Whipped Cream Icing To Decorate With? ...please Shoot Me...

Decorating By TxBama Updated 1 Jul 2016 , 8:46pm by ElizabethsCakeCreations

TxBama Posted 11 Jan 2010 , 3:36pm
post #1 of 38

I have a lady wanting a DECORATED bulldozer cake out of whipped cream frosting....can this even be done? I see the Wilton vanilla whipped icing mix, but have never used it. Is it stabil enough to be tinted, able to smooth, able to pipe??? I am attaching a picture of the cake she wants, BUT with the whipped icing. I need help or a gun.....
LL

37 replies
jammjenks Posted 11 Jan 2010 , 3:48pm
post #2 of 38

I tell anyone who calls me, "I cannot decorate with whip cream icing." I don't even do the whipped bc types. I don't have any experience with the Wilton product you mentioned, so I can't help you there. Sometimes the customer doesn't have a clue that something won't work for the design they want. We just have to educate them a bit. icon_wink.gif

all4cake Posted 11 Jan 2010 , 3:57pm
post #3 of 38

it can definitely be done in Bettercreme(Sam's club carries it among others)

ddaigle Posted 11 Jan 2010 , 4:02pm
post #4 of 38

Agree with all4cake. I have smooth iced and piped with Bettercreme from Sam's.

TxBama Posted 11 Jan 2010 , 4:07pm
post #5 of 38

And the Bettercreme ~ it is already whipped up? Def checking out Sam's ~ Thanks soooo much everyone. Annnnndddddd, Jammjenks, in the future I will follow your advise and say no it won't work! icon_smile.gif

tab_stout Posted 11 Jan 2010 , 4:10pm
post #6 of 38

I'm no expert, but I have used Rich's bettercreme from GFS and it was hard to tint dark colors. I could only do pastel colors. I have taken wilton's color spray and sprayed it on the icing and it worked well. You may want to ask someone who has worked with it alot how they get dark colors with whipped icing.

Sassy74 Posted 11 Jan 2010 , 4:12pm
post #7 of 38

I recently did a wedding cake for a couple who are diabetics. My Sams doesn't carry Bettercreme, so I had to just make stabilized whipped icing with gelatin, sugar substitute, and heavy whipping cream. The icing tasted great, but was NO FUN to smooth. I had to keep it chilled and work with it quickly. I smoothed it with a warm large spatula. I have to say it piped out very well, though, as long as it was chilled. The heat from my hands warmed it up quickly. Hopefully the other products you mentioned will work better. I quickly realized that I DO NOT want to work with that icing again LOL! I'd be interested to hear how the other products work though. Best wishes for your cake!

all4cake Posted 11 Jan 2010 , 5:01pm
post #8 of 38

Sassy74, does your Sam's not have a bakery dept.? I was told(as an employee) that all Sam's used the same products. The Bettercreme has to be requested/sometimes pe-ordering is required from the bakery dept associates.

There's another thread that has the item and plu #s required to purchase it. The bakery dept. has a book with all the numbers listed....sometimes, you get to arrive when the only one that is available to help is "the new girl" or someone unfamiliar from the meat/deli dept and having those #s is highly beneficial to both you and them.

Another option, with the approval of the customer, would be to ice it in bettercreme then, do a full top rbct...it'd be a thin layer of buttercream....

ETA: yes, it's pre-whipped(keep it frozen...only take out the day before what you plan on using for the next week or so)

and for the darker colors...I would take a small portion(keep the remaining icing refrigerated) and color that extremely dark.Then, add more of the chilled icing to it. Mixing causes it to become airy/dry/floam-like...adding fresh, chilled to it, revives it. Ice the cake while it's cold...not frozen...just really really cold...work quickly with the colors 'cause they tend to do the morphing thing faster than uncolored icing.

ddaigle Posted 11 Jan 2010 , 5:34pm
post #9 of 38

Sassy, I'm in Baton Rouge and the only way I can buy Bettercream is in that gigantic tub from the bakery. I think it's 30+ dollars. You have to ask a bakery person and they get it from the cooler. I keep it in the freezer and take out what I need.

all4cake Posted 11 Jan 2010 , 5:56pm
post #10 of 38

30 bucks????????? sure that ain't the buttercream? 'cause the last time I got bettercreme(last month) it was less than 20(gone up a couple of dollars from the previous price of 17.66)

Sassy74 Posted 11 Jan 2010 , 6:37pm
post #11 of 38

ddaigle and all4cake, thanks for your replies! I knew the lady at my Sams didn't really know what I was talking about because she didn't even work in that dept all the time. I didn't try to get a lot of info from her because she was sort of clueless! Y'all have inspired me to ask again, and to find someone who WORKS there! I've heard so much about Bettercreme here on the boards and I've wanted to try it...

verosuperstar Posted 12 Jan 2010 , 12:41am
post #12 of 38

Is that bettercream the same than coolwhip? One of my friends just called me to ask for a dora cake but with coolwhip, she said she bought one from Walmart 2 weeks ago and she liked the icing. I told her I was going to try because haven't worked with it at all. I told her usually you can't decorate with coolwhip. How do you prepare the cool whip frosting?

Veronica

all4cake Posted 12 Jan 2010 , 12:53am
post #13 of 38

It's not the same as cool whip but it is probably what she got on her Wal~Mart cake.

ddaigle Posted 12 Jan 2010 , 1:56pm
post #14 of 38

Bettercream to me, tastes like Dream Whip..if you've ever made/tasted that. To me, it is more firmer than cool whip. I wish I could buy it in a smaller quantity, or make it as I need it, but I don't have that choice. Only the monster tub.

tab_stout Posted 12 Jan 2010 , 2:01pm
post #15 of 38

Thanks all4cake on the tip how to get your darker colors! I will be trying it soon. I just started using bettercreme and I love it. I just couldn't figure out how to get the coloring right.

Renaejrk Posted 12 Jan 2010 , 2:13pm
post #16 of 38

My husband loves the whipped type icing, but I haven't tried it yet. I don't like to buy pre-made stuff - storage is a difficulty. I would imagine it would be more difficult to work with, but taste nice! I'm not sure what recipes would come out to be like what he's wanting.

Good luck with the cake and let us know how it turns out! I'm curious to see!

Jeana77 Posted 12 Jan 2010 , 2:28pm
post #17 of 38

I use Cool Whip to decorate most of my cakes. It works great for the most part. I stand right next to my fridge when using it as it needs to be kept cold at all times. I use the plastic "easy accent decorator" from pampered chef (Wilton sells them too) so that the warmth of my hands does not melt the cool whip. I recently purchased some bettercreme and used it on a couple of cakes, however my customers prefer the cool whip. You can decorate with buttercream on top of the cake or place fondant figures on top also. I would not recommend trying to decorate the sides of the cake though. The cool whip is too soft to hold the weight of the frosting. You can place decorations near the bottom of the cake on the board. Look at my photos to get a better idea. Like I said most of them are frosted with cool whip. The tiered red and white wedding cake is even frosted with it!

Win Posted 12 Jan 2010 , 2:53pm
post #18 of 38

Stabilizing whipped cream is easier than falling off a log. No artificial taste, pure goodness! icon_biggrin.gif
--------------------------------
1 tsp. unflavored gelatin
1 c. heavy whipping cream, at least 24 hours old
4 tsp. cold water
1/4 c. powdered sugar
1/4 tsp. vanilla

Combine gelatin and water. Let stand until thick. Then place over low heat, stirring constantly, until gelatin dissolves, which takes about 3 minutes. Whip cream with 1/4 cup confectioners' sugar and 1/4 teaspoon vanilla, just until it is slightly thickened. While beating slowly, gradually add gelatin to whipped cream mixture. Whip at high speed until stiff. Cakes frosted with whipped cream should always be refrigerated.

all4cake Posted 12 Jan 2010 , 3:02pm
post #19 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Win

Stabilizing whipped cream is easier than falling off a log. No artificial taste, pure goodness! icon_biggrin.gif
--------------------------------
1 tsp. unflavored gelatin
1 c. heavy whipping cream, at least 24 hours old
4 tsp. cold water
1/4 c. powdered sugar
1/4 tsp. vanilla

Combine gelatin and water. Let stand until thick. Then place over low heat, stirring constantly, until gelatin dissolves, which takes about 3 minutes. Whip cream with 1/4 cup confectioners' sugar and 1/4 teaspoon vanilla, just until it is slightly thickened. While beating slowly, gradually add gelatin to whipped cream mixture. Whip at high speed until stiff. Cakes frosted with whipped cream should always be refrigerated.




How does one keep from having the gelatin do that stringy thing? I've only attempted it like twice in the last 35 or so years and each time, following the directions above, the gelatin distributed into like stringy things throughout the whipped cream. After the last time, like 10 years ago, I said "ah, man...forget this!"

Win Posted 12 Jan 2010 , 3:23pm
post #20 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by all4cake

Quote:
Originally Posted by Win

Stabilizing whipped cream is easier than falling off a log. No artificial taste, pure goodness! icon_biggrin.gif
--------------------------------
1 tsp. unflavored gelatin
1 c. heavy whipping cream, at least 24 hours old
4 tsp. cold water
1/4 c. powdered sugar
1/4 tsp. vanilla

Combine gelatin and water. Let stand until thick. Then place over low heat, stirring constantly, until gelatin dissolves, which takes about 3 minutes. Whip cream with 1/4 cup confectioners' sugar and 1/4 teaspoon vanilla, just until it is slightly thickened. While beating slowly, gradually add gelatin to whipped cream mixture. Whip at high speed until stiff. Cakes frosted with whipped cream should always be refrigerated.



How does one keep from having the gelatin do that stringy thing? I've only attempted it like twice in the last 35 or so years and each time, following the directions above, the gelatin distributed into like stringy things throughout the whipped cream. After the last time, like 10 years ago, I said "ah, man...forget this!"




icon_sad.gif I have never had anything stringy happen. Hmmm.... very interesting. detective.gif You must use heavy cream, and you must allow the gelatin to thicken then dissolve over the heat and you add it slowly (not all at once --sort of drizzled in.) Other than that, I cannot think of a variable that would cause it to become stringy.

all4cake Posted 12 Jan 2010 , 3:29pm
post #21 of 38

hmmmmmmmm...maybe I didn't drizzle the gelatin in slow enough...that's the only thing I can think of...it wasn't all at once though.

How would a person tell if their hwc is at least 24 hours old? I don't live on a farm...wouldn't all of it bought at the store be at least 24 hours old? Just askin'...

Renaejrk Posted 12 Jan 2010 , 3:38pm
post #22 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by all4cake

How would a person tell if their hwc is at least 24 hours old? I don't live on a farm...wouldn't all of it bought at the store be at least 24 hours old? Just askin'...




That is so what I was thinking! Do you just mean you've had it for at least 24 hours?

Win Posted 12 Jan 2010 , 3:43pm
post #23 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Renaejrk

Quote:
Originally Posted by all4cake

How would a person tell if their hwc is at least 24 hours old? I don't live on a farm...wouldn't all of it bought at the store be at least 24 hours old? Just askin'...



That is so what I was thinking! Do you just mean you've had it for at least 24 hours?




Sorry... I keep that typed up from an old recipe handed down...
But, the answer is yes. When I buy Heavy Whipping Cream in the grocery, and know I am going to use it right away, I buy the one closest to the expiration date. It whips better. If I know I am not going to use it right away, but want it on hand, I buy the one with the further out expiration date. Also, HEAVY whipping cream is different than WHIPPING cream. Whipping cream does not whip up as stiffly.

all4cake Posted 12 Jan 2010 , 3:56pm
post #24 of 38

I use hwc and have no problem whipping it stiff...it was just the issue of the stringyness(?)...I'll try it again and try drizzling slower. I don't have the issue of the stringy thing when making mousse but the gelatin get incorporated with something else before the whipped cream gets folded in....hmmmmm ...I have a thought goin' there...

newmansmom2004 Posted 12 Jan 2010 , 4:05pm
post #25 of 38

Flavor-Right makes a couple different whipped toppings that should work. They come in quart size containers (I think they might have larger ones, too) and they're frozen. Just let them thaw then whip them up. They taste really good, too, without being overly sweet.

I purchased some at a local AGS cake supply store in San Antonio.

Win Posted 12 Jan 2010 , 4:09pm
post #26 of 38

All4cake:
There really are other variables after I got to thinking about it... it's just one of those things I've done so often, I take it for granted. However, it is important to allow the melted gelatin to cool for a few minutes --if it is too hot it will deflate the whipped cream. As well, if it is too cool it won't incorporate (and that might be what happened to you causing the stringiness.) As well, you want to add the gelatin before the whipping cream forms soft peaks. My recipe says when thickened, but I think it's better described as "before" you hit the soft peak point. After you hit soft peak, you increase the amount of whipping.

I also know a woman who simply uses corn syrup to stabilize her whipped cream. No gelatin involved. I think it's like a teaspoon of corn syrup to a cup of heavy whipping cream...

Kitagrl Posted 12 Jan 2010 , 4:13pm
post #27 of 38

Do you put the gelatin mixture in when its still warm? Seems like the cream would not whip up right...?

all4cake Posted 12 Jan 2010 , 4:15pm
post #28 of 38

That might be it...maybe the gelatin was too warm and when it hit the coldness of the cream...solidified somewhat. That makes sense and definitely a logical(more fitting to my particular situation) explanation.

newmansmom2004 Posted 12 Jan 2010 , 4:20pm
post #29 of 38

There's also a product called "Whip It" that comes in small envelope. You mix it with whipped cream for a stabilized whipped icing. My cake instructor loves this stuff. You can find it at most gourmet grocery stores and even some mainstream stores. Or you can order it from Amazon.


http://www.amazon.com/dp/B000GZYBCW/?tag=cakecentral-20

Win Posted 12 Jan 2010 , 4:20pm
post #30 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitagrl

Do you put the gelatin mixture in when its still warm? Seems like the cream would not whip up right...?




No, not warm... cooled for a bit, but not too cool either. It's the "Goldilocks" equation --not too hot, not too cold... just right. icon_lol.gif

I learned it from my mom when I was quite young so it just comes natural. It's funny when you start to really "gunkulate" the process, you realize there is more involved. icon_biggrin.gif

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