Can You Help Me Analyze This Pic?

Decorating By confectionsofahousewife Updated 21 Jun 2010 , 2:06am by confectionsofahousewife

confectionsofahousewife Posted 2 Jun 2010 , 12:57pm
post #1 of 32

A bride sent me this pic from a magazine as one she likes for her wedding cake. I think the bottom tier is a double barrel yes? Looks to me like the cakes are fondant covered but are the stripes and scrolls (is that what you would call that?) hand painted, stenciled, what? I can't tell. On the bottom tier, how would you do the top part in black fondant and the bottom white fondant? Any insight would be appreciated! Thanks.
LL

31 replies
DianeLM Posted 2 Jun 2010 , 1:03pm
post #2 of 32

Yes, the bottom tier does look like a double. Like the middle tier in my avatar. icon_smile.gif

The bottom design is called Damask. Here's how I would do it:

Cover the tier with black fondant.
Print a damask pattern onto edible image.
Attach edible image to thinly rolled white fondant.
Wrap fondant around bottom tier.

Transfer sheets with patterns on them are available. I know Global Sugar Art has them. They may have a damask pattern transfer sheet.

tesso Posted 2 Jun 2010 , 1:04pm
post #3 of 32

the scrolls and stripes look stenciled on. As for the fondant, put white fondant on, then cut out a round template from the black and place on top with sides hanging over. The hard part about that is making sure the sides of the black fondant are even.

edited to add: From looking at the pic, it looks like the stencil is done first.

confectionsofahousewife Posted 2 Jun 2010 , 1:22pm
post #4 of 32

Thanks for your quick replies!

Would you call that damask? I found this damask edible imagine at GSA but it doesn't really look like the pattern on the cake.
http://www.globalsugarart.com/product.php?id=23225&name=Damask%20Black%20Designer%20Prints%20Edible%20Image

Do you think I could pipe it? Or would it look weird?
As far as wrapping fondant around bottom tier, how do you do it without stretching the image? And what do you do about the seam?

Also, I don't imagine the bride will want to pay for a double barrel bottom tier. Do you think the design would look okay on a regular 4-5 inch tall bottom tier?

newmansmom2004 Posted 2 Jun 2010 , 1:36pm
post #5 of 32

If you pull up that magazine on Global Sugar Art, you can enlarge it and get a better view of the cake. It looks like the bottom tier was hand piped, maybe in royal icing. Then the black band around the top looks like it was done the way Tesso described...a round piece of black fondant was laid over the top of the tier, then trimmed evenly around the sides.

Good luck!

lizabu Posted 2 Jun 2010 , 1:38pm
post #6 of 32

I think this design would be pretty even on a regular sized cake. I agree with much of what was said above. Cover the cake with white fondant. At that point stencil the damask image on
http://www.globalsugarart.com/product.php?id=22785&name=Damask%20Cake%20Five%20Tier%20Stencil%20Set%20by%20Designer%20Stencils
and then add the circle of black on top. I would suggest temporarily wrapping a ribbon around so when you place the black on top you have a guide to place it exactly straight. You can take the ribbon off after. Even a strip of parchment paper would work as a guide.

tesso Posted 2 Jun 2010 , 1:47pm
post #7 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by confectionsofahousewife

Thanks for your quick replies!

As far as wrapping fondant around bottom tier, how do you do it without stretching the image? And what do you do about the seam?

Also, I don't imagine the bride will want to pay for a double barrel bottom tier. Do you think the design would look okay on a regular 4-5 inch tall bottom tier?




I was wondering the same thing. Personally I would destroy the image/fondant trying to put it on. I hope DianeLM found a way to do it.. so she can PLEASE let us know how to achieve it, without smudgeing, ripping, or fondant sagging because that is what I would get if I attempted it. icon_lol.gif I know my weaknesses. icon_lol.gif

I think it would look fine on a six inch tall cake. you would have to make the design itself smaller for a shorter cake. Size comparetively. or the design would overwhelm the cake.

VNatividad Posted 2 Jun 2010 , 1:54pm
post #8 of 32

Damask were fabrics that were weaved in different patterns. Damask isn't necessarily one print but the style. It looks like this will be a print you will need to search. Google damask stencils there are tons of prints, another suggestion would be to get a copy of the magazine. They should have a description of their cover cake and hopefully who made it. That should give enough info to research and hopefully find the design. Good luck.

confectionsofahousewife Posted 2 Jun 2010 , 7:33pm
post #9 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by tesso


I was wondering the same thing. Personally I would destroy the image/fondant trying to put it on. I hope DianeLM found a way to do it.. so she can PLEASE let us know how to achieve it, without smudgeing, ripping, or fondant sagging because that is what I would get if I attempted it. icon_lol.gif I know my weaknesses. icon_lol.gif

I think it would look fine on a six inch tall cake. you would have to make the design itself smaller for a shorter cake. Size comparetively. or the design would overwhelm the cake.




Exactly! I always stretch the fondant no matter how hard I try not to.
I have googled damask stencile and still really don't see a pattern that I feel looks like the one on the cake. Has anyone seen one like it anywhere?
I am going to try and get the magazine. Its Modern Wedding Cakes and Chocolates. Can I get that at a book store like Borders or Barnes and Noble or do I need to go to a wedding store? I have three kids and would rather make just one trip if possible!

KHalstead Posted 2 Jun 2010 , 8:10pm
post #10 of 32
confectionsofahousewife Posted 2 Jun 2010 , 8:40pm
post #11 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by KHalstead

https://secure.lucks.com/bpcsom/nxcsc.nsf/ItemInformation?openagent&SID=98D40463817DD40988257736006E9F62&Item=45063&


wonder if you could get away with this edible image for the stripes?




Ahh! I saw that one and wondered the same thing. Its was the only black and white stripes that I saw. I would rather not hand paint them. Even with a stencil I'm not sure I would do a good enough job so it would look clean. I don't think the bride would mind if the stripes were just black fondant strips. I'm more worried about the damask on the bottom tier. I wish I had some extra icing right now, I would go practice.

Cakechick123 Posted 3 Jun 2010 , 4:40am
post #12 of 32

I did this cake using an edible image (well 4 of them icon_smile.gif ) I covered the cake with fondant, then applied a tiny amount of piping gel and stuck the edible images on. the seams are on the corners, TG it blended in perfectly

http://www.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1319310

confectionsofahousewife Posted 5 Jun 2010 , 11:47pm
post #13 of 32

Eureka! I was at Joann today and found a piece of scrapbook paper that has a pattern that is very similar to the pattern on the bottom tier of the cake. Pic is attached. Not as good as a stencil or transfer sheet but at least it will give me something to look at while piping the design. I have a couple more questions regarding this cake if anyone can help.

1. I told the bride that I would be hand piping (in buttercream) the design on the bottom tier of the cake. I failed to point out, however, that black buttercream will turn the guests teeth black. Do you think I should point that out? I really don't have any other way to do the design at this point as i don't have a scrolly cutter thingy that I could use instead of piping.

2. The bottom tier is going to be an 8 inch cake stacked atop an 8 inch dummy. How do I go about doweling that? Does the dummy need dowels? Do I just dowel the 8 inch real cake to set the 6 inch one on top?
What about icing the dummy and the real cake? Shall I crumb coat them separately and then stack them together and put a final coat on? I'm not sure what the best way to go about icing a double barrel, one of which is a dummy.

Thanks for any advice!!
LL

JCE62108 Posted 6 Jun 2010 , 12:10am
post #14 of 32

Um, eww. Black teeth. I dont know about telling her now. lol. I usually mention that first thing. If you mention that to her make sure you figure out an alternate way to do the design. Personally, I love the edible image idea. If it were me, Id probably do it that way. Id put the white fondant on first, then attach the image afterwards. Sometimes when I have someone print the image for me, its not dark, but I imagine you could paint over it if you had to. The other idea I like is the stencil. Ive never done a stencil though so I dont know how difficult that is. Piping it on is going to be difficult. I have a feeling it will be hard to make it look smooth and flawless like the photo. Its not exactly a thin and delicate design. Its big print, you know? Good luck hon! That is such a beautiful cake! I hope you find something that works for you!

joenshan Posted 6 Jun 2010 , 12:40am
post #15 of 32

if you look very closely at the side of the bottom tier, you can see that the black is raised. Maybe gumpaste?

all4cake Posted 6 Jun 2010 , 12:53am
post #16 of 32

The stripes can be airbrushed with minimal teeth blackening. To avoid having to handpipe the design directly onto the surface, the pieces can be made as transfers then attached.
LL

lizabu Posted 6 Jun 2010 , 12:54am
post #17 of 32

You should definately mention the black teeth thing. If you tint the icing with a little cocoa and then color it black you won't need as much food coloring so it might not be as bad. Piping is one option but now that you have the design to trace it's fairly simple to make a stencil. I've made stencils for tuilles and it's pretty simular. At the dollar store they had these cutting boards that roll up that were made out of a flimsy plastic. Just trace the design out and cut out with an exacto knife. I woul ice the dummy and the cake seperately and then stack them and then cover in fondant. You shouldn't need to dowel the dummy but a long dowel through all the tiers might be a good idea.

all4cake Posted 6 Jun 2010 , 1:03am
post #18 of 32

with airbrushing, the color wouldn't be through the entirety of the buttercream and they can simply scrape off the black area (after a few people have sported blackened teeth :-0 )

if not, fondant for the striping.

confectionsofahousewife Posted 6 Jun 2010 , 1:34am
post #19 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by all4cake

The stripes can be airbrushed with minimal teeth blackening. To avoid having to handpipe the design directly onto the surface, the pieces can be made as transfers then attached.




Are you going to loan me your airbrush icon_wink.gif
How did you do that with the pictures?? You're some sort of computer genius! I didn't think of doing it as a transfer. Although I did just find a pattern that I was happy with this afternoon so I guess I didn't have time to think of it yet (I'm slow!). So you're thinking like a frozen buttercream transfer? I have never done one but my understanding is that I would use the pattern I found on the scrabook paper, put wax paper on top, and pipe the design over it, freeze it, and put it on the cake. Is that right?

I think I am definitely going for fondant for the striping. Its the easiest and the bride doesn't care how the stripes get there.

JCE, I like the idea of an edible image too but I have yet to see one that I like that is similar to the pattern on the original cake. I don't have an edible image printer so I don't know if I can use the image on the scrapbook paper and have it printed by someone else (I assume those things are copryrighted)?

As far as stacking the real cake and the dummy, its going to just be covered in buttercream. She doesn't want it fully covered in fondant, just fondant accents if necessary. Is that going to be a problem getting the real and dummy buttercream iced and smooth looking like they are one continuous cake?

So many questions!

tesso Posted 6 Jun 2010 , 1:39am
post #20 of 32

I say get a stencil and hand paint the black design, using amerimist food coloring. would be so much easier.

confectionsofahousewife Posted 6 Jun 2010 , 1:47am
post #21 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by tesso

I say get a stencil and hand paint the black design, using amerimist food coloring. would be so much easier.




I haven't found a stencil that I like! And the idea of cutting one out is....unappealing at best.

all4cake Posted 6 Jun 2010 , 1:53am
post #22 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by confectionsofahousewife

Quote:
Originally Posted by all4cake

The stripes can be airbrushed with minimal teeth blackening. To avoid having to handpipe the design directly onto the surface, the pieces can be made as transfers then attached.



Are you going to loan me your airbrush icon_wink.gif
Are you in my area, for real? I would definitely loan you my airbrush!
How did you do that with the pictures?? I copied the image you shared of your fabric find. Then, pasted it into an image program...trimmed...copied a second one and flipped it.
You're some sort of computer genius! no...I can copy, paste and trim though. lol
I didn't think of doing it as a transfer. Although I did just find a pattern that I was happy with this afternoon so I guess I didn't have time to think of it yet (I'm slow!). So you're thinking like a frozen buttercream transfer? could be buttercream or royal icing (if royal, make sure to allow the pieces to dry in the same shape they'll be applied to when dried...this will also allow you see how it will look when completed.)
I have never done one but my understanding is that I would use the pattern I found on the scrabook paper, put wax paper on top, and pipe the design over it, freeze it, and put it on the cake. Is that right?
thumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gif




The reason I suggest transfers is they can be done ahead of time and to me are so much less stressful than applying contrasting colors directly to a cake surface

lizabu Posted 6 Jun 2010 , 1:54am
post #23 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by confectionsofahousewife


As far as stacking the real cake and the dummy, its going to just be covered in buttercream. She doesn't want it fully covered in fondant, just fondant accents if necessary. Is that going to be a problem getting the real and dummy buttercream iced and smooth looking like they are one continuous cake?




It will work just the same as if it was just cake. Shouldn't be a problem. The painting/stenciling idea above is a good one too. There are numerous materials you can use to make a stencil and now you have a good image to trace out. You can use various types or paper or plastics to cut the image out and then paint the image or stencil in royal icing. Another option I thought of it trace the pattern out on paper, cut it out. Roll out black fondant. Use the pattern to cut around. Lift up the scroll shape and stick to cake (kind of like a do it yourself cricut)

EvMarie Posted 6 Jun 2010 , 2:00am
post #24 of 32

I've done some RI transfers for cookies. Less complicated than for a rounded cake. One tip with those is to always make extras to allow for breakage.

And, the buttercream idea for a transfer is interesting. I've never done one - but, depending upon how it works, you could for sure have a nice flat pattern if you apply the upside to the cake. Leaving the side that set on the counter to be viewed on the cake sides. Does that make sense?

Super easy would be the edible image. I've tried those for cookies and they are quick and have a big impact. My little local cake shop will print out what ever I want on a regular page size for one price. If you have a supply store local, give 'em a call....

Good Luck!

confectionsofahousewife Posted 6 Jun 2010 , 2:03am
post #25 of 32

all4cake- not in your area! I'm in MO. Poo! Perhaps the husband will buy me an airbrush for my upcoming birthday. So can I stick royal to buttercream? It won't melt or anything? Oh, what image program did you use to do that?

lizabu- I like calling that the do it yourself cricut! That's exactly what it is.

Oh and another question about stacking the real cake on top of the dummy. Should the real cake on its own cake board or can it just sit on the dummy? And do I cover the dummy in something before applying buttercream?

confectionsofahousewife Posted 6 Jun 2010 , 2:03am
post #26 of 32

And thank you all for all of your ideas. I really appreciate all the insight!

all4cake Posted 6 Jun 2010 , 3:09am
post #27 of 32

it's a free downloadable program offered at paint.net. Yes, you can attach royal to buttercream. I would put the real cake on its' own board. You don't have to cover it with anything before applying the buttercream.

no airbrush? what about spray color? http://www.wilton.com/store/site/product.cfm?id=3E30CC9B-475A-BAC0-5F9882E09D5A7630&killnav=1

confectionsofahousewife Posted 6 Jun 2010 , 12:21pm
post #28 of 32

Forgot about the wilton color sprays. I have tried the black before though and found it not very dark. It was more of a gray. Has anyone else used it with different results?

Do you think a cake shop would print the image of the scrapbook paper if I scanned it? I don't even know if there is any place here that does that but I would be concerned because it is a copyrighted image.

bmoser24 Posted 7 Jun 2010 , 2:53am
post #29 of 32

I would copy it(it's a fairly common pattern), and take it your grocery store, my Albertsons does transfers for $6, check Wal Mart, ect. Make sure your copy is on card stock for best color, and it might come out slightly smaller on transfer, so adjust if needed.
HTH

confectionsofahousewife Posted 10 Jun 2010 , 6:39pm
post #30 of 32

Alright, I ordered the Modern Wedding Cakes magazine that had this cake on the cover from Global Sugar Art and it arrived yesterday. Unfortunately, there is NO description of the cake in the magazine! Figures. But I was able to find out the name of the (Australian) bakery that made the cake. They are called Sweet Art (www.sweetart.com.au). They do some seriously awesome cakes. Check it out. I sent them an e-mail regarding this cake so hopefully they will respond. I have pretty much settled on hand piping if I can (I am going to practice this weekend) or a buttercream transfer from the scrapbook paper I found. But now I'm just curious how they did it. I can tell from looking closely at the cover of the magazine the design is flat in most places (like it was painted) and then it has some raised areas that look like they were probably piped over with royal. Wish me luck!

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