or something...the judges always mention unsanitary issues..but WHY do they let the sweat Fly! So nasty! I need to stop reading these posts it's freaking me out! Wow


YUCK!!!


lilmissbakesalot Posted 12 Oct 2011 , 11:09pm
post #42 of 70

I worry less about steak dropped on the floor and seared to steamy perfection than I do about the prep cook making salads and not washing his hands on the way back from the bathroom...

tonedna Posted 12 Oct 2011 , 11:34pm
post #43 of 70

I have people ask me about this..my nails are not really that long. I have a log nail bed and a french manicure that makes them look longer than they really are.
As far as work...I might teach with no gloves, but I can't stand working cakes with no gloves. I feel
its not sanitary. So when I am doing a cake for a client, I use gloves. Is that simple.

As far as short or long..short nails can carry just as much dirt. Keeping them clean is the key..
Edna

AnnieCahill Posted 13 Oct 2011 , 12:19am
post #44 of 70
Quote:
Quote:

I worry less about steak dropped on the floor and seared to steamy perfection than I do about the prep cook making salads and not washing his hands on the way back from the bathroom...




I agree completely. I'm all about the 3 second rule! There is nothing worse than people who don't wash their hands after using the bathroom. No excuse. That's how so many viruses are spread. I am so careful when I go out in public not to touch my eyes, nose, or mouth. I mean, have you ever looked closely at the buttons on an ATM?

CalhounsCakery Posted 13 Oct 2011 , 12:50am
post #45 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonedna

I have people ask me about this..my nails are not really that long. I have a log nail bed and a french manicure that makes them look longer than they really are.
As far as work...I might teach with no gloves, but I can't stand working cakes with no gloves. I feel
its not sanitary. So when I am doing a cake for a client, I use gloves. Is that simple.

As far as short or long..short nails can carry just as much dirt. Keeping them clean is the key..
Edna




thumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gif

Vista Posted 13 Oct 2011 , 2:45am
post #46 of 70

I used to be a jeweler and I can tell you the NASTY stuff I have seen inside rings literally made me throw up!! Ever since then I do clean my ring weekly! But even still I always take it off when I am caking, but mostly because I don't want to get stuff in my ring.

Long nails are definitely a no no when preparing food for clients. My hands are always soo dried out (almost cracking and bleeding) by the time I finish a cake. But it is nothing that a pair of gloves and eucerin can't fix!!

indydebi Posted 13 Oct 2011 , 6:32pm
post #47 of 70

I must admit a little confusion when I read those who "prefer" to work with short nails. You mean you have a choice? icon_confused.gif because I'm with the ones who said "my HD requires it so I thought it was a rule for everyone."

I would have girls come into the shop to place an application. I'd look them straight in the eye and ask "are you willing to cut your nails to the nub?" A 'yes' response got them an application. No nails ... no polish ... no exceptions.

A new-hire manager at the hotel I work at was doing her training-stint in the kitchen and she said she hated washing dishes because it softened her nail polish and it peeled off too easy. I grabbed her by the wrist, held up her hand in front of her face and said, "Actually, darlin', the HD forbids ANY nail polish at all so be sure that's cleaned off before your next shift in here." (I dont' care what your title is, at that point in time you are in MY kitchen! )

One of the (many) reasons I am looking forward to graduating and getting my teaching degree (and stop working in the food industry) is so I can get my nails done again. I sure miss them! icon_cry.gif

valerieInga Posted 13 Oct 2011 , 7:15pm
post #48 of 70

I am a nurse in a Neonatal ICU. Our babies are more prone to infections and we wash our hands before and after touching each patient and once washed you can only touch the patient and his equipment. We also take off rings and watches as we wash part way up the arm, and washing is at least a 15 second scrub. Infectious diseases department say that the scrubbing is actually more important than the soap used. We are not supposed to have polish or long nails either but some still do. So although I only bake for family and friends I am still in the habit of washing alot. Good habit to get in to.

tonedna Posted 13 Oct 2011 , 7:23pm
post #49 of 70

Short Nails get dirty too...washing hands and using gloves is the best way to go

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-DrXrIydTh4M/TbvoN0oNBbI/AAAAAAAACSo/Rl-P6L9ZwKk/s1600/dirty+nails.jpg

cakestyles Posted 13 Oct 2011 , 7:41pm
post #50 of 70

I completely disagree that short nails are just as dirty as long. If that were true our HD's wouldn't require that we cut them and not wear polish.


If the nails are cut even with the nail bed with no free edge at all then there is no way in heck they harbor the same bacteria under them that long nails do.

Long nails can harbor all sorts of nasty things under them. Here's an example...

I was having a pedicure one day and this older woman was getting a manicure nearby. I heard the technician ask her if she had been eating chocolate before she came in because her nails had brown stuff caked under them. She said no, she hadn't been eating chocolate...she had diarhea all morning. I nearly vomited right there. Can you imagine?

That's a true story. It's a perfect example of just how filthy long nails can be on some people.


I'm not saying that everyone with long nails harbors germs but there is definitely more chance of having bacteria and God knows what else under those long free edges.

Gloves are fine if you change them regularly.

My HD reguires no polish and short nails...I'd be shocked to learn that it's not a requirement across the board.

As far as that picture posted...those are NOT short nails...there's a free edge. Short nails means NO free edge at all....cut as short as the nail bed.

CWR41 Posted 13 Oct 2011 , 8:39pm
post #51 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonedna

As far as short or long..short nails can carry just as much dirt.




Agree. More dirt, in many cases. If you have somewhat of a fingernail, at least you're able to use it as a tool to help keep the other fingernails clean underneath.

I have an employee who clipped his thumbnail too short at the end of last week. It got infected over the weekend, was swollen to twice the size by Monday, turned green, and the infection started to spread up to his first and middle finger. He was immediately put on an antibiotic, but it continued to get worse. He's been in the hospital with an antibiotic drip ever since Tuesday... the infection is now into the bone throughout his entire body and he's expected to have his thumb amputated this weekend. Extremely unfortunate consequence from keeping nails trimmed short.

vpJane Posted 13 Oct 2011 , 8:51pm
post #52 of 70

Extreme cases. Long nails could carry your diarrhea and short nails could get your thumbs amputated. Yikes. I wonder which one I would choose.

Thing is, the poor guy trimmed them too short, probably going through his skin. Scary, but no reason to keep nails long if you work in the food industry. The rule is still short nails and no polish. If this happened as a consequence of keeping nails trimmed, we would all be walking around with amputated thumbs.

That said, I hope he gets better and that the infection doesn't spread anymore.

Ednarooni Posted 13 Oct 2011 , 9:28pm
post #53 of 70

All good points..gloves wont do any good unless you are careful not touching other things with them as one of the above cake decorators said.. Not to mention using a dirty hand to put on a glove would actually (imo) make it null and void.lol I wash and use gloves and if my gloves touch anything that shouldn't be touching..I change them. Had an argument with a doctor once as he gave my son a shot and poked himself before giving the shot.. He told me he was more at risk than my son and I told him flat that he was around more infectious things than my child ever could be.. Point is..care needs to be taken. I don't wear jewlery when decorating and I can't imagine someone taking jewelry off and thinking by them then handling fondant it would make it sanitary..unless they washed their hands after taking the jewelry off.. I love cake boss but sometimes I look at the boards they cut and I wonder if they even wash those boards as I'm used to cleaning the board AND sticking my cake on a cake board first then applying it to a "covered" board.. They just throw the cake on or so it looks like. Those people who use the bathroom and I hear the toilet flush but not the water being turned on..there are no words. I heard someone say once that she didn't need to wash her hands because she just urinated and she didn't touch her private.. Well, you lifted the lid, you touched the handle to flush.. Seriously, people need to be more conscious of sanitation in the food world. Look at all the large companies that have to recall food because of unsanitary practices.

indydebi Posted 13 Oct 2011 , 11:50pm
post #54 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ednarooni

Not to mention using a dirty hand to put on a glove would actually (imo) make it null and void.lol


Our hotel got a "bad mark" on a recent inspection because kitchen employees were putting on gloves without washing their hands first. (It wasn't me! They didn't come during my shift! ) One of the hotel managers asked me, "Did you know you were SUPPOSE to wash your hands before putting on gloves???" I said, "Well, duh.... YEAH!" dunce.gif

Short nails ... no polish ... wash your hands before putting on gloves. All are HD rules in my states.

lilmissbakesalot Posted 14 Oct 2011 , 12:15am
post #55 of 70

SHould be common sense, but one thing I have learned is that there is nothing common about sense.

icon_wink.gif

I wash my hands before gloving up, and I wash my hands in between gloves if I touch something that is suspect.

I have no problem with short manicured nails if and only if you use gloves 100% of the time. but long nails... ones that extend over the top of your finger... no freakin' way. I don't care how many pictures of short dirty nails you can find, unless you are scrubbing those suckers with a toothbrush dipped in clorox many times a day, long nails harbor more germs.

The servsafe class I took said nails could be painted IF and only if gloves were ALWAYS worn. For me... no polish eventhough I do use gloves all the time.

SweetDelites Posted 14 Oct 2011 , 12:24am
post #56 of 70

I just finished Culinary School and we had to keep nails cut and hair covered. But in pastry shop as long as your hair was up and off the top of your coat , you didn't have to wear a hat. Nails still had to be short.

aligotmatt Posted 14 Oct 2011 , 12:25am
post #57 of 70

I'm wearing nail polish this week because I have the week off! woohoo! As soon as I delivered my last cake this past weekend I came home and painted my nails. It's just for a week though... Short nails, no polish, and I keep a nail brush at the sink to keep them scrubbed well.

cakelady2266 Posted 14 Oct 2011 , 1:02am
post #58 of 70

I've never been able to grow long nails for some reason, so no biggie about keeping them short. No polish ever. I scrub under my nails with a brush and rubbing alcohol several times a day. I think the HD may allow wedding bands. I take off my mothers ring and soak it in alcohol while I'm caking, I think of it as multitasking. And I go through a boat load of gloves every week. I'm always washing my hands, you should see them they look like they belong to an 80 year old.

milkmaid42 Posted 14 Oct 2011 , 1:14am
post #59 of 70

I have been watching this thread with interest. So many of my own pet peeves have been discussed. (And the TV shows gross me out, too!) I keep my nails cut to the quick and wash so often that my hands are wrinkled, (not due to age, but that's another story). If everyone had to take some of the bacteriology classes I had in college, there would be no question. Seeing what can grow on a petri plate even with freshly scrubbed hands, can be a real eye-opener.
A stiff nail brush and full soap dispenser have a permanent spot by my sink.

Jan

tonedna Posted 15 Oct 2011 , 12:03am
post #60 of 70

Let's face it, the problem is not the nails is how careless some people are
about sanitation.
Edna

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