I Donated; Now What?

Decorating By adventuregal Updated 15 Dec 2010 , 2:40am by adventuregal

adventuregal Posted 30 Nov 2010 , 2:01am
post #1 of 36

I donated an 8 double layer cake to a charity auction and someone bought it for their 9 year old daughters bday (princess theme). My consultation with them is this week and I'm wondering a couple things:
If she wants a tiara do I charge extra for it or just include it in the donation?
If she wants any fondant figures do I charge, or like above, just include it?
On the donation card sheet it just said 8 inch double layer from me.
Any thoughts?

35 replies
neelycharmed Posted 30 Nov 2010 , 2:17am
post #2 of 36

Did you put a dollar amount on the cake at the auction?
I just donated to an annual Cancer dinner and I made sure to put a $$$ amount (and a expiry date)

playingwithsugar Posted 30 Nov 2010 , 2:29am
post #3 of 36

I would think it would be understood that all they're going to get for the prize is a basic cake - top & bottom border, a few flowers or some other buttercream decoration, and a message.

Of course, these days, everyone wants something for nothing. So when you have your consultation, advise them as to what they get for the prize, and tell them that custom decorations are optional and a la carte.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

Crazboutcakes Posted 30 Nov 2010 , 2:38am
post #4 of 36

[I would think it would be understood that all they're going to get for the prize is a basic cake) Theresa

I would also think that this is what was expected. In the consultation I would let them know what you will provide for that cake and if they wanted anything else teirra, fondant figure etc than that would be an extra expense. As long as you stick to what you put on your card than all should go accordingly.

adventuregal Posted 30 Nov 2010 , 7:07am
post #5 of 36

I put in the dollar for a basic cake thumbs_up.gif The thing is, is that this client seems...a little like trouble to me. You know the feeling...that a client will be a pain in the butt?

Thats how I feel right now so I'm trying to get my ducks in a row first. I've already had to reschedule a bunch and say no to the samples she wanted (because its only an 8 inch). Then she wants to bring people and have me bring a bunch of pictures (which I don't have-of the particular theme she wants).

Yowza. I'm not looking to put on a show for her for an 8 inch round. At this point I'm planning on going with a few ideas/colors in mind and thats about it. I offered her a cupcake option if she needs more servings but thats as far as I'm thinking.

JanH Posted 30 Nov 2010 , 7:37am
post #6 of 36

The donation of a basic decorated cake was a very generous contribution on your part! Please don't allow this potentially PITA winner to railroad you into anything else. (She knew in advance that she was bidding on a basic 8" decorated cake, didn't she?)

Gently advise the winning client that "tastings" are not offered for a 24 servings birthday cake order.... So no groupies or free samples or other outrageous demands.

I'd let her pick color/s and choice of basic flavors/fillings. And then you advise her what the decorating options are - and are NOT available to her in a basic cake.

IMHO, you aren't obligated to allow her to "upgrade." And I would be hesitant do so, especially if my gut was telling me this was a no win situation...

HTH

neelycharmed Posted 30 Nov 2010 , 10:59am
post #7 of 36

I wouldn't go overboard with it, like a person already said-some people want something for nothing and this might be one of the those times... thumbsdown.gif
So stand your ground and if she wants extras, she's going to pay for the extras. ( I know easier said then done, lol)
Hope it all works out.
Jodi icon_smile.gif

cakesbycathy Posted 30 Nov 2010 , 12:45pm
post #8 of 36

Sounds like you need to be very, very clear with this woman what exactly she will be getting for her certificate.

Call or email her in advance of your meeting so there is no misunderstanding later and make sure you write everything down and have her sign it.

playingwithsugar Posted 30 Nov 2010 , 4:38pm
post #9 of 36

Please pardon me, but did you offer the consultation, or did she request it? I see no practicality in holding a consultation for an 8 inch cake, and certainly no samples.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

adventuregal Posted 30 Nov 2010 , 7:12pm
post #10 of 36

playingwithsugar-
thats exactly what I thought!!! The only reason I agreed to a consult is because she wants her 9 year old daughter to make the final decision on the cake. Which I'm assuming means I draw up some sketches of basic designs and she picks. Either way it does seem quite the fiasco for an 8 inch, but I didn't know how to say no to a 9 year old wanting to take part (I'm a sucker for kids). icon_rolleyes.gif

sweetheart6710 Posted 30 Nov 2010 , 7:28pm
post #11 of 36

I agree. When you talk to her (either an email before, or the actual consultation) just give her the 'included options'. Have a list of flavors/fillings you are willing to do, make sure she knows its just buttercream (or whatever you want to agree to), and list border/writing options as well. Say, 'ok, here is what you can choose from' (of course in a nicer way then that). If she mentions wanting more, just say 'this donation covered these options, anything extra is $$$'. But if you are having a feeling she is going to be a PITA, be ready to put your foot down. Maybe even bring a price list of 'upgrades'. I don't think she will be too much offended. Haven't we all gotten a 'free 30 min massage', and the salon hopes we will pay a small fee to upgrade to the 1 hour? I see it all the time. Hopefully she has too haha Good luck!

artscallion Posted 30 Nov 2010 , 7:33pm
post #12 of 36

I would simply tell her that, "...unfortunately, cakes that size do not include tastings or samples. Please let me know the color theme of your event, a choice from the following flavors and the date and time you will be picking the cake up."

Then decorate a nice cake for her, of your own design, that will make her happy. After all, just because you aren't getting paid for it doesn't mean she's trying to get something for nothing. She did bid and pay the charity for it. But you are only obligated to fulfill what you agreed to donate. But be aware that, unless it was a silent auction, the auctionair may have done a hard selling job and given the bidder expectations that are bigger than what you offered to donate.

If she indicates this is the case, you can decide if you want to give her what she was led to expect, inform the charity of what happened and decide if you want to donate to them again in the future. Or just tell her that, despite what the auctioneer sold, that's not what you agreed to donate...and let her complain to the charity.

adventuregal Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 6:15am
post #13 of 36

oi...so I had the consultation this evening. I know you all are going to want to kick my push over behind, but I totally caved to something entirely different. The woman and her little girl show up, the little girl (9) is screaming and crying saying she wants a doll cake. Her mom is begging me to do a barbie doll cake (the kind where the barbie is standing and the dress is the cake). I say yes...because I can't say no. And I've never done one of these before :/ Meanwhile my boyfriend is angry because I can never say no...I need cake balls.

Texas_Rose Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 6:33am
post #14 of 36

The doll cake isn't difficult, and the pan is useful for other things (a hill for an over-the-hill cake, or a shark's head). If you use a real barbie, which the mother has to provide, wrap the lower parts in plastic wrap before you stick her in the cake, and if the cake is very dense, cut out a barbie-leg shaped hole, or the cake will crack when you shove her in there (yes, experience talking icon_biggrin.gif). You have to use a round under the cake to accomodate Barbie's legs, so you'll be using more cake than the 8" two-layer you agreed on.

The reason she brought her kid with her is so that you wouldn't be able to say no. There are moms who use their kids like that. At 9, a kid would certainly have the self-control not to scream and cry in public...I have an 8 year old and a 5 year old and neither of them would dream of doing something like that. I'm sure that mom planned it to get the most out of you...but don't feel too bad. We have to say yes a few times to the wrong things, before we get the backbone to say no. I don't think men have that problem, but almost all the women I've known don't get good at saying no until they're in their 30's at least. Think about it...how many times were you told to smile as a kid? We're taught to be sweet and agreeable and helpful to everyone, and at some point we have to unlearn it, because we can't support every moocher we encounter.

NanaSandy Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 6:45am
post #15 of 36

I have done the Barbie cake, and it is a pretty simple cake to do. I did mine in butter cream for my grand daughters 3rd birthday, and it turned out very pretty. She LOVED it. If you want to absorb the cost, instead of having her provide a Barbie, you can buy the doll pick to go in the cake. That way you don't have the extra cake on the bottom. I think the pick is less than $4 at Hobby Lobby.

Crazboutcakes Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 3:45pm
post #16 of 36

need cake balls.

I so agree... this will be a lesson learned for all of us... and if and when I decide to to that I will specify on the certificate what will be offered w simple flowere and boarders etc... Thanks for teaching a valiable lesson icon_wink.gif

Crazboutcakes Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 3:45pm
post #17 of 36

need cake balls.

I so agree... this will be a lesson learned for all of us... and if and when I decide to to that I will specify on the certificate what will be offered w simple flowere and boarders etc... Thanks for teaching a valiable lesson icon_wink.gif

NatalieC923 Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 4:14pm
post #18 of 36

If a kid came in screaming, I would have given her the 8" round with border a few pink swirls. Now if she was well-behaved and sweet, then I would have given her whatever she wanted -- probably way more than I should. I have a hard time saying no to sweet kids, but brats you can keep. Ask my kids (who would never make it out of the house if they were screaming) what is the one thing I hate the most, and they will both tell you...in unison...WHINING!

But the barbie cake is really not hard at all, so you'll be fine. I would make it with the pick doll - maybe not as fashionable, but definitely cheaper. And once she's all dressed, she looks fine.

sari66 Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 4:23pm
post #19 of 36

She totally suckered you with the kid... a screaming 9 yo? Really? icon_sad.gif Well at least the barbie cake is an easy one. I'd get a pick instead of the whole doll so you're not making her more than what she deserves.
Good luck

Sunshine0063 Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 5:03pm
post #20 of 36

I agree, your lucky she wanted the barbie doll cake. I made one before I started learning how to decorate cake ( I'm still learning ) but she was the best and prettiest cake I've done ( unfortunately I don't have any pics ) very easy also.

denetteb Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 7:59pm
post #21 of 36

I have only done one Barbie cake for my niece but I used one box mix (so the same amount of batter as the 8 inch you agreed to). I made two 6 inch rounds and one layer in a glass mixing bowl that had a 6 inch diameter. The one mix worked well. So it ended up being 6 inch diameter and 3 layers high. I bought a cheapo fake barbie for a buck at Dollar Tree (which would be cheaper than a pick at Michaels). Then did the decorating.

Tclanton Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 9:25pm
post #22 of 36

I recently did a benefit cake and my client was really easy to work with - thank goodness. I know your fear - cause you really dont know going into it. My only concern is that I havent heard a word from her. I asked that she send me her thoughts on Facebook - and almost a week later - nothing. I guess I worry too much, but if something was wrong I would like to know about it.

Mama always said, no news is good news, but I still worry!!! icon_sad.gif

adventuregal Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 9:55pm
post #23 of 36

Tclanton-I totally know what you're talking about!
Thanks for all the doll-cake advice everyone! You've all made me feel alot better about it. She supplied the doll (part of the reason the little girl was crying was because she didn't know if she wanted to give me her doll). LOL. Do you think it would be better to buy the specific pan or to do a few 6's and then carve the shape down? I was thinking if I carved it then I could (possibly) still use filling. Is that a crazy thought? icon_biggrin.gif

jenmat Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 10:23pm
post #24 of 36

When I do my doll cakes, I bake a 4,6 and 8 and then carve it. But you could do whatever pans you have. Although a 6" may be a little small for the bottom of a dress. Just make sure to make it tall enough- those barbie chicks have really tall legs!
That little 9 yo was either tired or really bratty. You did what you could and hopefully you can make the cake and leave the drama behind.
Remember next time when you make a certificate to include the FINE PRINT. What does it cover? What DOESN'T it cover? Does it include delivery? Can it be used for upgrades? All these things will help you not need cake balls, since the client will be able to read the rules before even calling you.
Can you tell I've learned this the hard way?

mona1949 Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 10:32pm
post #25 of 36

At the age of nine that girl should not be behaving like that. Can you imagine what she will be like when she is grown if she is allowed to continue to behave like this? Good luck with the cake.

Navyempress Posted 2 Dec 2010 , 11:35pm
post #26 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by mona1949

At the age of nine that girl should not be behaving like that. Can you imagine what she will be like when she is grown if she is allowed to continue to behave like this? Good luck with the cake.




Possibly a "bridezilla" in the making.. I hope the OP doesn't get a call from her in 10 years wanting a wedding cake!

Erin3085 Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 1:26am
post #27 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas_Rose

At 9, a kid would certainly have the self-control not to scream and cry in public....




Oh my dear God in heaven. This is exactly what I thought. Kick your push-over rear is right! icon_wink.gif Then again, I have no patience for brats or the spineless parents that create them. Luckily for you, doll cakes are pretty simple so you didn't really cave into a demand for much more than you had already agreed to. Stay strong! icon_lol.gif

FullHouse Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 2:29pm
post #28 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas_Rose

The doll cake isn't difficult, and the pan is useful for other things (a hill for an over-the-hill cake, or a shark's head). If you use a real barbie, which the mother has to provide, wrap the lower parts in plastic wrap before you stick her in the cake, and if the cake is very dense, cut out a barbie-leg shaped hole, or the cake will crack when you shove her in there (yes, experience talking icon_biggrin.gif). You have to use a round under the cake to accomodate Barbie's legs, so you'll be using more cake than the 8" two-layer you agreed on.

The reason she brought her kid with her is so that you wouldn't be able to say no. There are moms who use their kids like that. At 9, a kid would certainly have the self-control not to scream and cry in public...I have an 8 year old and a 5 year old and neither of them would dream of doing something like that. I'm sure that mom planned it to get the most out of you...but don't feel too bad. We have to say yes a few times to the wrong things, before we get the backbone to say no. I don't think men have that problem, but almost all the women I've known don't get good at saying no until they're in their 30's at least. Think about it...how many times were you told to smile as a kid? We're taught to be sweet and agreeable and helpful to everyone, and at some point we have to unlearn it, because we can't support every moocher we encounter.




I am definitely one of those who has had to learn the hard way to have a backbone. At 35, I still don't find it easy, but I just remind myself that it is not fair to my family for me to take more of my time from them to give someone else something just because they want it. My family deserves my time more. I can also say that none of my kids (well maybe my 14 month old) would cry to a stranger because they wanted something more, not even my 3 year old, certainly not my 8 year old or my 11 year old. By school age they absolutely know better.

Doll cake is simple at least. I use the wonder mold pan and wouldn't torte or fill it and I DEFINITELY would not carve anything. Carving takes way too much time for a cake that she is already getting a free upgrade on. The pan isn't that expensive, especially if you go online and print up a craft store coupon - AC Moore usually has 40%-50% printable coupons and most stores will take each others coupons. Good luck & have fun, doll cakes are fun to make.

4realLaLa Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 2:58pm
post #29 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by artscallion

I would simply tell her that, "...unfortunately, cakes that size do not include tastings or samples. Please let me know the color theme of your event, a choice from the following flavors and the date and time you will be picking the cake up."

Then decorate a nice cake for her, of your own design, that will make her happy. After all, just because you aren't getting paid for it doesn't mean she's trying to get something for nothing. She did bid and pay the charity for it. But you are only obligated to fulfill what you agreed to donate. But be aware that, unless it was a silent auction, the auctionair may have done a hard selling job and given the bidder expectations that are bigger than what you offered to donate.

If she indicates this is the case, you can decide if you want to give her what she was led to expect, inform the charity of what happened and decide if you want to donate to them again in the future. Or just tell her that, despite what the auctioneer sold, that's not what you agreed to donate...and let her complain to the charity.





Now that's great advice! You never know what she was "sold" on.

4realLaLa Posted 3 Dec 2010 , 3:02pm
post #30 of 36

The barbie cake will be easy. I've done a few and it was a breeze. You'll do great!

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%