Fondant Covered Cake Board/drum

Decorating By Mikel79 Updated 18 Jul 2009 , 8:19am by miny

Mikel79 Posted 7 Apr 2009 , 7:14pm
post #1 of 23

Good Day All!

I would like to know some helpful tips when covering your cake drum or cake board with fondant.

I know how to actually cover it. My problem is when I should place the cake on it.

I covered my cake drum several days in advance and iced my cake seperately. I then trasferred the butter cream cake that was on a cake circle to the fondant cake drum. WHAT A MESS. The bottom edges looked terrible from my fingers and "hamburger flipper".

Has anyone iced a cake DIRECTLY on the fondant covered board? If so, did you have any tears, oil spots etc.

Any advise is appreciated.

Thank you

22 replies
brincess_b Posted 7 Apr 2009 , 8:43pm
post #2 of 23

i bc my cakes on naked cake boards, i guess the same applies to fondan,t you just have to clean it up round the edges afterwards. although with fondant, u wont be able to rub so hard!
xx

bashini Posted 7 Apr 2009 , 9:09pm
post #3 of 23

Hi there, welcome to CC. Do you use a thin board under your cake as the same size as your cake? If you do like that, you can easily transfer the cake and stick it to the fondant covered cake with a bit of royal icing.

Or you can use the bandage method. Here's how it is done,

http://www.flickr.com/photos/extra-icing/sets/72157594575839118

HTH. icon_smile.gif

Tee-Y Posted 7 Apr 2009 , 9:28pm
post #4 of 23

I usually cover my cake board and let it dry at least overnight, then I let my covered cake(on a cake card) dry too before I transfer it to the board usually with a strong pallette knife.

Tee-Y Posted 7 Apr 2009 , 9:28pm
post #5 of 23

I usually cover my cake board and let it dry at least overnight, then I let my covered cake(on a cake card) dry too before I transfer it to the board usually with a strong pallette knife.

sugarshack Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 12:38am
post #6 of 23

I do my board after the cake is all done and decorated. applying it bandage roll style. that way i dont mess it up!

BlakesCakes Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 2:16am
post #7 of 23

Well, I don't put buttercream cakes on fondant covered boards--just a personal preference. For buttercream cakes, I cover the board with food safe foil or with decorative paper covered in clear contact paper. I put each tier on a board the same size. I often decorate the BC cake directly on the covered board and then just clean off any mess pretty easily.

If I were to put a BC cake on a fondant board, I'd cover the board, allow it to dry, put some royal on the board, and after chilling/freezing the BC cake (with the finish coat of BC on it), then I'd transfer it to the fondant board, make repairs, and finish decorating. If the BC is well chilled, it's pretty hard to mess it up if you're very careful with the transfer.

HTH
Rae

Mikel79 Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 12:38pm
post #8 of 23

Thanks everyone for answering my question.
I will try this again....

Cakepro Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 7:57pm
post #9 of 23

If y'all are covering your entire cake board in fondant, that's quite a bit of waste!

Here's what I do (instructions and pic): http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-photo_1343909.html

BlakesCakes Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 8:15pm
post #10 of 23

I usually cover the whole board. I often use leftover fondant that I re-color.

I think the issue is a choice to waste some product or some time.

I find that when I use the "bandage" method, or even make a cut-out of the the cake shape and remove that piece of fondant before final positioning of the cake, I have to spend time rolling, measuing, cutting, finessing, etc.

I choose to waste 50 cents worth of fondant rather than 10 minutes of my time. Probably a wash.

Rae

Cakepro Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 8:21pm
post #11 of 23

Good point!

The one thing tha saves me time is having my handy dandy KA pasta roller on the work table to send long snakes of fondant through, which makes the strips really quickly. If I had to roll them out by hand, I would totally agree that it's quicker to cover the whole board.

Win Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 8:33pm
post #12 of 23

I, too, cover the whole board with fondant. [url]
Mikel79: Wilton makes an awesome cake lifter. It will eliminate any issues of lifting a cake onto any kind of board ever again. If needed, two will lift an extra large cake. It's one of those things I'm so happy to have gone ahead and purchased.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B001BOELLI/?tag=cakecentral-20

pinktea Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 8:40pm
post #13 of 23

Thanks bashini for the pictures on the bandage method . thumbs_up.gif

pattycakesnj Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 8:46pm
post #14 of 23

I too use the Wilton cake lifter, it is great and you don't have the problem of finger marks etc. I have 2 and use both when lifting a sheet cake that I torted

iris711 Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 9:01pm
post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by bashini

Hi there, welcome to CC. Do you use a thin board under your cake as the same size as your cake? If you do like that, you can easily transfer the cake and stick it to the fondant covered cake with a bit of royal icing.

Or you can use the bandage method. Here's how it is done,

http://www.flickr.com/photos/extra-icing/sets/72157594575839118

HTH. icon_smile.gif




Wow, that looks easy. Thanks for the input. I loved your tutorial.
Thanks
thumbs_up.gif

superstar Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 9:20pm
post #16 of 23

I only cover a cake board with fondant if I am covering the cake with fondant. I cover the whole board & then place the cake pan that I baked the cake in on the fondant, cut around it and remove the part that is going to be covered by the cake. I allow the board to dry at least overnight. I always put a normal amount of BC under my fondant so the cake is placed on a cardboard that just fits under the cake, I usually BC the cake & cover it with fondant after I have placed it on the fondant cake board, doing it this way, you have to be careful but it works for me when doing a large cake, anything up to 10" I am comfortable moving it to the board after I have covered it.

xstitcher Posted 9 Apr 2009 , 6:34am
post #17 of 23

You can always just use a big old bbq hamburger flipper to help lift your cakes.

bashini Posted 9 Apr 2009 , 8:30am
post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by iris711

Quote:
Originally Posted by bashini

Hi there, welcome to CC. Do you use a thin board under your cake as the same size as your cake? If you do like that, you can easily transfer the cake and stick it to the fondant covered cake with a bit of royal icing.

Or you can use the bandage method. Here's how it is done,

http://www.flickr.com/photos/extra-icing/sets/72157594575839118

HTH. icon_smile.gif



Wow, that looks easy. Thanks for the input. I loved your tutorial.
Thanks
thumbs_up.gif




iris711, just want to let you know that, it is not my tutorial. Its done by our famous aine2. icon_smile.gif

iris711 Posted 9 Apr 2009 , 1:52pm
post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by bashini

Quote:
Originally Posted by iris711

Quote:
Originally Posted by bashini

Hi there, welcome to CC. Do you use a thin board under your cake as the same size as your cake? If you do like that, you can easily transfer the cake and stick it to the fondant covered cake with a bit of royal icing.

Or you can use the bandage method. Here's how it is done,

http://www.flickr.com/photos/extra-icing/sets/72157594575839118

HTH. icon_smile.gif



Wow, that looks easy. Thanks for the input. I loved your tutorial.
Thanks
thumbs_up.gif



iris711, just want to let you know that, it is not my tutorial. Its done by our famous aine2. icon_smile.gif




Oh... thanks to anie2 and to you for posting it.

bashini Posted 9 Apr 2009 , 2:22pm
post #20 of 23

No problem! icon_wink.gif

licia Posted 10 Apr 2009 , 1:38pm
post #21 of 23

Great information for covering a cake/cakeboard with fondant. Thanks!

JanH Posted 18 Jul 2009 , 2:16am
post #22 of 23
miny Posted 18 Jul 2009 , 8:19am
post #23 of 23

That looks pretty easy, I've to try it. Thanks!

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