Frozen Cake Shipped With Dry Ice?? Help

Decorating By ttb Updated 19 Jul 2010 , 4:03am by TuckerCaker

ttb Posted 25 May 2010 , 2:51pm
post #1 of 16

Customer wants to pick up cake on 6/1. Wedding is 6/5. Traveling to Michigan via RV . How in the world would it stay fresh.

If cake is frozen, and packed with dry ice, would this keep it frozen until they reach their destination? If so, how much dry ice would it take?

Is dry ice safe? Would it effect the flavor? So many questions.
I am tempted to call the customer and let her know I cannot do this cake for her. It is a vintage truck for the grooms cake.

Vanilla bean cake with vanilla bean cheescake swirled with strawberry filling.

15 replies
ttb Posted 25 May 2010 , 3:48pm
post #2 of 16

Anyone? Has anyone ever used dry ice to ship a cake. Hopefully someone will read this and reply today so I can get back to the customer.

ttb Posted 25 May 2010 , 5:51pm
post #3 of 16

No one ever shipped a cake? Used dry ice?

ttb Posted 25 May 2010 , 9:22pm
post #4 of 16

Anyone?

sweettreat101 Posted 25 May 2010 , 9:38pm
post #5 of 16

Haven't used it to transport cakes but I have used it to transport crabs from the east coast to the west coast. If you are planning on using dry ice make sure it doesn't touch the cakes it contains chemicals. I don't see why it wouldn't work you would just need to make sure you have a box large enough to place both the cake and the dry ice. How long is the drive? If the cake is frozen I would place it in a box, wrap with a plastic bag to keep it cool and place something over the top like a blanket, sheet or even news papers. I had a wedding cake that wasn't frozen that my mother delivered two hours away and it was fine. Could they get an ice chest big enough to store the cake? Good luck.

klangl Posted 25 May 2010 , 10:08pm
post #6 of 16

From what I understand, you must deliver a shipment using dry ice within a 24 hour time frame, I also it has to be in a pre approved dry ice container, and the vehicle must be labeled as such with "hazardous warning".
Have you just considered making the cake to fit within the freezer of the RV. If its a Motor home they can keep the freezer running non-stop. hth.

Karen421 Posted 25 May 2010 , 10:29pm
post #7 of 16

Is the cake bc or fondant? and are they driving straight (non-stop) or taking a couple of days to get there?

JudyDP Posted 25 May 2010 , 10:37pm
post #8 of 16

I probably shouldn't reply here, but I will. icon_biggrin.gif A bakery in California shipped a chocolate birthday cake for me to my little nephew in Afghanistan...Actually, I guess he isn't so "little" anymore....he's a Sergent in the Marines! icon_eek.gif It arrived 3 WEEKS LATER!!! His wife told me he said IT WAS GOOD!!! Abviously, it can be done.....I suppose it would just depend on the ingredients. Good Luck!

Jeep_girl816 Posted 25 May 2010 , 11:01pm
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweettreat101

Haven't used it to transport cakes but I have used it to transport crabs from the east coast to the west coast. If you are planning on using dry ice make sure it doesn't touch the cakes it contains chemicals.


I never knew this! icon_eek.gif When I was in elementary school (in the 80's) no Halloween party was complete with out punch "smoking" from a big chunk of dry ice floating in it! We had them at school, private parties, everywhere it was the norm! Hmm learn something new everyday I guess!

coldtropics Posted 25 May 2010 , 11:03pm
post #10 of 16

i have " shipped" a cake to myself.... actually took it on a plane.... 4 tiers for a wedding cake and it was fine. i individually boxed each cake after freezing, wrapping in saran wrap then foil. placed those boxes inside of a sturdy corrugated box lining between each box sides top and bottom with styrofoam sheets to insulate and prevent any shifting. used ice packs to keep frozen.... the type that are almost weightless then you soak in water to bloom them then freeze. hope this makes sense.... the cakes will stsy frozen/chilled w no problem

ttb Posted 26 May 2010 , 2:04am
post #11 of 16

cake will be vanilla bean with strawberry cheesecake swirl, butter cream icing, covered in candy clay.

The color is candy apple red. Do you think this would sweat and run if it is candy clay, or if it was butter cream??

ttb Posted 26 May 2010 , 2:19am
post #12 of 16

cake will be vanilla bean with strawberry cheesecake swirl, butter cream icing, covered in candy clay.

The color is candy apple red. Do you think this would sweat and run if it is candy clay, or if it was butter cream??

ttb Posted 26 May 2010 , 2:22am
post #13 of 16

cake will be vanilla bean with strawberry cheesecake swirl, butter cream icing, covered in candy clay.

The color is candy apple red. Do you think this would sweat and run if it is candy clay, or if it was butter cream??

all4cake Posted 26 May 2010 , 2:40am
post #14 of 16

I don't remember who, but it's been discussed on CC about shipping cakes using dry ice. Although you aren't shipping it but kinda sorta are...it's being transported...maybe those previous threads on "shipping cakes" or "how to ship cakes" will help...

sweettreat101 Posted 27 May 2010 , 7:52am
post #15 of 16

What about shipping UPS or FED EX? It might be pricey but they do have ways of shipping items that need to be kept cold or frozen. Just add in the cost of shipping. If they want your cakes they will have to pay.

TuckerCaker Posted 19 Jul 2010 , 4:03am
post #16 of 16

Good luck shipping your cake. For future shipping of cakes with dry ice, I recommend reading an article at http://cpa.utk.edu/pdffiles/cpa81.pdf. I saw this posted on this dry ice website. You can ship things, but there are guidelines.

P.S. I read a note saying that dry ice contained chemicals. This is not true. Dry ice is nothing but frozen CO2 (the same stuff we exhale).

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