My First Paid Cake

Decorating By kris10_2 Updated 31 May 2010 , 4:20am by Montrealconfections

kris10_2 Posted 30 May 2010 , 12:36pm
post #1 of 9

I'm so excited because I got my first paid cake job. I priced it out based on number of servings needed and multiplied that by $3.50 per serving. I feel pretty good about the price though likely I won't make too much money because I'll have to buy some product that I don't already have. There will be leftovers though so I won't have to buy it the next time. I have always used homemade fondant but I get so stressed and frustrated with it that I decided to go with Fondarific this time. It is expensive but I've heard great things about it. We only have access to a Michaels here so our only option is nasty Wilton fondant. (I hear they carry Duff brand fondant but I only saw a listing for colors and I prefer to color my own). I am attaching my sketch of it. It's a graduation cake for a girlie girl and her mom wants it to be real girly.

Question for you guys though...is pre-baking and freezing the cakes okay. Do many of you do that in order to save time? I have an excellent and perfectly super moist cake recipe so I'm thinking it shouldn't dry out too much. The cake is to be delivered on June 12. Since I work full time I have only the evenings and the weekends. I thought that getting the cakes made ahead of time and triple wrapped and frozen, it would leave me more time to work on my embellishments.[/img]
LL

8 replies
ladycakes85 Posted 30 May 2010 , 12:42pm
post #2 of 9

Looks like it'll be a cute cake icon_smile.gif Good luck & have fun!
I'm just replying to your comment about the Wilton fondant. I'm not sure if you've seen the other forum posts on here about it, but I can testify to the boxes that I have been buying lately have had updated flavor. I've been using it for the majority of my cakes lately because I always stress out about MMF. But, nobody has complained about the taste, and surprisingly, they've been eating the fondant. I generally don't, because I have a thing with texture, but when I tried a bit, the flavor wasn't bad. icon_smile.gif Just trying to save you some money if you ever decided to give that a try instead.

mamawrobin Posted 30 May 2010 , 12:44pm
post #3 of 9

I read a posts by Sharon (Sugarshack) last night that said she used Wilton for a cake and no one complained about the taste. She also started the tread about Wilton "improving" their fondant.

Occther Posted 30 May 2010 , 12:51pm
post #4 of 9

Kris: To answer your question, I also work full-time so I bake the weekend before, cool my cakes and wrap well with plastic wrap and freeze. I get them out and ice with buttercream on Thursday evening. Then I start my fondant decorating on Friday evening.

mamawrobin Posted 30 May 2010 , 12:59pm
post #5 of 9

Kris, I am so sorry that I failed to answer your question as well. Just as Occther I also bake ahead and freeze. Most of the time I freeze even if I'm using the cakes within a couple of days. I take out and bring to room tempature and fill. Then I wrap in plastic wrap and allow them to settle before crumbcoating and icing/covering with fondant. They should be allowed to "settle" for a few hours to prevent your cake from developing the buldge.

Love your sketch. That's going to be a very pretty cake. thumbs_up.gif

kris10_2 Posted 31 May 2010 , 1:23am
post #6 of 9

Wow, thanks guys for the awesome feedback! I'll definitely take all of it in as I start my creation. I am glad to know I can freeze them beforehand too and I'll definitely let it settle some once I've iced it with my buttercream coating. I never thought about that! I'm super excited about this one. I'll post the final once I'm finished. Thanks again guys!

mamawrobin Posted 31 May 2010 , 1:46am
post #7 of 9

[quote="kris10_2"] I'll definitely let it settle some once I've iced it with my buttercream coating. I never thought about that!


So many times I see someone say "for some reason my cake settled" Cakes settle. They just do. It's important to allow them to do that before moving to the next step. That way you don't have issues with the buldging between layers and sagging fondant.

Can't wait to see your cake. The sketch is adorable. thumbs_up.gif

JustCallMeGidge Posted 31 May 2010 , 4:11am
post #8 of 9

can some one go in to more detail about the crumb coat and settling? Tell me what I have to do and I can do it (if you didnt guess...I am new to this)

Thx!

Montrealconfections Posted 31 May 2010 , 4:20am
post #9 of 9

I got some Wilton fondant in my Cricut Cake box and it does taste better, I can't say I loved the taste of the Fondarific.

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