Lost My Flower Nail, What Can I Use Instead?

Baking By weidertm24 Updated 30 May 2011 , 5:02pm by warchild

weidertm24 Posted 28 May 2011 , 3:42am
post #1 of 14

Well turns out I can't find my flower nail and I have to make a few 10" cakes tomorrow. What can I use instead? I also don't have a heating core.

Any suggestions?

Thanks in advance.

13 replies
Sangriacupcake Posted 28 May 2011 , 4:11am
post #2 of 14

I would take a nail--something with a fairly large, flat head--and glue a sturdy piece of cardboard to it.

CWR41 Posted 28 May 2011 , 4:44am
post #3 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sangriacupcake

I would take a nail--something with a fairly large, flat head--and glue a sturdy piece of cardboard to it.




You can't use glue and cardboard in cake batter as a heating core.
(it isn't being used for making roses.)

bisbqueenb Posted 28 May 2011 , 6:16pm
post #4 of 14

A very large nail with a cleaned can lid for the base. Pound the nail thru the can lid and use the same as the flower nail. You could also make a multi layered square of tin foil and poke the thru the center. Have done both and works just fine. I bought a few 'new nails' at the hardware store...the biggest I could find, cleaned them off well with steal wool and keep them in a small box with the can lids.

Sangriacupcake Posted 28 May 2011 , 6:38pm
post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by CWR41

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sangriacupcake

I would take a nail--something with a fairly large, flat head--and glue a sturdy piece of cardboard to it.



You can't use glue and cardboard in cake batter as a heating core.
(it isn't being used for making roses.)




icon_redface.gif Sorry. That's what I get for trying to read quickly when I'm tired. icon_redface.gif

TinkerCakes Posted 28 May 2011 , 6:46pm
post #6 of 14

I have to bake a couple 10's as well....I tried using a flower nail before and it didn't work!!!! I don't have a heating core...I'm hoping someone will post and help us both!!

Sangriacupcake Posted 28 May 2011 , 6:54pm
post #7 of 14

I would personally skip the nail and bake the cake at 325 degrees. It works great for me!

But if you'd like, you could always make home-made "bake-even strips" with strips of wet towel (cut from an old one) which you pin to the outside of the pan, then cover with strips of foil.

grandmomof1 Posted 28 May 2011 , 7:23pm
post #8 of 14

When I took a cake decorating course years ago the teacher told us we could use green bean cans. I did for a while until I purchased a baking core and extra flower nails. It actually works better than the core that I had.

weidertm24 Posted 30 May 2011 , 1:59am
post #9 of 14

Thanks so much for the tips everyone! Used the towel for one of them and nothing for the second one. Both turned out pretty good!

Thanks again!

CAKELADIE1 Posted 30 May 2011 , 2:17am
post #10 of 14

I tried the flower nail once and did not have good results, so I glued strips of towels on with silicone glue. Can heat up to 400 degrees. Works awesome. My cakes come out level all the time and I bake at 325 always, like Sangriacupcake suggests.

carmijok Posted 30 May 2011 , 2:31am
post #11 of 14

Actually I've used cleaned aluminum cans (both ends open) as a core before. I actually like it better sometimes on the larger size pans as they are taller than the flower nails and provide a larger heating surface.

warchild Posted 30 May 2011 , 3:00am
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by bisbqueenb

A very large nail with a cleaned can lid for the base. Pound the nail thru the can lid and use the same as the flower nail. You could also make a multi layered square of tin foil and poke the thru the center. Have done both and works just fine. I bought a few 'new nails' at the hardware store...the biggest I could find, cleaned them off well with steal wool and keep them in a small box with the can lids.




Not trying to interfer, but nails are not food safe. Nails are treated with zinc to help prevent rusting. They are also put through a tumbling machine with caustic soda, to remove/burn off any remaining wire residue before packaging.

Nails may come a bit cleaner with a good scrub of steel wool but I doubt the steel wool would remove all the chemicals.
My opinion only, but I'd be very hesitant in recommending nails as a substitute for flower nails as well as be very hesitant in using them myself.

bisbqueenb Posted 30 May 2011 , 1:58pm
post #13 of 14

Guess I should have noted that I use Stainless Steel nails, which will be a bit more expensive, rather than galvanized nails.

warchild Posted 30 May 2011 , 5:02pm
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by bisbqueenb

Guess I should have noted that I use Stainless Steel nails, which will be a bit more expensive, rather than galvanized nails.




There's still the problem of the nails not being food safe, and not made in a food safe enviroment. Stainless steel nails are manufactured in China as well as the US and Canada for our hardware/home improvement stores. If a person ends up buying the wrong stainless nails, there is no guarantee the nails from China are true stainless steel.

It would be better to recommend food safe nails such as potato baking nails. They look the same as your everyday nail, and they are food safe.

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