100 3" X 3" Squares - Should I Ice Or Cover W/fond

Decorating By nhbaker Updated 12 Aug 2009 , 5:07pm by Lenette

nhbaker Posted 5 Aug 2009 , 10:57pm
post #1 of 17

I've got an order for 100 mini 3x3" square cakes. I was thinking of just icing them but lafter ooking through most of the pics on this site of mini cakes, I see that most people cover them in fondant. Any opinions on which is easier? B&G really don't care either way as they maybe said 3 words to me during the consult. I've charged enough to cover my time either way.

Thanks for your input!

16 replies
BeeBoos-8599_ Posted 5 Aug 2009 , 11:08pm
post #2 of 17

I vote for fondant but I would use a cake that is dense enough to support it. Don't you just love people who wont give you any info??

hammer1 Posted 5 Aug 2009 , 11:16pm
post #3 of 17

a would do poured ganache or poured fondant and save a bunch of time....i love chocolate ganache.

misha35 Posted 5 Aug 2009 , 11:17pm
post #4 of 17

I agree with the fondant....

cylstrial Posted 6 Aug 2009 , 1:33am
post #5 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by hammer1

a would do poured ganache or poured fondant and save a bunch of time....i love chocolate ganache.




I would definitely say poured (one or the other). It's going to take you tons of time to ice or fondant all of those little cakes.

Bijoudelanuit Posted 6 Aug 2009 , 2:11am
post #6 of 17

I'd do poured fondant! It should be so much quicker than either fondant or buttercream!!!

DefyGravity Posted 6 Aug 2009 , 2:29am
post #7 of 17

I've seen some on the Wilton yearbook that are coated in the chocolate coating, and they looked great! Fondant is a PITA already, you don't need to make it worse on yourself by doing it 100 times on a tiny scale icon_wink.gif

xstitcher Posted 6 Aug 2009 , 2:38am
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by cylstrial

Quote:
Originally Posted by hammer1

a would do poured ganache or poured fondant and save a bunch of time....i love chocolate ganache.



I would definitely say poured (one or the other). It's going to take you tons of time to ice or fondant all of those little cakes.




That's what I would do too. Those little cakes are a pain to ice and covering with fondant would take way too much time. If you haven't tried it yet do a couple of practice cakes first (mini ones that is).

Good luck! icon_smile.gif

tonedna Posted 6 Aug 2009 , 2:59am
post #9 of 17

The question is what are they expecting. The lookn will be completely different from one to the next. Pour fondant is not as smooth looking as fondant.
Edna icon_smile.gif

nhbaker Posted 6 Aug 2009 , 11:53am
post #10 of 17

It's really hard to know what they're expecting. Here's what they gave me for instructions. 100 mini cakes, chocolate cake, white outside, with an orange sugar calla lilly on top (they asked about just "frosting one on" but I said they would be prettier if done in sugarpaste). The bride also wants a small cake to cut. When I asked her how she wanted it to look she said, "I don't know, your the decorator". -- Yeah, until I do it and it's not what you had in mind!! Like I said, getting real information out of them was like pulling teeth. I was sort of hoping they wouldn't hire me, but lo and behold, the deposit came in the mail about a week after I met with them! So I guess, as long as they're nice, they'll be happy with whatever they get! I'll will document what I'm going to do in their contract that I'm working on finishing up. They have to look over and sign if all is okay -- so I guess I'll know then if they're good with my decision!!

I've covered petit fours in poured fondant before and hated it!! It might have had something to do with the product I was using (homemade - can't remember what recipe I used). If anyone has had butter luck, please let me know what you used.

Maybe white chocolate ganache?? It's going to be tough since the cake underneath is chocolate. UGGH! What did I get myself into!!??? icon_cry.gif

cylstrial Posted 6 Aug 2009 , 1:03pm
post #11 of 17

Wow NHbaker! That is going to be hard.

It sounds like you might have to do two coats of white chocolate ganache since it's chocolate cake.

Someone else with more experience will hopefully come along and help you out.

tonedna Posted 6 Aug 2009 , 1:21pm
post #12 of 17

I know these are not square but they are so cute

http://sugarbloomcupcakes.blogspot.com/2009/05/tall-cupcakes-tutorial.html

Edna icon_smile.gif

xstitcher Posted 6 Aug 2009 , 8:36pm
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonedna

I know these are not square but they are so cute

http://sugarbloomcupcakes.blogspot.com/2009/05/tall-cupcakes-tutorial.html

Edna icon_smile.gif




Those are great looking. Definitely looks easier to cover with fondant this way.

cylstrial Posted 7 Aug 2009 , 1:18pm
post #14 of 17

I love that website! It is awsome! I wish she would update it though. That has the been there since May with no updates!

DefyGravity Posted 7 Aug 2009 , 2:19pm
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonedna

I know these are not square but they are so cute

http://sugarbloomcupcakes.blogspot.com/2009/05/tall-cupcakes-tutorial.html

Edna icon_smile.gif




icon_eek.gif Those are beautiful!!

How tall are the mini cakes going to be? I'm looking at a coaster right now thats approx. 3x3 and that seems like a giant piece of cake.

nhbaker Posted 12 Aug 2009 , 4:58pm
post #16 of 17

about 2 - 2 1/2" high.

Lenette Posted 12 Aug 2009 , 5:07pm
post #17 of 17

I have seen mini cakes done by icing the top smooth and taking a star tip to the sides then topped with a monogram or flower which was a fondant cut out.

I think the star tip could be done neatly and quickly.

I wish you the best, that is a lot of work. Glad you charged enough!

Sometimes clients say do whatever and they mean it, others not so much. Definitely detail everything or sketch it and make them sign off on it. That was they can't complain later! icon_wink.gif

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