luv2bake6 Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 10:39pm
post #1 of

I got an order last week for a certain amount of cookies in 4 different shapes. I quoted her how much each cookie would cost (different shapes), she agreed and then told me how many of each cookie she needed.
I spent a lot of time on these cookies (very detailed) and when i finally emailed to say they were ready for pickup and quoted the total price. she answered back asking if i was sure that was the total cuz it sounded very high. I sent back the original email where i quoted her the price per cookie and her telling me how many she wanted (that's what's great about email, there's always proof). Havent heard back yet.

37 replies
ShiaCakes Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 10:43pm
post #2 of

Yuo don't have jack squat for proof of anything. You didn't collect money before you begn baking those cookies. So sorry this happened to you, but this is why professionals collect money and most times, do a contract for their services.

ShiaCakes Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 10:46pm
post #3 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by luv2bake6

I sent back the original email where i quoted her the price per cookie and her telling me how many she wanted (that's what's great about email, there's always proof). Havent heard back yet.




And she was perfectly within right to balk at the price later. Because that's what people do when they weren't obligated in the first place.

luv2bake6 Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 10:48pm
post #4 of

You are 100% right about the professional and stores taking deposits or making contracts, but i do not have an official business and am just taking occasional orders from word of mouth.
What i meant about proof was that i was able to show her the physical discussion as opposed to having a telephone or face to face conversation where it's one word against the other's.

Kitagrl Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 10:54pm
post #5 of

You really do need a deposit. icon_sad.gif Even if you are not a real business, you should still accept some money to prove they are seriously wanting your cookies. Even better...accept prepayment in your case. When you order something online, who does their part first...the customer? (Payment) Or the business? Last time I ordered on Amazon, I had to pay first....I would definitely do that too if I were you and you aren't comfortable with deposits and such.

And believe it or not...saying "$4/each for 25 cookies" does NOT mean the person understands it costs $100. For real! I've sent emails...the person will say "I want 25 servings" and I say "25 servings is fine...I charge $5/serving" and they will write back and say "Then how much will my total be?"

Not kidding.

ShiaCakes Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 10:54pm
post #6 of

But you do have a business, you exchanged goods for services performed. I'm not nit picking this with you, I'm pointing out that it's silly to go to a lot of trouble slaving yourself over cookies to get a response like that. When you hold someone to a written agreement, get payment in advance, there are no problems.

RachieRach Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 12:00am
post #7 of

So sorry this happened! It sounds like you never fully confirmed the order? I only ask for deposits if the order is over $200 but i do send an invoice asking for confirmation of order before making the cookies. I also use this invoice to confirm delivery/ pick-up date and time. But I am investigating on-line payment options as it would be eaiser to have customers pay in advance.

I'm so sorry this happened. Not sure how big the order was but could you repurpose the cookies as samples to give out to local businesses who may someday order from you or donate them? We all get burned once but hopefully make adjustments so that it doesn't happen again.

bonniebakes Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 12:19am
post #8 of

so sorry this happened to you! I understand how frustrating it must have been!

mamawrobin Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 12:31am
post #9 of

So...I'm curious, have you heard anything from her since your last e-mail? Did she not want the cookies after all or is she just arguing the price? I'd definetely get a deposit or full payment on my next order. Good luck icon_wink.gif .

Dolledupcakes Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 12:35am

Contract and a deposit. That is what you need. Sorry this happened to you. I know how you feel. Hopefully next time you know what to do.

LaBellaFlor Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 12:37am

Oo, does that bite! Thats why you should NEVER play at business. Written agreement and deposit, always.

mamawrobin Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 12:41am
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaBellaFlor

Oo, does that bite! Thats why you should NEVER play at business. Written agreement and deposit, always.




YEP!

jlynnw Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 12:47am

Wow, sorry this happened like this. Looking back it is easy to say how things should be or how others would do it. But I would love to see how they turned out at least.

LaBellaFlor Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 12:51am

And your cookies are so pretty. That really SUCKS!

TracyLH Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 1:18am

Oh, I am SO sorry to read this! I do hope that it works out for you. So tough to deal with after all of that hard work. icon_sad.gif Hopefully when she sees the e-mail and realizes her error, that this will be resolved. Again, so sorry you are dealing with this.

costumeczar Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 1:38am

Get a deposit next time, or payment in full if it's below a certain amount. Remember my new favorite saying: It's better to not do the work and not get paid, than to do the work and not get paid.

luv2bake6 Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 4:04am

Wow, you gals are all very sweet.
It all turned out ok. The woman did pick up her order and did pay me. The lesson learned here (aside from asking for some or all the money in advance) is to take the communication one more level by actually giving the total amount and not rely on the customer to figure it out based on per cookie price.
Thank you all for empathizing with me; you are the only ones who can truly understand this.

mamawrobin Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 4:16am
Quote:
Originally Posted by luv2bake6

Wow, you gals are all very sweet.
It all turned out ok. The woman did pick up her order and did pay me. The lesson learned here (aside from asking for some or all the money in advance) is to take the communication one more level by actually giving the total amount and not rely on the customer to figure it out based on per cookie price.
Thank you all for empathizing with me; you are the only ones who can truly understand this.




Happy to hear ya got your money! Thanks for letting us know how it turned out for you.

KHalstead Posted 26 Feb 2010 , 5:42pm

Glad it turned out well, I've got a big order going myself right now

7 mini cc bouquets -$15/each
50 mod mom cookies-$1.50/each (in bag w/ paper tags and labels)
I quoted her $180 for that
Then she called and ordered twill cookies that you lay over a cup when they're hot to make a little flower shaped bowl to put sorbet in. I told her $1 each. but there's too much humidity and they wouldn't set up, so now I'm painted cupcake wrappers w/ chocolate to make little chocolate cups for her sorbet.
I told her $1 each for those.....so her total is now $230. Mind you most of my wedding cakes don't cost this much!! Hopefully she's not disgusted with my novice decorating skills!

Kitagrl Posted 26 Feb 2010 , 5:48pm

Only $1.50 for mom cookies wrapped and labelled?

idjiliak Posted 26 Feb 2010 , 5:50pm

Oh dear, that is not very much money.

KHalstead Posted 26 Feb 2010 , 10:14pm

I know, and I don't get to sell many cookies because people around here think I'm too expensive! LOL

edited to say: I know it seems rather cheap, I already decorated them and they took me about 1-1/2 hrs. to do all 50 and I spent about $8 total for bags, paper, and ingredients and I charged $75/so I'm ok with that!

Kitagrl Posted 26 Feb 2010 , 10:22pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by KHalstead

I know, and I don't get to sell many cookies because people around here think I'm too expensive! LOL

edited to say: I know it seems rather cheap, I already decorated them and they took me about 1-1/2 hrs. to do all 50 and I spent about $8 total for bags, paper, and ingredients and I charged $75/so I'm ok with that!




That's baking, decorating, dry time, and packaging time??? You're speedy!

KHalstead Posted 26 Feb 2010 , 10:37pm

that's just decorating time........it took me about an hr. to make dough and bake as well and I made the icing while they were baking...so honestly I may have put about 3 hrs. into them so far, and will probably devote another hour with the bagging and labelling tomorrow. i don't count drying time, because they're sitting there and don't require my attention.

However.......you're talkin to someone that is constantly told that I charge WAY too much for a 1/4 sheet cake (I charge $20!!!) these people are crazy! lol

cylstrial Posted 26 Feb 2010 , 10:44pm

I'm really glad that it worked out for you! But definitely give all customers a full total. And get at least a 50% deposit! And definitely get them to sign a contract. It protects both of you!

artscallion Posted 26 Feb 2010 , 10:53pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by luv2bake6

Wow, you gals are all very sweet.
It all turned out ok. The woman did pick up her order and did pay me. The lesson learned here (aside from asking for some or all the money in advance) is to take the communication one more level by actually giving the total amount and not rely on the customer to figure it out based on per cookie price.
Thank you all for empathizing with me; you are the only ones who can truly understand this.




Glad it turned out well for you this time. But remember, confirming, even total amounts, by email is still not a contract, and not proof of anything. An email is editable...by either party! And thus not proof of anything. She could claim that you changed the email. Or she could change the email and use it as proof right back at ya.

cakesbycathy Posted 28 Feb 2010 , 11:01pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by KHalstead

I know, and I don't get to sell many cookies because people around here think I'm too expensive! LOL

edited to say: I know it seems rather cheap, I already decorated them and they took me about 1-1/2 hrs. to do all 50 and I spent about $8 total for bags, paper, and ingredients and I charged $75/so I'm ok with that!




okay you and I are in the same area and I sell my cookies for $3 a piece. If they complain about the price tell them to check out cookies by design icon_smile.gif

Spectra Posted 1 Mar 2010 , 3:14pm

Seriously, I was at Second Cup yesterday, and they get these types of cookies shipped in, with the RI icing on them. They charge about $3.00 a cookie and they don't look nearly as nice as your guys' and they are definitely not baked in store, or even within 1000 miles... lol

l80bug79 Posted 1 Mar 2010 , 3:46pm

question.....for all of you who posted that she should have gotten a contract first, how does that work when you're not running a licensed bakery? How can you "enforce" the contract when it would say contract between client and abc cakes when abc cakes isn't a legal intity? I ask this because I lost a Silver Cake base with one of my brides when she just seemed to disappear after the wedding. I did get a deposit for the rental and made enough on the wedding cake to buy a new one, but it's the principal of the matter. I had gotten it for a really good price. one of the reasons i don't go after the decidio leads as hot and heavy anymore.

most of my business comes from people that I know, and the few that I don't know I require a deposit up front. I send the customer a quote once they accept the price, I basically change it to an invoice, email it showing the amount of deposit due and the balance due at delivery. I'm not licensed as of yet but have contacted the dept of Ag about kitchen rental.

antonia74 Posted 1 Mar 2010 , 3:58pm

You don't have to be licensed to draw up a contract for anything. I've written one at a yard sale! icon_lol.gif I wasn't having a "licensed yard sale"....it's a piece of paper that shows that two people have an agreement for the exchange of goods/services and explains the who/what/where/when/why/how of what's happening between them both. That certainly applies in this case.

As to whether or not it's "binding" isn't determined by whether or not you've got a legal kitchen. It's more about it being clearly stated on the contract what's going to happen and signed/dated by both parties.

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