dmo4ab Posted 1 Mar 2010 , 9:39pm
post #1 of

I've got to make and 80's theme tiered cake for a birthday party this weekend. The client wants to top layer to have a paint splatter effect. Any ideas of what type of icing would do this well. I was hoping to actually really splatter it from a brush, not just try to duplicate the looking with piping. It's going on a base of crusting cream cheese frosting.

Any ideas?

14 replies
ninatat Posted 1 Mar 2010 , 10:14pm
post #2 of

maybe bright colored piping gel, does she want it to look like small splatters like when i paint lol and it spatters all over the drop cloths, you could use a tooth brush and point down da, an run your thumb kind of hard on the colored brush, that's is how i do it with my acrylic paints, you might want to go to the dollar store. get a firm brush, not soft hope this helps and i'll give you a bump

kakeladi Posted 2 Mar 2010 , 12:35am
post #3 of

Have an old toothbrush laying around? 1st soak it inb alchol, let dry then use a drop of liquid food coloring (paste jel probably would work too) and turn it upsidce down and run your finger over the bristles. Coat your finger w/Crisco or wear a glove.

SandiOh Posted 2 Mar 2010 , 12:48am
post #4 of

I did it recently, but on fondant (see my tiara cake)...I don't know why it wouldn't work on a crusting type frosting....but I just used a paintbrush with some gelcolor thinned out with vodka and just splattered it over the cake...I did have to cover my entire table in newspaper first....

metria Posted 2 Mar 2010 , 12:55am
post #5 of

I made drippy snow with thinned royal icing (like for flooding). Is this the effect you might be looking for?

Image

metria Posted 2 Mar 2010 , 12:56am
post #6 of

i guess that's more cartoony and not realistic. oh well, an idea if you decide to go that way.

jenmat Posted 2 Mar 2010 , 1:00am
post #7 of

I used to do this all the time with airbrush color. Just drop little droplets on the icing, then "blow" it around with the airbrush stream. Just make sure the colors will be complimentary so when they blend they don't make brown or grey- like pink, yellow and orange, or blue and green.
I think we had to do this in kindergarten, that's where i got it. Good luck!

Nytepyre Posted 2 Mar 2010 , 4:01am
post #8 of

dmo4ab - I think fondant or a crusting buttercream would both hold a light splattering very well, obviously fondant would hold it more! A thin RI or vodka with gel color will probably be your best bet for splattering! GL!

Deenamgall Posted 2 Mar 2010 , 2:33pm
post #9 of

I did this for a 16th Birthday just last week!

I Just thinned buttercream to very runny consistency, then took a paint brush that had a big head(an artists brush, but I think a regular one would work too!) and flicked it toward the cake. Going in different directions around and on top of the cake!

I also wanted to write on the top of the cake, so I cut a piece of waxed paper into an oval and centered it on the cake top. Once I was done splattering , just picked up the paper and finished the cake.

I put waxed paper under the board to catch what didn't land on the cake. I just did one color at a time. I used pink, blue, green and yellow colors. It really looked cool! They were extremely happy with it too!

JenniferAtwood Posted 3 Mar 2010 , 4:54am
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deenamgall

I did this for a 16th Birthday just last week!

I Just thinned buttercream to very runny consistency, then took a paint brush that had a big head(an artists brush, but I think a regular one would work too!) and flicked it toward the cake. Going in different directions around and on top of the cake!




This is how I do it also. The thinned buttercream allows you to "play" with the colors more.

Nytepyre Posted 3 Mar 2010 , 5:24am
Quote:
Originally Posted by JenniferAtwood

Quote:
Originally Posted by Deenamgall

I did this for a 16th Birthday just last week!

I Just thinned buttercream to very runny consistency, then took a paint brush that had a big head(an artists brush, but I think a regular one would work too!) and flicked it toward the cake. Going in different directions around and on top of the cake!



This is how I do it also. The thinned buttercream allows you to "play" with the colors more.




I hadn't thought of doing it that way, but it does seem like it would be more dynamic and more vivid in the coloration too! This is why I love CC, something new to learn and inspirations to be gathered every single day!

dmo4ab Posted 7 Mar 2010 , 3:32am

Thanks everyone. I went with the thinned RI and toothbrush method. It worked pretty good. Check out the pics. It was also my first time working much with MMF for some deco on the bottom layer.
LL
LL

bakerylady Posted 24 Jun 2013 , 7:17pm

have a pic of your cake...I got a request to do one July 20th..would like to see a pic of it, thank you

Evy911 Posted 17 Jul 2013 , 4:05pm

I haven't tried the splatter paint method yet but will do it this week. For my daughter's wedding cake I mixed cornstarch with a little water to the consistency I wanted and then added black cake color. I then painted on the design and it worked great. I will use the cornstarch mix again for the splatter and it should work. Here is a picture of the cake I painted.*

LizzieAylett Posted 17 Jul 2013 , 4:52pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by jenmat 

I used to do this all the time with airbrush color. Just drop little droplets on the icing, then "blow" it around with the airbrush stream. Just make sure the colors will be complimentary so when they blend they don't make brown or grey- like pink, yellow and orange, or blue and green.
I think we had to do this in kindergarten, that's where i got it. Good luck!


I did this once in primary school, but got confused and sucked instead of blowing!  My mouth was a rather lovely shade of blue for the rest of the day... :-P

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