Don't Want To Go The Distance Of Delivery..turn Down Order?

Business By 1234me Updated 17 Oct 2010 , 9:18pm by 1234me

1234me Posted 16 Oct 2010 , 11:47pm
post #1 of 15

It is for a wedding cake. The distance to the venue would be 90 minutes. To some of you, this is not far. But in the suburban area I am in, it is far. There are a million other people she could use between here and there. That would be 90 minutes there, 90 minutes back, and the set up time. I don't care if I charged her $200 or even $300 delivery, I don't want to spend 3 hours and more going to her location. Do I tell her the truth? I don't want to overprice the cake because I don't want word to get around that I am overpriced. But I don't want to sound rude either because I don't want to go that distance. Is it rude if I tell her the truth?

14 replies
sweetooth0510 Posted 16 Oct 2010 , 11:54pm
post #2 of 15

I dont' know that I would come out and say that her venue is too far way, it is obviously her choice of venue so you don't want to be raining on her parade. Either say you are booked so unable to accomodate her or else explain that her venue falls out of your designated delivery zone (putting the emphasis on you not her). If you do the latter be prepared though that she could say 'but I'll pay you whatever to do it ...'

At the end of the day if you don't want to deliver that far dont' take the order icon_smile.gif

cakesbycathy Posted 17 Oct 2010 , 12:10am
post #3 of 15

If you really don't want to deliver that far then just turn down the order. For me, I would just charge a boat load of money and then if she wants to pay it you are being compensated for your time.

blissfulbaker Posted 17 Oct 2010 , 12:22am
post #4 of 15

I agree with cakesbycathy, I would charge a lot for delivery.

artscallion Posted 17 Oct 2010 , 12:23am
post #5 of 15

Gotta disagree here, sweetooth.

Don't let it be a personal thing. This is business. Businesses have policies that are consistent and impersonal. They have standard a delivery area that you are willing to take business in or not. Just tell her the venue is outside of your delivery area. The end. It's not rude or personal. It's the way professional businesses operate. It has nothing to do with her parade.

And don't lie and say you're booked because that just avoids the issue, it doesn't resolve it. What happens if she calls you for a cake in six months at the same venue? You have to lie about being booked again? Why put yourself and her through that silliness and stress? Just tell the truth and move on.

kimbordeaux Posted 17 Oct 2010 , 12:27am
post #6 of 15

If you really don't want to do it you should have told her that you only deliver within a 50 mile radius (or whatever your preference is). You really couldn't pull this one off now because she would know now that it is just an excuse. If this were true you would have told her that in the beginning. But, you can use this "excuse" in the future.

~Kim

jason_kraft Posted 17 Oct 2010 , 12:30am
post #7 of 15

I would go ahead and charge $300 for delivery. If the customer accepts, you will be making roughly $80/hour once you factor out actual expenses.

Of course, you should explain that this order is outside your normal delivery area, but as a one-time gesture you are willing to deliver the order to the venue (for an extra out-of-area surcharge).

Ruth0209 Posted 17 Oct 2010 , 3:00am
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by artscallion

Gotta disagree here, sweetooth.

Don't let it be a personal thing. This is business. Businesses have policies that are consistent and impersonal. They have standard a delivery area that you are willing to take business in or not. Just tell her the venue is outside of your delivery area. The end. It's not rude or personal. It's the way professional businesses operate. It has nothing to do with her parade.

And don't lie and say you're booked because that just avoids the issue, it doesn't resolve it. What happens if she calls you for a cake in six months at the same venue? You have to lie about being booked again? Why put yourself and her through that silliness and stress? Just tell the truth and move on.




THANK YOU! This really isn't hard. All you have to say is that you're sorry but it's outside of your delivery area. Period.

I don't understand why any business person would consider this some kind of a personal issue. And I agree that it's unethical, unnecessary and disrespectful to lie to customers. I see that advice so often on this site that it makes me want to tear my hair out. People pi$$ and moan all the time about corporations lying to customers and yet so many people here are more than happy to do that if they can't figure out how to respond in a professional way to a customer. Sorry, that's just a BIG pet peeve of mine.

sweetooth0510 Posted 17 Oct 2010 , 5:57am
post #9 of 15

The OP doesn't want to deliver the cake that far - it's stated in her post. How she decides to let the client know that she is unavailable is up to her, hence the two-fold advice.

I don't advocate lying (if someone asks if I use nut products im not going to lie to get the business). Sometimes it is easier to give people an answer that draws a line in the sand i.e. I am unavailable or booked that day - end of story nowhere the client can go from there. If you don't have in your original contract about your delivery distances and then bring that up later it leaves the door open for people to try to bargain or question you.

People ask for advice so that they can see what is suggested and then go with what suits the situation and themselves the best.

leah_s Posted 17 Oct 2010 , 6:41am
post #10 of 15

I've turned down two cakes fairly recently because they were out of my delivery area. ::shrugs:: no big deal.

costumeczar Posted 17 Oct 2010 , 1:28pm
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth0209

Quote:
Originally Posted by artscallion

Gotta disagree here, sweetooth.

Don't let it be a personal thing. This is business. Businesses have policies that are consistent and impersonal. They have standard a delivery area that you are willing to take business in or not. Just tell her the venue is outside of your delivery area. The end. It's not rude or personal. It's the way professional businesses operate. It has nothing to do with her parade.

And don't lie and say you're booked because that just avoids the issue, it doesn't resolve it. What happens if she calls you for a cake in six months at the same venue? You have to lie about being booked again? Why put yourself and her through that silliness and stress? Just tell the truth and move on.




THANK YOU! This really isn't hard. All you have to say is that you're sorry but it's outside of your delivery area. Period.

I don't understand why any business person would consider this some kind of a personal issue. And I agree that it's unethical, unnecessary and disrespectful to lie to customers. I see that advice so often on this site that it makes me want to tear my hair out. People pi$$ and moan all the time about corporations lying to customers and yet so many people here are more than happy to do that if they can't figure out how to respond in a professional way to a customer. Sorry, that's just a BIG pet peeve of mine.




So true. I probably answer about five emails a week with "I don't deliver to your location, sorry I can't help you." No big deal, and no reason to make up excuses for it.

indydebi Posted 17 Oct 2010 , 4:58pm
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth0209

And I agree that it's unethical, unnecessary and disrespectful to lie to customers. I see that advice so often on this site that it makes me want to tear my hair out.


I agree. There is no reason to lie and it makes me nuts everytime I see it also. There are too many wedding myths out there now ("tell them its for a wedding and the price doubles") giving vendors reputations as being lying unscruptulous vultures just waiting to rip off a bride.

Stop perpetuating the myth. Dont' lie to them.

This is business. It's not personal. We dont' have to worry about hurting someone's feeeeeeeelinnnnnnnngs.

If someone wants to order an apple pie from me, I jsut tell them "I dont' make apple pies." If someone wants me to deliver to Louisville, KY, I tell them, "I dont' deliver that far." (and then give them leah's phone number! icon_wink.gif )

kansaslaura Posted 17 Oct 2010 , 5:32pm
post #13 of 15

It literally makes my toes curl up inside my shoes and my hand form a fist when I get lied to. I don't see the big deal here. (as said before) You have a radius you're willing to deliver to. PERIOD. MOVE ON.

There was a thread a while back asking if any of us ever say no to naughty cakes. Yup, I do. Then there was this big discussion about how to turn it down. What should I say.. should I say I'm busy... blah blah blah.. Nope--I just say no, I don't do genital cakes....PERIOD.

When a question like this is rasied my first thought is what would you want to be told? The truth or some cobbled together less than truthful explaination. I can see right through things like this at restaurants, or where ever.. JUST tell it like it is.... Nothing will ruin your reputation faster.

Another bonus to telling the truth about this or any matter is you never have to keep track of your story.

leah_s Posted 17 Oct 2010 , 6:15pm
post #14 of 15

LOL kansaslaura. "I don't do body parts" is my standard line.

1234me Posted 17 Oct 2010 , 9:18pm
post #15 of 15

Thank you for your words of advice. I am going to tell her I do not deliver to that area. Another reason I don't want to do it is because they are having both a groom's cake and a bride's cake. She only wants me to do the bride's - the grooms is already taken care of. I had a wedding this summer where I did the bride's cake and the grandmother did the groom's and I was worried the entire time people thought her cake was my cake. I did not taste the groom's so it may have been delicous but I did not like it one bit icon_smile.gif

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