Piping Gel As Adhesive

Decorating By BatterLover Updated 19 May 2009 , 10:56pm by HamSquad

BatterLover Posted 19 May 2009 , 12:16pm
post #1 of 9

I've been told that you should put about an inch of piping gel around the edges of your cake, on top of the buttercream icing, before applying the rolled fondant. Do most people do this? Won't the fondant stick to the buttercream without the gel? Thanks for any input.

8 replies
msulli10 Posted 19 May 2009 , 12:26pm
post #2 of 9

If you are putting your fondant on crusting buttercream, you might need a little extra "glue" to help seal it. I don't usually do this extra step and I find that the fondant sticks just fine.
If I find a spot that doesn't stick I just dab it with a wet brush. Usually when you are using the fondant smoother, the pressure helps adhere the fondant to the cake.

susanscakecreations Posted 19 May 2009 , 12:34pm
post #3 of 9

I find that my fondant usually sticks to my buttercream fine; the only thing I use piping gel for (so far) is writing or outlining......
HTH!

Cakepro Posted 19 May 2009 , 1:19pm
post #4 of 9

Wilton recommends the piping gel trick. Gravity will hold the fondant on the BC on the top of the cake, but you can use the piping gel or mist some water on the sides of the cake to help your fondant adhere to the BC - especially if it's a crusting BC.

Or you can put the cake in the fridge to let the icing chill and set up, then mist it with water and put your fondant on. That's what I do. icon_smile.gif

BatterLover Posted 19 May 2009 , 1:29pm
post #5 of 9

Excellent. Thanks for the additional ideas. I just find I'm romping through the piping gel if I apply it to all edges of all my cakes. I will try your other ideas.

sgauta Posted 19 May 2009 , 2:13pm
post #6 of 9

I've tried the piping gel technique twice and it was disastrous both times! I guess I used too much but it was hard not to, it can be so thick and "gloppy." Both times I had terrible show-through and had to take the fondant off and completely start over. These days I pretty much use crusting buttercreams, so I lightly mist them with water and then apply the fondant. Works like a charm! icon_biggrin.gif

~Sarah

HamSquad Posted 19 May 2009 , 2:25pm
post #7 of 9

I just add the fondant as soon as I have frosted the cake with BC before it has had time to really crust. It is still moist enough to adhere. I've never used piping gel on cakes to attach frondant. Make sure there isn't a lot of BC frosting put on cake before adding fondant, this also helps, I've had squishing of butter cream from under the cake at the bottom-LOL. hth icon_smile.gif
Hammy

Cakepro Posted 19 May 2009 , 6:08pm
post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by HamSquad

Make sure there isn't a lot of BC frosting put on cake before adding fondant, this also helps, I've had squishing of butter cream from under the cake at the bottom-LOL. hth icon_smile.gif
Hammy




If you refrigerate your cake for about 15 minutes prior to applying the fondant, the BC will set up quite hard and you can work your fondant to a flawless finish without the squishing problem. This also allows you to apply a regular layer of buttercream to your cake. HTH! icon_smile.gif

HamSquad Posted 19 May 2009 , 10:56pm
post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cakepro

Quote:
Originally Posted by HamSquad

Make sure there isn't a lot of BC frosting put on cake before adding fondant, this also helps, I've had squishing of butter cream from under the cake at the bottom-LOL. hth icon_smile.gif
Hammy



If you refrigerate your cake for about 15 minutes prior to applying the fondant, the BC will set up quite hard and you can work your fondant to a flawless finish without the squishing problem. This also allows you to apply a regular layer of buttercream to your cake. HTH! icon_smile.gif




Thanks Cake Pro, I will absolutely try this on my next project. I never knew to chill my cake with BC, I've always let they air crust.
Really appreciate your advice.
Hammy

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