1St Time Refridgerating Fondant Cake????

Decorating By ladixiechic1 Updated 21 May 2009 , 7:26am by Cakepro

ladixiechic1 Posted 18 May 2009 , 12:19pm
post #1 of 16

HELLO EVERYONE, I HAVE READ WHERE SOME OF YOU REFRIDGERATE YOUR FONDANT COVERED CAKES. DUE TO MY SCHEDULE, I HAVE DECIDE TO DO THIS.

I HAVE TORTED, CRUMB COATED AND PUT FONDANT ON MY TIERS AND REFRIDGERATED YESTERDAY. THIS EVENING I NEED TO BEGIN DECORATING, CAKE IS DUE TOMRROW AFTERNOON. HERE ARE MY QUESTIONS:

1. DO I LET THE CAKE COME TO ROOM TEMPERATURE BEFORE DECORATING?

2. DO I RETURN THE CAKE TO THE REFRIDGERATOR AFTER DECORATING?

ANY TIPS WOULD BE GREATLY APPRECIATED!!

15 replies
vickymacd Posted 18 May 2009 , 12:28pm
post #2 of 16

My understanding is NOT to frigerate fondant cake due to moisture.

but I definately would let it come to room temp since you've already put it in the frig.

I guess it depends on the filling.

tonicake Posted 18 May 2009 , 12:36pm
post #3 of 16

When the cakes begin to return to room temperature, they are going to condensate. Be sure not to dry them off or touch them with your fingers. Just let it dry on its own. If they are covered, be sure to take that off right away or the fondant will have marks on it. After that, they should be o.k.

I do this when I decorate, it keeps me from having to put the water on my fondant decorations.

Good luck!

tx_cupcake Posted 18 May 2009 , 12:36pm
post #4 of 16

I always refrigerate my fondant covered cakes. After I tort, fill and crumb coat, I chill the cake in the fridge for about 30 minutes. When it is nice a cold, I cover it in fondant and decorate. There will be some condensation beneath the fondant, but in my experience it just helps the fondant to better stick to the cake.

When I'm finished decorating, I cover the cake loosely with plastic wrap, and put it back in the fridge. About an hour before the cake is delivered, I remove it from the fridge, remove the plastic wrap and allow it to come to room temp. If any condensation forms, it usually evaporates within that hour. I'm just careful not to touch the cake until all condensation is gone.

I've never had any issues with handling my cakes this way. All I ever make are fondant covered cakes.

Hope this helps!

summernoelle Posted 18 May 2009 , 1:50pm
post #5 of 16

Do not put fondant cakes in the fridge-condensation will form on the fondant, which will hurt the finish.

I always cover my cakes when they are cold (after torting, filling and crumb coating). I let them settle in there for overnight to 24 hours. But I would never put it back in the fridge when done.

ladixiechic1 Posted 18 May 2009 , 6:31pm
post #6 of 16

THANKS FOR THE REPLYS!!! I AM REALLY NERVOUS icon_sad.gif ABOUT THIS BUT I JUST HAD TOO MUCH TO DO AT ONE TIME. MOST OF THE TIME I HAVE TO DO MY CAKES IN STAGES OVER SEVERAL DAYS. icon_biggrin.gif

Cakepro Posted 18 May 2009 , 10:55pm
post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by txcupcake

I always refrigerate my fondant covered cakes. After I tort, fill and crumb coat, I chill the cake in the fridge for about 30 minutes. When it is nice a cold, I cover it in fondant and decorate. There will be some condensation beneath the fondant, but in my experience it just helps the fondant to better stick to the cake.

If any condensation forms, it usually evaporates within that hour. I'm just careful not to touch the cake until all condensation is gone.

I've never had any issues with handling my cakes this way. All I ever make are fondant covered cakes.

Hope this helps!




This is exactly what I do. I do NOT like leaving fondant cakes out at room temp. It makes the fondant form a hard shell. If you airbrush the cake with vodka before refrigerating it, any condensation that forms on it when it returns to room temperature will be very fine and evaporate quickly.

Tomoore Posted 20 May 2009 , 2:19am
post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cakepro

If you airbrush the cake with vodka before refrigerating it, any condensation that forms on it when it returns to room temperature will be very fine and evaporate quickly.




Cakepro, can you elaborate. I just opened my airbrush today and am clueless. Am I supposed to mix the colors with vodka before spraying?

Also, to spray with luster (i.e silver), do I make a paint of the dust and alcohol (...which may be rum, cause that's all I have in house...is that cool?) and put it in the cup of the gun?

TIA,
Toni

Cakepro Posted 20 May 2009 , 4:07am
post #9 of 16

Hi Toni,

I really jacked up both of my airbrushes by spraying luster dust and vodka through them. I had to tear them apart, clean them, reassemble them, and then let plain vodka sit in the airbrush to help loosen all the pearl dust residue. Americolors makes liquid airbrush pearl dusts in quite a few beautiful colors. I highly recommend you use those. I still cut them with a little vodka because it sprays better for me with a little more liquid.

If you just want to spray your cake with vodka to help combat any condensation problems after the cake has been removed from the fridge, just spray it with plain vodka. Rum would probably work too. Just don't use flavored liquors that have sugar in them, because that will gum stuff up in the airbrush too.

What kind of airbrush did you get? Congrats on the new toy! icon_smile.gif

Tomoore Posted 20 May 2009 , 4:16am
post #10 of 16

Oh goodness...I don't know the name. It wasn't from a cake site...though they did bundle it with 12 Americolor. icon_smile.gif I am soooo glad you responded so quickly, cuz I was on my way to do exactly that. Now I will just paint the silver parts of this cake and order these colors you mentioned tomorrow. Now, I am going to be spraying most of the cake black. Should I cut the black with alcohol, or use the color straight from the bottle?

THANKS!
Toni

Cakepro Posted 20 May 2009 , 4:23am
post #11 of 16

Use the black straight from the bottle, uncut. You are going to have so much fun! icon_biggrin.gif

Just keep overspray in mind. Even though you can't see it, that airbrush color will find its way everywhere. If you can, do this in an area that you can easily wipe down, such as on a kitchen countertop against a backsplash/wall.

I have even used my fireplace screen (it's a tri-fold screen) with beach towels as a little "airbrush booth" for dark colors. icon_smile.gif

Tomoore Posted 20 May 2009 , 4:26am
post #12 of 16

Oh I'm In love! I just used it on a portion of the cake! (I'm really quite giddy over here!) Okay, now, how long will it take to dry and should I have a terrible problem with the condensation dripping. I had that issue when I would paint. The paint would mix with the condensation and drip down the cake...leaving marks of course.

I think I may pick up one of the tri-fold science fair project boards tomorrow. Oh, I'm so happy with this things. Any other tips you wanna give regarding it?

Tomoore Posted 20 May 2009 , 4:53am
post #13 of 16

Oh I'm In love! I just used it on a portion of the cake! (I'm really quite giddy over here!) Okay, now, how long will it take to dry and should I have a terrible problem with the condensation dripping. I had that issue when I would paint. The paint would mix with the condensation and drip down the cake...leaving marks of course.

I think I may pick up one of the tri-fold science fair project boards tomorrow. Oh, I'm so happy with this things. Any other tips you wanna give regarding it?

Tomoore Posted 20 May 2009 , 4:54am
post #14 of 16

Okay. I can't wait to post my pic. I am in HEAVEN! lol...can you tell I'm excited. I can't believe I've been decorating for two and a half years and JUST got this thing!

Rylan Posted 20 May 2009 , 10:08pm
post #15 of 16

I've refrigerated a cake before decorating, after decorating and even while the cake was cold. I've never had a problem.

Cakepro Posted 21 May 2009 , 7:26am
post #16 of 16

Post pics!!!! Imageicon_biggrin.gif

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