Trouble Doing The Most Simplest Of Things :(

Decorating By nastassia Updated 8 Jan 2010 , 7:52pm by Caths_Cakes

nastassia Posted 6 Jan 2010 , 2:52am
post #1 of 31

ok this sounds dumb but I always have trouble taking my cake outta the pan w/o it breaking or sticking....I usually spray with pam and use flour then I wait ten minutes and try taking it out...but usually a part tears off from me which I sometimes can hide, but it bugs that I can't get my cakes perfectly out of the pans icon_sad.gif

any tips??

30 replies
JanH Posted 6 Jan 2010 , 2:58am
post #2 of 31

You can make your own pan grease by mixing equal parts: shortening, flour and vegetable oil.

To prevent the bottoms from sticking you can line the pan with either parchment or wax paper.

How to grease cake pans and/or line with parchment or waxed paper:
(Also shows how to collar a pan.)

http://www.akiskitchen.ca/techniques/greasing_cake_pans/grease_pans_1.html#greasedandpaper

It also helps to run a straight edge around the pan edges prior to turning out onto the cooling rack.

HTH

Texas_Rose Posted 6 Jan 2010 , 3:17am
post #3 of 31

The spray with the flour in it works great. I never wanted to buy it because it was more expensive than plain pam spray, but once I tried it I was hooked on it. Also, leave the cake in the pan for ten minutes when it comes out of the oven, then turn it onto a cooling grid. Set a timer for the ten minutes, if you leave it too long then it will start sticking even with the flour spray.

Cristi-Tutty Posted 6 Jan 2010 , 3:17am
post #4 of 31

hello let me tell you that I also had that problem until I remembered what my grandma used to do...I cover my whole pan with crisco then with flour ...and when I get my cakes out of the oven I just wait a couple of minutes until the pan has cooled enough to hold without protection and then I take the cake out without any damage...

Cristi-Tutty Posted 6 Jan 2010 , 3:20am
post #5 of 31

the flour has to cover the whole pan too...do not put to much of it

newmansmom2004 Posted 6 Jan 2010 , 3:23am
post #6 of 31

I spray my pan with Crisco non-stick spray, then put a piece of parchment on the bottom only, making sure it fits properly, covering the entire bottom of the pan. I've never lost a cake this way!

Lita829 Posted 6 Jan 2010 , 3:33am
post #7 of 31

I used to never use parchment but then I noticed that the cakes with oil as the fat, instead of butter, will definately stick...not matter how much shortening and flour I used to prepare the pans. I now always put shortening and flour on the sides and parchment, cut to fit the pan, on the bottom.

lngo Posted 6 Jan 2010 , 3:46am
post #8 of 31

I recently started using the homemade cake release, and I love it. I've not had a problem using Pam spray, but I notice that the homemade cake release leaves fewer crumbs on the pan. Plus, the cake release is a whole lot cheaper to make than buying Pam.

CakeMommyTX Posted 6 Jan 2010 , 3:47am
post #9 of 31

I use Bakers Joy (spray w/ flour) after losing a few to many cakes to Pam and flour. Never had a problem since.
I leave in for 10 minutes and flip.

prterrell Posted 6 Jan 2010 , 3:48am
post #10 of 31

Are you turning the cakes out onto a cooling rack or trying to lift them out with a spatula?

YesiBoo Posted 6 Jan 2010 , 4:19am
post #11 of 31

I always spray my pans with Pam and line the bottom of the pan with parchment paper...it works every time just perfect!!

joy5678 Posted 6 Jan 2010 , 4:35am
post #12 of 31

The homemade cake release it the quickest, cheapest and easiest way to go. I take my cakes right out of the oven, press the "hump" down with clean dishtowel (you can let it cool abit but I'm always in a hurry) flip out onto saranwrap, wrap completely & pop it directly into freezer to seal in the moisture. Never had a problem and always have a good moist cake. TMI, my bad. Just got excited icon_smile.gif

joy5678 Posted 6 Jan 2010 , 4:38am
post #13 of 31

Sorry, I almost forgot......having some good cake pans also helps.

andpotts Posted 6 Jan 2010 , 4:46am
post #14 of 31

I love, love, love Wilton Cake Release, it has never ever failed me and I don't have to use that much so a bottle last for a while. I always buy an extra when I have a spare 50% off coupon.

If doing the grease & flour method, something I learned in school was to use powdered sugar insted of flour, works well and no flour residue on your layers icon_smile.gif

Hang in there, it's not a dumb question. I also let cool in pan for about 10-15 minutes and cover pan with a wire rack and flip, tap the bottom a little for good measure and with the exception of one especially sticky double chocolate cake with chocolate chips. Good Luck! Andrea

FleurDeCake Posted 6 Jan 2010 , 4:55am
post #15 of 31

i use bakers joy alone and it works really well for me .

KoryAK Posted 6 Jan 2010 , 5:00am
post #16 of 31

p.a.r.c.h.m.e.n.t.

cupcakeco Posted 6 Jan 2010 , 5:00am
post #17 of 31

Another vote for Baker's Joy-- it's cheap and works like a charm. I hold the pan over the sink and spray COMPLETELY-- to the point where there is a white bubbly coating on the pan. Cakes slide out with no poking, prodding, or knife-running around the edge whatsoever.

A great tip for removing cakes from pans is using cake circles. So long as they are slightly larger than the pan, place a circle over the top of the pan, pick up pan being careful to hold both the circle and pan, and flip. Rest the pan on the counter with the circle underneath it, and slowly lift the pan straight up. Et Voila-- your cake icon_smile.gif

cindycraig Posted 6 Jan 2010 , 5:23am
post #18 of 31

I use Baker's Joy as well and have never had a cake stick. Love me some Baker's Joy... thumbs_up.gif

cathyscakes Posted 6 Jan 2010 , 5:27am
post #19 of 31

Me too, bakers joy. I use to hold my breath with the bigger cakes when I did the old method of greasing and flouring the pan. Now I never have a problem, they never stick now, I would be shocked now if it happened, where before I expected it.

karennayak Posted 6 Jan 2010 , 5:50am
post #20 of 31

I totally agree with KoryAK.

Parchment is PERFECT, Everytime!
Karen

indydebi Posted 6 Jan 2010 , 5:58am
post #21 of 31

I have greased-only-no-flour'd my pans for 30 years. I have them trimmed and out of the pan on the cooling rack within 2 minutes of coming out of the oven. I can't remember the last cake breaking that I had. (Unless you count the red velvet one that I just flat out dropped! Pink floor tiles anyone?)

I trim the cakes while they are still in the pan so there is a flat surface.
Then lay the cooling rack on top of the cake.
Holding the cooling rack in place, pick up the pan and rack together and flip.
Remove pan.
Place a 2nd cooling rack on the cake (which is now "bottoms up") and reflip so the cake is sitting on the perfectly flat bottom.

If your cake is breaking after it's removed from the pan, or as soon as it's removed from the pan:

If your cake is upside down on the cooling rack and has any kind of dome at all, gravity is going to take over and will pull those unsupported corners down, causing your cake to break. This is why you should (a) initially give it a flat surface (trim job) and then (b) immediately flip it onto it's perfectly flat bottom.

madgeowens Posted 6 Jan 2010 , 6:10am
post #22 of 31

line your pans with parchment paper and it will come out perfect

nastassia Posted 8 Jan 2010 , 6:24pm
post #23 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by prterrell

Are you turning the cakes out onto a cooling rack or trying to lift them out with a spatula?




oh I never use a spatula...not even a cooling rack either, (don't have one) I just put a plate on top and flip. but it manages to always tear from me icon_sad.gif the last time I even had to run to the store and buy a non-decorated cake from the bakery lol

I swear, I Love decorating, but absolutely hate making the cakes icon_sad.gif b/c I have so much trouble with it lol

nastassia Posted 8 Jan 2010 , 6:27pm
post #24 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lita829

I used to never use parchment but then I noticed that the cakes with oil as the fat, instead of butter, will definately stick...not matter how much shortening and flour I used to prepare the pans. I now always put shortening and flour on the sides and parchment, cut to fit the pan, on the bottom.




wow..that must be it...I always get soo frustrated...and yeah I always use cake mixes that ask for veg oil. should I also not be doing this? just using cake mixes...b/c I've also wanted to try a checkered cake...with chocolate and yellow mixed, but when I cut it (even after freezing) it crumbled from me icon_sad.gif I figure from using the moist cake mixes....so if I wanna try and cut or sculpt a cake should I definately not use a cake mix?

and thanks icon_smile.gificon_smile.gif

nastassia Posted 8 Jan 2010 , 6:28pm
post #25 of 31

thank you everyone...I'll definately try the parchment paper on the bottom for now since it is the bottom that sticks...I've never had problems with the sides sticking..

and yeah I've seen that spray with flour but it is pricey...($10 dollars a bottle) but I just might have to try it huh, b/c I'm spending way more money losing cakes anyway icon_sad.gif

cathyscakes Posted 8 Jan 2010 , 7:18pm
post #26 of 31

I use to use the parchment in the bottom of my cakes and I still had problems with the larger cakes sticking, right at the edge where the side of the pan and parchment meet. The price is a bit more, but well worth it, just for the peace of mind. The wilton pan release works really well too, have never had any cakes stick since I started using them.

Kitagrl Posted 8 Jan 2010 , 7:31pm
post #27 of 31

I use the homemade cake release (equal parts oil, shortening, and flour) and its awesome...put on with a pastry brush (silicone to avoid bristles falling out) and then turn cake out after its cooled for only like five minutes...ten at the most. Longer than that, and it starts to stick due to the moisture in the cake.

tbittner Posted 8 Jan 2010 , 7:35pm
post #28 of 31

I spray with cooking spray from Sam's Club (2 big cans for @$5) and then line the bottom only with parchment and then spray it all again. NO sticking issues ever.
Also I highly suggest getting the pre-cut rounds next time you order online. I buy the 9" from Country Kitchen SweetArt, $4 for 25. It is totally worth not having to cut them out all the time. You can get them all over online.
http://www.countrykitchensa.com/catalog/product.aspx?T=1&productId=625770

Tracy

Lita829 Posted 8 Jan 2010 , 7:44pm
post #29 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by nastassia

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lita829

I used to never use parchment but then I noticed that the cakes with oil as the fat, instead of butter, will definately stick...not matter how much shortening and flour I used to prepare the pans. I now always put shortening and flour on the sides and parchment, cut to fit the pan, on the bottom.



wow..that must be it...I always get soo frustrated...and yeah I always use cake mixes that ask for veg oil. should I also not be doing this? just using cake mixes...b/c I've also wanted to try a checkered cake...with chocolate and yellow mixed, but when I cut it (even after freezing) it crumbled from me icon_sad.gif I figure from using the moist cake mixes....so if I wanna try and cut or sculpt a cake should I definately not use a cake mix?

and thanks icon_smile.gificon_smile.gif




I found out this information the hard way...after losing a couple of cakes with oil where I didn't use parchment on the bottom icon_redface.gificon_sad.gif . I then put 2 and 2 togather.

I am not sure if using a cake mix with butter would be any different. I can't tell you from experience because I only use scratch recipes. However, you could try to use one of the box mixes that use softened butter, instead of melted (if there are any) along with parchment.

For cutting and sculpting a cake...I'd definately use a scratch recipe...and a recipe that is closer to a pound cake in texture.

HTH icon_smile.gif

Caths_Cakes Posted 8 Jan 2010 , 7:51pm
post #30 of 31

i use parchment, and have it slightly overlapping round the base, always get a perfect sided cake, never had it stick with way, takes about 2 mins longer to prep, but worth it.

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