Local Cake Business Scammed

Decorating By cathyscakes Updated 30 Oct 2010 , 9:56pm by indydebi

cathyscakes Posted 29 Oct 2010 , 9:28pm
post #1 of 21

I just saw on my local news that a cake bakery in Oregon was scammed by the Canadian cake scam that we have all read about on cake central. She used her credit cards and is out the money, and left with several cakes. She was sitting with all the boxed up cakes, left high and dry. Too bad she wasn't on cc, she would have known it was a scam right away.

20 replies
BlakesCakes Posted 29 Oct 2010 , 9:59pm
post #2 of 21

I really do feel badly for this individual, but in all honesty...................

This whole thing is such an obvious scam, I don't understand how anyone could get caught up in it and to go so far as to complete the $ transactions, make the cakes, etc. icon_eek.gif

Old adages are born out of common sense and this is a simple case of "If it sounds too good to be true, then it probably ISN'T (true)".

I hope others learn from her mistake and that the next time, the hope a $$ windfall doesn't lead to more clouded judgement.

JMHO
Rae

cathyscakes Posted 29 Oct 2010 , 10:34pm
post #3 of 21

I think its that extra $100.00 that gets them, added on for their trouble. I'm amazed she was fooled too. My daughter works for a bank, she see's this all of the time. Its really surprising, but people are trusting, its always short notice, hearing impared people, so there is a language problem, she said she really learned her lesson with this one.
My son was looking for an apartment in Portland, he sends me a picture of this gorgeous apartment on craigslist, in downtown Portland, renting for 700.00. He sent me the ad and asked me what I thought. I knew right away it was a scam. The lady was out of the country, the spelling was weird, she rambled on and on. Saying what she did for a living, why she was renting, it was strange. An apartment that nice would have rented for 2800. 00 a month. They keep the rent low like that so some inexperience kid will call. So glad he asked me first. Its terrible that we always have to be on guard against things like this.

BlakesCakes Posted 29 Oct 2010 , 10:54pm
post #4 of 21

Oh, I hear you!

Here in Cleveland, a guy "sold" a house to seven different families. He took the deposit money from all 7 and disappeared..............AND HE DIDN'T EVEN OWN THE HOUSE! He was renting it from someone else who lived in another state. The whole thing was discovered when 2 families tried to move in on the same day and the police were called to resolve the dispute!

We all have to be fully responsible for EVERY transaction we get into. You have to research everything--especially when it involves $ or something that has to be done quickly. If you miss out on something legit because you were being careful, well, so be it--another opportunity will come along!

The best advice is "better to be safe than sorry" and "take everything with a grain of salt"!

Rae

BlakesCakes Posted 30 Oct 2010 , 12:01am
post #6 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by KarmaCakes10

You would have to be a blithering idiot to fall for that.




Wow.......so much for saying something in a compassionate and understanding way............

I guess it's always better to add insult to injury, huh? icon_confused.gif

Rub salt in any open wounds lately? icon_cool.gif


Rae

weirkd Posted 30 Oct 2010 , 12:39am
post #7 of 21

Sometimes they word it where it sounds like it could be really be true. And if I hadnt seen the posts before, I might of acted on it more. And a friend of mine got the same email and wondered if she should do it also. So just because others know right off its a scam, doesnt mean that others do.
And the funny thing is that the woman's name came up on my Facebook as an actual person. So you never know.

JaeRodriguez Posted 30 Oct 2010 , 1:50am
post #8 of 21

I have just stopped looking for houses on Craigslist! It's so full of scammers that it just isn't even worth looking anymore!

And I watch a reality show on MTV "Teen Mom" and this girl fell for the same scam but with selling her car. Sheesh.

CutiePieCakes-Ontario Posted 30 Oct 2010 , 3:19am
post #9 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathyscakes

I just saw on my local news that a cake bakery in Oregon was scammed by the Canadian cake scam that we have all read about on cake central. She used her credit cards and is out the money, and left with several cakes. She was sitting with all the boxed up cakes, left high and dry. Too bad she wasn't on cc, she would have known it was a scam right away.




CANADIAN cake scam? I've never actually seen a country tagged to any of these, but as a Canadian, I can say that if these were originating from here, the law could do something about it. Most of these originate overseas, where they can't be touched by our (American and Canadian) laws. The poor language, bad communication skills, use of a TDD system (so you can't actually hear their accents) all screams overseas non-English speaking origins to me.

As another poster said ... If it's too good to be true, it probably is. Sometimes we see with dollars signs instead of our eyes and brain. Too bad she had to learn the hard way.

cathyscakes Posted 30 Oct 2010 , 4:39pm
post #10 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by CutiePieCakes-Ontario

Quote:
Originally Posted by cathyscakes

I just saw on my local news that a cake bakery in Oregon was scammed by the Canadian cake scam that we have all read about on cake central. She used her credit cards and is out the money, and left with several cakes. She was sitting with all the boxed up cakes, left high and dry. Too bad she wasn't on cc, she would have known it was a scam right away.



CANADIAN cake scam? I've never actually seen a country tagged to any of these, but as a Canadian, I can say that if these were originating from here, the law could do something about it. Most of these originate overseas, where they can't be touched by our (American and Canadian) laws. The poor language, bad communication skills, use of a TDD system (so you can't actually hear their accents) all screams overseas non-English speaking origins to me
As another poster said ... If it's too good to be true, it probably is. Sometimes we see with dollars signs instead of our eyes and brain. Too bad she had to learn the hard way.


I'm sorry my wording was wrong. I didn't mean it originated in Canada, they just always want the cake delivered to Canada. I know its orgin is overseas.

BlakesCakes Posted 30 Oct 2010 , 5:58pm
post #11 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by KarmaCakes10

Oh please, I've witnessed some really sharp rude replies from you since I've been here. .




Really?

Well, feel free NOT to imitate my incredible rudeness anymore......... icon_lol.gif

Rae

CutiePieCakes-Ontario Posted 30 Oct 2010 , 6:37pm
post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathyscakes

Quote:
Originally Posted by CutiePieCakes-Ontario

Quote:
Originally Posted by cathyscakes

I just saw on my local news that a cake bakery in Oregon was scammed by the Canadian cake scam that we have all read about on cake central. She used her credit cards and is out the money, and left with several cakes. She was sitting with all the boxed up cakes, left high and dry. Too bad she wasn't on cc, she would have known it was a scam right away.



CANADIAN cake scam? I've never actually seen a country tagged to any of these, but as a Canadian, I can say that if these were originating from here, the law could do something about it. Most of these originate overseas, where they can't be touched by our (American and Canadian) laws. The poor language, bad communication skills, use of a TDD system (so you can't actually hear their accents) all screams overseas non-English speaking origins to me
As another poster said ... If it's too good to be true, it probably is. Sometimes we see with dollars signs instead of our eyes and brain. Too bad she had to learn the hard way.

I'm sorry my wording was wrong. I didn't mean it originated in Canada, they just always want the cake delivered to Canada. I know its orgin is overseas.





Thanks for clearing that up. After all, we're known as nice all over the world - gotta keep that image up!! icon_wink.gif

cabecakes Posted 30 Oct 2010 , 7:12pm
post #13 of 21

I don't think everyone is as prepared to be suspicious as others are. If you live in a bigger city, you are used to being suspicious of people. But I think when you live in a small town where everyone knows everyone, that suspicion isn't there as much. This may make you an easier target...not a fool. Just saying.

crazyladybaker Posted 30 Oct 2010 , 7:36pm
post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

Oh, I hear you!

Here in Cleveland, a guy "sold" a house to seven different families. He took the deposit money from all 7 and disappeared..............AND HE DIDN'T EVEN OWN THE HOUSE! He was renting it from someone else who lived in another state. The whole thing was discovered when 2 families tried to move in on the same day and the police were called to resolve the dispute!

We all have to be fully responsible for EVERY transaction we get into. You have to research everything--especially when it involves $ or something that has to be done quickly. If you miss out on something legit because you were being careful, well, so be it--another opportunity will come along!

The best advice is "better to be safe than sorry" and "take everything with a grain of salt"!

Rae



Wow...I have never heard of something like that happening. How awful!

SharonK1973 Posted 30 Oct 2010 , 8:24pm
post #15 of 21

I drive by that shop almost daily. I don't think they were clueless or anything like that. In their case, the scammer paid with a real and valid credit card! There was none of that " I'll send you a big check and you send me my change stuff" The scammer just used a stolen card/ID to pay $1200 for the cakes then at the last minute claimed there to be a problem with shipping and so she was left with all that cake. I can't understand too good yet what the scammer got out of this. I have to read the article again when I am not sitting in a seminar!

SharonK1973 Posted 30 Oct 2010 , 8:34pm
post #16 of 21

Ok... So they used someone else's credit card to pay for this cake, then came up with the shipping problem at the last minute and then asked the bakery owner to wire some money to another "international shipping company". The urgency of it all definitely impaired her judgement and she reacted the way a trusting, decent person would in an emergency. These scammers were willing to steal actually $2,000.00 from someone's credit card to pay for the cakes so they could get the shipping money they would ask her to wire!!! Spineless, daring and brazen!

eXtremecakes Posted 30 Oct 2010 , 8:36pm
post #17 of 21

I have had several phone calls and emails from some scammers in the past few weeks. They contacted us through wedding wire and said they wanted us to send a cake to canada for 300. Then they said they were hearing impaired. They wanted us to pay for a private delivery service and they would pay us back. I knew right from the bat it was off, because the cake pic they sent was butt ugly, they wanted all chocolate, and they said they had tasted my cakes which I knew probably was a crock of x@$#%!@. I looked the ladies name up on line and it was all over the internet the exact same scam. So I promptly went to Norton and emptied my quarantine file into an email and sent them a not so nice letter and some presents. Then the phone calls started through some carrier supposedly from a hearing impaired person for 300 to be shipped to Maryland, I told the operator I want ed the person's name and all info that was available and that this was a scam. She wouldn't give me anything so I asked her name she wouldn't give me that either, so I knew she was part of the scam and she got a huge piece of my ass! It's sad that they are targeting little businesses usually we are struggling to make it and jump at a cake order. They take advantage of this desperation. Never ever ever pay for any advance junk. If they ask for money it's a scam beware!

weirkd Posted 30 Oct 2010 , 8:52pm
post #18 of 21

Wedding wire is suppose of deleted her/their account. Ofcourse they will make up another name to di it with. But if it wasnt for the key words of "happy marriage", etc. I know of a lot of last minute cakes that were ligit. But the fact that they want it picked up is another clue. But again, if your in a small town, a small business its easy to fall scam to some of these people. Like I said, the womans name came up on facebook and Ive had last minute orders for things. I did one order for a four tiered cake in less than a weeks notice. The guy who was throwing the engagement party didnt think it was a big deal to order it in advance because he never did it before. So Im sure when you come across people like this sometimes its hard to determine if its a scam or not. Most people want to give others the benefit of the doubt and dont want to risk losing a potential customer by instantly dismissing them.

dkltll Posted 30 Oct 2010 , 9:10pm
post #19 of 21

I work in a furniture store by day & this almost happened to us. The hearing impaired relay service called for a customer & the customer wanted a dining set to be shipped to an elderly aunt. They gave us CC info & shipping address but said the shipping company only took cash or wire transfers. They gave us the info to send the extra $400 to the shipping company. Once we researched a little we discovered the shipper was in Africa & we are in Florida! We called the police, CC company & Attorney General & reported it. A few months later we got a similar phone call & when I requested name, address, phone #, etc for the customer prior to going forward they hung up.

If you are not on your toes it sounds legit & not everyone is internet saavy & has heard of these scams. We just keep getting the word out!

indydebi Posted 30 Oct 2010 , 9:52pm
post #20 of 21

Just as a reminder, here's one that came to my 16 year old daughter 2 years ago .... SHE WAS 16!!!!!!!!

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-621929-daughter.html+scam

I mentioned this one to a banker friend of mine in one of my networking groups and she said she sees these checks frequently .... and her bank refuses to even cash them because they KNOW they are fake.

indydebi Posted 30 Oct 2010 , 9:56pm
post #21 of 21

Just as a reminder, here's one that came to my 16 year old daughter 2 years ago .... SHE WAS 16!!!!!!!!

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-621929-daughter.html+scam

I mentioned this one to a banker friend of mine in one of my networking groups and she said she sees these checks frequently .... and her bank refuses to even cash them because they KNOW they are fake.

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