The Term "two-Layer Cake"

Decorating By niccicola Updated 22 Jul 2009 , 10:59pm by niccicola

niccicola Posted 21 Jul 2009 , 4:26pm
post #1 of 14

I don't know if I'm the odd one out, but I charge per serving according to how tall of a cake the client wants, either 2" or 4" tall.

So, I constantly get asked "I love your two-layer cakes! How much are they?" I'm constantly explaining that many of my cakes in my website gallery are 4" tall therefore have more than 2 layers of cake and one layer of filling. I can make as many as 3 layers of cake per 2" tall cake and 6 layers of cake per 4" tall cakes so I don't limit myself to "two-layer cakes".

Anyway, my question is how was this term coined? I explained recently that it was more for the home baker, as most domestic cake pans have a 2" depth and when baked, can be torted in half horizontally and filled with any filling.

What are your ideas on this? Am I making sense?

13 replies
Michellers Posted 21 Jul 2009 , 9:59pm
post #2 of 14

My thought of a 2-layer cake is 2 layers of cake, both being 2" tall, with filling in between. Making them at least 4" tall.

If you look at the Wilton chart it states how many servings based on 2 layers, plus it tells you how many cups of batter needed based on 1 layer being 2". Hope I explained that ok.

I also take each 2" cake and torte them, so I have 4 layers of cake and 3 layers of filling.

indydebi Posted 21 Jul 2009 , 10:15pm
post #3 of 14

All layers are not "layers".

A standard single layer cake is 2" tall.
Ergo a 2-layer cake is 4" tall.

You can slice-n-dice those layers into as many "layers" as you like. This is called torting, not layering.

A 2-layer cake is 4" tall, even if you've torted it into 6 or 8 "layers".

kakeladi Posted 21 Jul 2009 , 11:49pm
post #4 of 14

I do not understand your thinking re pricing per layer icon_sad.gif Why does it matter if there are 2, 3, or 1,000 layers (& filling) if it is a 2" tall cake it still only yield XXX servings as will a 4" cake only serve so many.

MrsMabe Posted 22 Jul 2009 , 1:42pm
post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi

I do not understand your thinking re pricing per layer icon_sad.gif Why does it matter if there are 2, 3, or 1,000 layers (& filling) if it is a 2" tall cake it still only yield XXX servings as will a 4" cake only serve so many.




See, I've always thought the same as the OP. If the cake is taller, then there's more cake there. Meaning more ingredients, which cost me money. So I'd charge more for 4 inches of cake than for 2 inches of cake. If I sold my cakes, that is.

leah_s Posted 22 Jul 2009 , 2:25pm
post #6 of 14

ditto Indy.

sadsmile Posted 22 Jul 2009 , 3:09pm
post #7 of 14

I would charge more for torting because of the time/skill involved and extra filling. But I agree 4" -2 layers is standard just like every picture on a box of cake mix.

niccicola Posted 22 Jul 2009 , 10:19pm
post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrsMabe

Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi

I do not understand your thinking re pricing per layer icon_sad.gif Why does it matter if there are 2, 3, or 1,000 layers (& filling) if it is a 2" tall cake it still only yield XXX servings as will a 4" cake only serve so many.



See, I've always thought the same as the OP. If the cake is taller, then there's more cake there. Meaning more ingredients, which cost me money. So I'd charge more for 4 inches of cake than for 2 inches of cake. If I sold my cakes, that is.




I don't price per layer. I price by either 2" tall cake or 4" tall cake for the reasons as the PP stated. More ingredients=more money, so more charge for the client. I use Wilton's party serving chart for party cakes for both 2" tall and 4" tall.

Adevag Posted 22 Jul 2009 , 10:28pm
post #9 of 14

Hi, I'm wondering if costumers are confused about the names and cake terms. I hear so many calling cake tiers cake layers. When your costumers tell you they like your two layer cakes, I think they mean your two tier cakes.

indydebi Posted 22 Jul 2009 , 10:31pm
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by niccicola

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrsMabe

Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi

I do not understand your thinking re pricing per layer icon_sad.gif Why does it matter if there are 2, 3, or 1,000 layers (& filling) if it is a 2" tall cake it still only yield XXX servings as will a 4" cake only serve so many.



See, I've always thought the same as the OP. If the cake is taller, then there's more cake there. Meaning more ingredients, which cost me money. So I'd charge more for 4 inches of cake than for 2 inches of cake. If I sold my cakes, that is.



I don't price per layer. I price by either 2" tall cake or 4" tall cake for the reasons as the PP stated. More ingredients=more money, so more charge for the client. I use Wilton's party serving chart for party cakes for both 2" tall and 4" tall.




Semantics, again.

A 10" square single layer cake yields 25 servings.
A 10" square 2-layer cake yields 50 servings.

Of course you charge more for the 2-layer cake; of course there's twice as much ingredients ..... it's twice as much cake so I hope you're charging twice as much for the 2-layer (4" tall cake) as you are for the single layer (2" tall cake).

niccicola Posted 22 Jul 2009 , 10:35pm
post #11 of 14

I get what you're saying, Indi.

No, I don't charge double. $1 more, actually.

My logic is that no matter how tall the cake is, you cut according to the cutting guide. So, 10" square=30 servings. The only difference is the height and the amount of cake per slice, depending on what the client ordered.

Maybe I'm going about this pricing thing all wrong. icon_surprised.gif Thanks for the help though!

indydebi Posted 22 Jul 2009 , 10:47pm
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by niccicola

I get what you're saying, Indi.

No, I don't charge double. $1 more, actually.

My logic is that no matter how tall the cake is, you cut according to the cutting guide. So, 10" square=30 servings. The only difference is the height and the amount of cake per slice, depending on what the client ordered.

Maybe I'm going about this pricing thing all wrong. icon_surprised.gif Thanks for the help though!




Help me make sure I understand what you're saying. If your regular price is $2/serving for a 2" tall cake, then your 4" tall price is $3? So I can get 100% more cake for only 50% more in price?

Single layer cake: PIece is cut in 2x2x2 = 8 cubic inches.

2-layer cake: Using your theory of cutting the same NUMBER of servings, then the cake is cut in 2x2x4 = 16 cubic inches. Twice as much cake per serving SHOULD mean twice as much price per serving.

That's how it works when I order a twice the size bucket of chicken. icon_rolleyes.gif

Texas_Rose Posted 22 Jul 2009 , 10:52pm
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adevag

Hi, I'm wondering if costumers are confused about the names and cake terms. I hear so many calling cake tiers cake layers. When your costumers tell you they like your two layer cakes, I think they mean your two tier cakes.




This is what I was thinking too.

niccicola Posted 22 Jul 2009 , 10:59pm
post #14 of 14

LOL Gosh, when you put it that way, yeah, I do need to charge more. Dang KFC does charge more icon_razz.gif you bring up very good and valid points, Indy.

$3 per serving for 2" tall and $4 per serving for 4" tall is the going rate for myself

--

true-I do think customers don't know terms. Heck, I guess you could say that I don't either! I bet she was talking about the 2 tier cakes

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