What Do You Do With The "egg Snot"?

Decorating By drummer27 Updated 29 Jun 2009 , 11:07pm by kjgjam22

drummer27 Posted 29 Jun 2009 , 3:14pm
post #1 of 28

I am wondering if anyone else has this problem and what you do. Sometimes when I am baking the egg whites contain small a gooey, snotty like blob in them. If I am thinking about it I usually pick it out but if I miss it or forget and bake it I'm usually the one that gets the "Blob" in their piece of brownie or cake. I've never had anyone say anything about it but to me it's chewy and disgusting, even though it's really small it bothers me. Could it be the kind of eggs I am using or am I just being overly picky?

27 replies
artscallion Posted 29 Jun 2009 , 3:21pm
post #2 of 28

I've never had anything like this problem and I can't even imagine how many tens of thousands of eggs I've used in my time. What kind of eggs are you using???

Tweedie Posted 29 Jun 2009 , 3:21pm
post #3 of 28

Ha ha, this is so funny to me because that is exactly what I call them..."snot". That's what my mom calls them and she has always picked them out so that's what I learned to do too. I don't think most people do b/c once you mix/bake or whatever it sort of disappears. It's mostly just the thought of it for me b/c it looks so yucky! Other people think we are crazy for doing it.

Tweedie Posted 29 Jun 2009 , 3:24pm
post #4 of 28

I just reread your post...I have never actually seen the white stuff in anything I've baked...maybe in a scratch pudding you could find it if you didn't put it thru a sieve, but not anything I've baked. They are in every egg I use so I don't think it's the type of egg or brand...they are in all eggs.

artscallion Posted 29 Jun 2009 , 3:25pm
post #5 of 28

Do you mean that occasional tiny thing that looks like a speck of blood? I ignore that and have never come upon it in my final product.

7yyrt Posted 29 Jun 2009 , 3:25pm
post #6 of 28

I assume you're talking of the chili thing. Chala, or whatever it is.
I just pick them out when I crack the eggs. They never will mix in completely.
Image

indydebi Posted 29 Jun 2009 , 4:20pm
post #7 of 28

I saw a lady on the food channel once make a big deal on how she pulls that little strand of white stuff out of all of her eggs. I laughed so hard I fell off of the couch .... couldn't imagine doing that to every egg I throw in the cake and cookie batters! icon_lol.gif And I'm a small operation!

I've never noticed any unbaked, uncooked, unprocessed egg white stuff in any of my baked items. Maybe you're not mixing it well enough? icon_confused.gif

lorrieg Posted 29 Jun 2009 , 5:24pm
post #8 of 28

It's the chalaza and it's what holds the yolk in place. If I'm making SMBC where I think it might make a lumpy bit in the final icing I pull it out. Otherwise it stays in in my kitchen. icon_lol.gif

sari66 Posted 29 Jun 2009 , 5:34pm
post #9 of 28

LOL I'm sorry to be laughing but that snot you see is part of every egg. Never heard of anyone picking it out. If it's still visible in your cooked food maybe you're not mixing it well enough. Although I can't see that happening either, you never know.

Renaejrk Posted 29 Jun 2009 , 5:35pm
post #10 of 28

I never knew what that was! I learn something new every day. I usually pick them out or strain them, but I don't do high volume stuff, and I use the cartons of egg whites a lot, especially for my meringue BC since they have been pasteurized.

lorrieg Posted 29 Jun 2009 , 5:44pm
post #11 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by sari66

LOL I'm sorry to be laughing but that snot you see is part of every egg. Never heard of anyone picking it out. If it's still visible in your cooked food maybe you're not mixing it well enough. Although I can't see that happening either, you never know.




You can definately see it in a fried egg if you look. It's a little on the rubbery side. I personally don't like to eat it on it's own (as in a single bite) because I don't like the texture. It's kind of slimy and chewy.

Cooking really doesn't have much to do with seeing it or not. I think some are "tougher" than others. Still I'd only pick it out of something I was making like meringue with pure egg whites.

if you use carton egg whites you don't get them. Or they've been pasturized into submission and have become one with the rest. icon_lol.gif

Kayakado Posted 29 Jun 2009 , 5:50pm
post #12 of 28

Okay, I am the freak here....LOL

I pick out the chalazae out of every egg with a pair of hemostats. I break them into a bowl, pick up the yolk in my fingers and clip the chalazae with the hemostats, pull it off and throw it away. I have had these things show up in baked good, especially dark chocolate and was grossed out.

lorrieg Posted 29 Jun 2009 , 5:52pm
post #13 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayakado

Okay, I am the freak here....LOL

I pick out the chalazae out of every egg with a pair of hemostats. I break them into a bowl, pick up the yolk in my fingers and clip the chalazae with the hemostats, pull it off and throw it away. I have had these things show up in baked good, especially dark chocolate and was grossed out.




Well I'm part-freak then! I never thought of the hemostats. I just rip 'em out with my bare fingers. icon_eek.gif Your way is probably more humane. icon_biggrin.gif

FromScratch Posted 29 Jun 2009 , 6:01pm
post #14 of 28

They are in every egg, but some are more solid than others. I put my whites through a china cap when I make frosting (SMBC), but I leave them in the baked goods... I've never moticed them in the final product though. I beat my egg whites and fold them into my vanilla butter cake and with my chocolate recipe they get beat well enough to break things up. Maybe if you lightly beat the eggs before you add them in it will make it less noticable? This way they will be broken up a bit before you mix them in and then when you do mix them in it will be enough to work it in. They never go away completely though.

cashley Posted 29 Jun 2009 , 6:02pm
post #15 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by artscallion

Do you mean that occasional tiny thing that looks like a speck of blood? I ignore that and have never come upon it in my final product.




If you are getting something like a tiny speck of blood it probably is and you shouldn't use that egg..

mommyle Posted 29 Jun 2009 , 6:03pm
post #16 of 28

Egg Snot!!!! Image
I was having a crappy day. Now I'm smiling!!! thanks, man!!!!

artscallion Posted 29 Jun 2009 , 6:34pm
post #17 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by cashley

Quote:
Originally Posted by artscallion

Do you mean that occasional tiny thing that looks like a speck of blood? I ignore that and have never come upon it in my final product.



If you are getting something like a tiny speck of blood it probably is and you shouldn't use that egg..




It's not that unusual. It's caused by a minuscule rupture of a blood vessel while the egg is produced inside the chicken. Its perfectly safe for consumption.

On the other hand, I need to pay closer attention to those whites. Now that I see that diagram 7yyrt posted, I do remember learning about that. Still I've never noticed it in my daily usage. Maybe I'm working too quickly and need to slow down. icon_biggrin.gif

drummer27 Posted 29 Jun 2009 , 6:45pm
post #18 of 28

Wow, thanks everyone. I'm glad to know that I'm not the only fussy one that picks them out! Sometimes I'll try and try to mix it in but some never seem to want to mix in so out they come. We raised chickens while I was growing up and I never knew about the chalazae. I sometimes use duck eggs from my Aunt and Uncle's flock and I don't think I've had that problem with them. The only thing is no one wants to eat baked goods if they hear they are baked with duck eggs...my husband wont even eat anything made from eggs right off the farm because they are from "chickens her knows". Strange. Anyway I guess I'll just continue to pick them out. Thanks!

sweetsbystacy Posted 29 Jun 2009 , 6:54pm
post #19 of 28

I'm never looking at egg whites the same way again.

FromScratch Posted 29 Jun 2009 , 6:54pm
post #20 of 28

Ooooh... he's missing out. Nothing better than freshly laid eggs. icon_biggrin.gif

JaimeAnn Posted 29 Jun 2009 , 7:01pm
post #21 of 28

I always called them the anchors and I pick them out... I didn't always but when I started working on my recipe for Lemon filling I noticed the globby little white things and started picking them out then it just became habit.

Gale Posted 29 Jun 2009 , 7:12pm
post #22 of 28

Now seeing blood, in any amount, is another story. IMO If there's blood in an egg, I throw the whole thing out. That's one reason I break my eggs in a separate bowl, one at a time.

giraffe11 Posted 29 Jun 2009 , 7:15pm
post #23 of 28

Plenty of eggs have the little red speck and are still perfectly usuable. It means the egg has been fertilized. I grew up on a farm with chickens, so every one of our eggs had the little speck. The only way to avoid the speck is to kill or sell off all of your roosters at a few days old, before the are sexually mature. If you get eggs from a small local operator, they will usually have the speck. Large chain providers claim to never sell fertilized eggs, ie: the hens are raised and kept with no roosters, therefore no fertilization.........but every once in a while, I still see some in those "rooster-free" eggs. Kinda makes you wonder if maybe there are rogue pigeons somewhere...... icon_lol.gif
The white stuff the OP was asking about? I never take it out. I can just imagine doing cakes with 12 egg whites if I had to fish all those things out! Ugh! I have never seen it in a baked good. I do think it annoying that it sometimes makes my eggs harder to separate. Oh well........

kello Posted 29 Jun 2009 , 7:28pm
post #24 of 28

I always take them out!!! Always have since the day I was about 12 and got the gooey white thing caught between my two front teeth. They usually will bake into whatever you're making, but the odd time I will find one. (if I didn't make it). I got my husband taking them out now too. icon_smile.gif
As for the small blood spot.....the egg has NOT been fertilized....and perfectly safe to eat. Though I wouldn't cuz I can't stomach it.

__Jamie__ Posted 29 Jun 2009 , 7:34pm
post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by lorrieg

It's the chalaza and it's what holds the yolk in place. If I'm making SMBC where I think it might make a lumpy bit in the final icing I pull it out. Otherwise it stays in in my kitchen. icon_lol.gif




I'll pull it out if it is freakishly huge...otherwise, I can't say I've ever noticed it intact after the first step of making SMBC. It has all been incorporated by the time I dump it into the KA bowl.

giraffe11 Posted 29 Jun 2009 , 7:53pm
post #26 of 28

Look I learn something new too........a red spot in your egg can mean your egg is fertilized, but is also commonly caused by a "bursted blood vessel during egg production"....That would explain why rooster-free eggs can have a red spot. My sister picks them out. They don't bother me.

Although here is a funny story.......we had a neighbor kid take care of our animals when we went on vacation one summer. He was to collect and keep the eggs as part of his payment. He failed to differentiate though, between the laying hens and the setting hen. Bad mistake.
He brought eggs to his mother who was making an omelette for her overnight guest. She broke an egg into the bowl and found....well, a partially-formed chick. She actually made it to 3 eggs before she gave up in disgust. They did not have omelets that morning at all. So gross!
Might be enough to make me go vegan for awhile. icon_eek.gif

lorrieg Posted 29 Jun 2009 , 9:47pm
post #27 of 28

Anyone who is unsure about eggs and the safety of them might want to check out http://www.aeb.org/LearnMore/EggSafety.htm. They explain about the blood spots and everything you need to know.

Numbers 7 & 8 pertain to both questions raised here.

In this world of food shortages and high prices I'd hate to think that someone would throw one out if they didn't have to. Especially when it's not anything bad.

JaimeAnn, lemon pudding/fillings are the other place I take out the chalazae. thumbs_up.gif

kjgjam22 Posted 29 Jun 2009 , 11:07pm
post #28 of 28

when i saw egg snot i knew exactly what you were talking about. icon_smile.gif

i have never had a problem with them. never seen them in the final product either. i remove them when i am seperating eggs. i have no clue why just a habit. but if the recipe calls for a whole egg then in it goes.

here in jamaica we refer to them as the eyes. who knows if they really do become the eyes.

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