PeggyMichel Posted 5 Jan 2011 , 3:27pm
post #1 of

I struggle with getting perfectly straight sides on my cake tiers. I always torte each layer, so the tier is 4 layers of cake and 3 of filling. I always have to cut and trim each tier before crumbcoating to ensure that my frosted sides will be perfectly straight. But on the cake shows, they never seem to have to do that. Does anyone else struggle as I do?

29 replies
KHalstead Posted 5 Jan 2011 , 3:33pm
post #2 of

2 words for ya


BENCH SCRAPER!

PeggyMichel Posted 5 Jan 2011 , 3:43pm
post #3 of

I DO use a bench scraper, but if the cake itself is not straight, even that is not enough to help.

indydebi Posted 5 Jan 2011 , 3:49pm
post #4 of

I'm not sure how the sides can't be straight if they were straight before you torted them?

Are you re-stacking them in EXACTLY the same position as before they were cut. Look at the cake as a clock. It's now torted. When you re-stack them, do you place the 12 o'clock position of layer 2, back onto layer one with the two 12 o'clock positions lined up with each other? If you're just slapping them back together willy-nilly, they may not line up well with the original cut.

If you're talking about a bulging problem, which can cause the sides of the cake to 'push out', are you using an icing dam to hold the filling in? Are you placing that dam slightly inside the edge of the cake and not on the exact edge of the cake. By placing it slightly inside the edge of the cake, when you assemble all the tiers, you're giving some "squishing" room for the filling/dam to move outward without bulging out over the edge.

Apply enough icing to MAKE the sides level. Don't make the mistake of (a) not using enough icing or (b) icing to the shape of the cake. (Took me years to learn that lesson!)

artscallion Posted 5 Jan 2011 , 3:49pm
post #5 of

What kind of pans are you using? Some cake pans have slightly slanted sides so that the pans can be stacked inside each other on the shelf.

Another thought...are you possibly overcooking your cakes? Overcooking can lead to the cake shrinking. When it shrinks, the top & bottom edges shrink more than the center of the side, causing a kind of bowed side.

CWR41 Posted 5 Jan 2011 , 4:02pm
post #6 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Apply enough icing to MAKE the sides level. Don't make the mistake of (a) not using enough icing or (b) icing to the shape of the cake. (Took me years to learn that lesson!)




Exactly! thumbs_up.gif

When scraping off the excess icing, if you get a thin spot, simply add more icing and smooth again.

sarahmpetasan Posted 26 Mar 2011 , 6:03am
post #7 of

Wow! It's like you all pin pointed items that I didn't notice were causing me frosting issues! Thanks for your help!
Any suggestions as to how I can avoid all the bubbles in the frosting? I know the more you mess with it, the worse the bubbles get, but how are people able to frost cakes with zero imperfections? Even grocery stores frost cakes perfectly in house and they don't usually have access to big frosting machinery.
Any help would be appreciated!
Thanks,
Sarah

CWR41 Posted 26 Mar 2011 , 6:37am
post #8 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by sarahmpetasan

Any suggestions as to how I can avoid all the bubbles in the frosting?

Even grocery stores frost cakes perfectly in house and they don't usually have access to big frosting machinery.




Are you making a batch that is large enough to cover the paddle completely to the top? If not, you are incorporating air.

The grocery stores are most likely mixing full batches with the beater blades covered, or ordering in premade buckets from wholesalers which is normally perfectly smooth. It helps if you are using icing that's smooth to begin with--not airy at all.

sweetaudrey Posted 26 Mar 2011 , 6:50am
post #9 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by sarahmpetasan

Wow! It's like you all pin pointed items that I didn't notice were causing me frosting issues! Thanks for your help!
Any suggestions as to how I can avoid all the bubbles in the frosting? I know the more you mess with it, the worse the bubbles get, but how are people able to frost cakes with zero imperfections? Even grocery stores frost cakes perfectly in house and they don't usually have access to big frosting machinery.
Any help would be appreciated!
Thanks,
Sarah




Give me a sterile needle-pin and I'll go bubble popping crazzy!

ninatat Posted 30 Nov 2012 , 12:26am

good info thank you, do they make maching's for that,

remnant3333 Posted 30 Nov 2012 , 1:05am

You will learn from your mistakes!!  Everyone here has some very good advice and the more experience you have with doing cakes the easier it will get for you. Hang in there because sooner or later you will get it!!!!  I probably made every mistake that could have been made and I am learning especially from all the people on this site!!! They are terrific and I am thankful for their help!!!
 

BakingIrene Posted 30 Nov 2012 , 1:06am
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeggyMichel 

I struggle with getting perfectly straight sides on my cake tiers. I always torte each layer, so the tier is 4 layers of cake and 3 of filling. I always have to cut and trim each tier before crumbcoating to ensure that my frosted sides will be perfectly straight. But on the cake shows, they never seem to have to do that. Does anyone else struggle as I do?

Cake shows--fuggedaboudit.  They have shown "bakers" sticking their fingers into large batches of icing and licking them...and then going back for more.  They couldn't even dollop their mix onto a plate...

 

Chill your cake layers before slicing.  Then chill your stacked tier until the filling hardens up before trying to crumb coat.  Your layers might be sliding sideways over the filling.  Maybe too much filling, or too soft filling, or kitchen too warm, or some other reason.

 

I don't have to do anything else.

swagurl Posted 5 Dec 2012 , 11:07pm

craftsy.com has a free buttercream class and the instructor filled in sooo many holes i was missing in my knowledge on how to do this...the class is in sections so you can easily skip over the first lesson on how to make the buttercream. it was a huge ah ha for me on how to get this very thing to look right!

 

Tiffany

AZCouture Posted 5 Dec 2012 , 11:41pm

I can ice a square tier perfectly round, and I can take a round cake and make it square. It has nothing to do with how straight your layers are. You ice to the shape of the cake board. That ensures perfectly straight sides. Trimming, leveling...lol. Never.

kazita Posted 6 Dec 2012 , 12:08am

AWww.designmeacake.com. she has s video on how to frost a cake and get it smooth and looking nice

mfruchey Posted 6 Dec 2012 , 1:49am

Re: bubbles, SMBC! I will never use AMBC for icing cakes ever again. Then again, I am also a recent ganache-under-fondant convert.

remnant3333 Posted 6 Dec 2012 , 2:28am

I love Design me a cake website. She has some really good cake recipes on there as well.

Annabakescakes Posted 6 Dec 2012 , 7:58pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZCouture 

I can ice a square tier perfectly round, and I can take a round cake and make it square. It has nothing to do with how straight your layers are. You ice to the shape of the cake board. That ensures perfectly straight sides. Trimming, leveling...lol. Never.

I'd like to see  that ;-)

AZCouture Posted 7 Dec 2012 , 4:37pm

Anyone can if you think about it for a second. Doesn't matter what the cake is shaped like, it's the board you put it on that determines that. ;)

lanana Posted 7 Dec 2012 , 10:26pm

A1: good cake board 2:bench scraper 3:good all butter buttercream (forget about nasty crisco buttercream) 4: upside down technique It works perfectly. !!!

AZCouture Posted 8 Dec 2012 , 6:02pm

Yep-upside down technique is awesome too.

Sara22 Posted 8 Dec 2012 , 6:40pm

What is the "upside down technique"? I'm new and have never heard of it before.

kazita Posted 8 Dec 2012 , 6:50pm

Ajessicakesblog.blogspot.com/2011/06/video-tutorial-upside-down-frosting.html?m=1 hopefully that link works sorry if it doesn't

kazita Posted 8 Dec 2012 , 7:34pm

AIf you go to the top of this page and on the right hand side in the sears bar type in Jeff_Arnett when you hit search it will bring you to another page go to the left side and find tutorials click on that and there is a step by step tutorial on how to do the upside down cake frosting. I've never done it but some people swear by it

Sara22 Posted 8 Dec 2012 , 7:36pm

The video on the site didn't work but I did some reading in some older posts and get the idea. Thanks for the reply :)

kazita Posted 8 Dec 2012 , 7:41pm

AOn the Jeff Arnett site I don't believe it's a video just pictures and step by step instructions.....ending cake looks really smooth

kazita Posted 8 Dec 2012 , 7:50pm

Acakecentral.com/tutorial/perfectly-smooth-buttercream-icing hopefully this works it's a step by step how to get a smooth cake it's how I do my cakes

kazita Posted 8 Dec 2012 , 8:01pm

AI noticed in that last step by step tutorial she doesn't mention to let your bottercream to crust up before using the viva paper towel you really need to let it crust up for a few minutes before going onto the cake with the paper towel if you don't let it crust you will just be pulling away the icing ..... do you have a good crusting recipe I have a good one that uses all high ratio shortening and heavy whipping cream it's very yummy let me know if you want the recipe

Pearl645 Posted 9 Dec 2012 , 12:17am
Quote:
Originally Posted by swagurl 

craftsy.com has a free buttercream class and the instructor filled in sooo many holes i was missing in my knowledge on how to do this...the class is in sections so you can easily skip over the first lesson on how to make the buttercream. it was a huge ah ha for me on how to get this very thing to look right!

 

Tiffany


This ^^. Follow the guide of your cake cardboard circle or square. I use an L-shaped metal ruler from a hardware. It allows the cake to get even sides.

Pearl645 Posted 9 Dec 2012 , 12:18am
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZCouture 

I can ice a square tier perfectly round, and I can take a round cake and make it square. It has nothing to do with how straight your layers are. You ice to the shape of the cake board. That ensures perfectly straight sides. Trimming, leveling...lol. Never.

This ^^. Follow the guide of your cake cardboard circle or square. I use an L-shaped metal ruler from a hardware. It allows the cake to get even sides.

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