First Wedding Cake

Decorating By Treena Updated 19 Feb 2009 , 4:07am by FromScratch

Treena Posted 17 Feb 2009 , 6:55pm
post #1 of 14

Hi everyone! I am not new to this site but I have never posted a topic or picture. I have done many round layer cakes and usually decorate with fruit, nuts, chocolate curls etc. My very close friend wants me to make her wedding cake. She wants a 3 tier square cake. Ivory frosting decorated with chocolate circles and dipped strawberries. I have in mind what it will look like but want advice on a few things. What do I use for the board or cake plate? What do I use to stack the layers (10 in, 9 in and 8 in)? How do I make the buttercream icing ivory (I'm too scared to try fondant yet!)? And, any advice on making the square corners? Thanks for any and all help!

13 replies
Cakepro Posted 17 Feb 2009 , 7:13pm
post #2 of 14

Hello,

You have asked very basic questions, the answers to which can be found by using the search function of the site.

Simply searching on terms such as "ivory" or "square corners" or "stacking" will yield all of the answers you seek.

prterrell Posted 17 Feb 2009 , 11:36pm
post #3 of 14

First off, your tiers are too close in size. Remember that there will only be 1/2 of the size difference around each tier. Right now you're allowing yourself 1/2" for icing, curls and strawberries. That just won't work.

Tiers should be a minimum of 3" difference, with 4" better, especially since you are putting chocolate curls and strawberries on there. So, for an 8" top tier, the middle tier should be 12" and the bottom 16".

To tint the buttercream ivory, simply use ivory color (both Wilton and Americolor make ivory gel paste).

There are several different support systems for stacked cakes. But they all work on the same basic premise of dowels (plastic or wooden) inside the bottom and middle tier supporting the tiers above them. The top and middle tiers will need to be either on cake boards or plastic cake plates (if you are using a system that locks the plate and plastic dowels together).

Do do at least one practice cake if you've never done a stacked cake before!

turtle3264 Posted 18 Feb 2009 , 12:04am
post #4 of 14

Go to the articles section on here and they have an article on square corners. I had never even thought of doing them this way.

kandu001 Posted 18 Feb 2009 , 12:22am
post #5 of 14

10, 9, 8 will look almost cone like. I would do 2-3 inch difference in pan size for the cakes. Make sure that you support your tiers very well. I use dowel rods, but Leahs and many others swear by SPS only, but I've never tried it. I use uncovered cake boards in between tiers and a cake stand, or large decorative board/base at the bottom. Good Luck!

debster Posted 18 Feb 2009 , 12:44am
post #6 of 14

If you have a wilton book in the back it shows how to stack a cake or go to www.wilton.com and search their site on how to stack a cake. You'll be fine if you do what's needed to make it stable. If you do cake boards over plastic seperators double them up , I use hot glue between my boards and when done sharpen a long wooden dowel and hammer it from top to bottom to help keep the whole cake from swaying. Hope this makes sence.

I never used that technique until they told me here to do it, now I have people picking up 3 tiered B-day cakes and taking them home themselves. Good luck!!!!

ptanyer Posted 18 Feb 2009 , 1:15am
post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by debster

sharpen a long wooden dowel and hammer it from top to bottom to help keep the whole cake from swaying.




What size dowel do you normally use?
How do you sharpen it? and
Will the sharpened dowel go through the cake boards, esp if they are doubled up?

I too have a wedding cake in a couple of weeks and have a 14", 12", 10" and 8". Will a dowel go all the way through the layers and cake boards?

Thanks.

pinkpiggie78 Posted 18 Feb 2009 , 1:33pm
post #8 of 14

I use the 3/8 size dowel I think... and I sharpen it with a kitchen knife. I have had no problems hammering it through cakeboards.

FromScratch Posted 18 Feb 2009 , 2:05pm
post #9 of 14

I use a pencil sharpener (that's only for cakes) to sharpen dowels for a center dowel. It will go through your boards, just ease it through.

I personally think that a 3" difference between tiers is best and 2" isn't bad either, but 4" is a bit too much. That's just me though. I like 1" difference too, but it has to be a very simple cake and it looks best on smaller cakes. I just did a 5-6-7 dummy for a show with a single magnolia on the side at the base of the second tier and it looks nice, but an 8-9-10 will look odd. I think an 8" topper is too big. How many servings are you looking for? An 8-9-10 will give you 120 servings. I think you'd be better off doing a 6-9-12 for 125 servings. icon_smile.gif

I love the SPS system, but I also use wooden dowels on occastion and they work fine. just make sure they are level and all the same size.

debster Posted 18 Feb 2009 , 6:54pm
post #10 of 14

I use the wilton wooden dowels, like Jkalman I hammer them through doubled boards it's easier than you think. I also use a pencil sharpener. Works like a charm.

While we are on the SPS system since the boards are plastic is there any way to put a dowel down the center if your traveling so it doesn't sway?

prterrell Posted 18 Feb 2009 , 7:28pm
post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkalman

I personally think that a 3" difference between tiers is best and 2" isn't bad either, but 4" is a bit too much. That's just me though. I like 1" difference too, but it has to be a very simple cake and it looks best on smaller cakes. I just did a 5-6-7 dummy for a show with a single magnolia on the side at the base of the second tier and it looks nice, but an 8-9-10 will look odd. I think an 8" topper is too big. How many servings are you looking for? An 8-9-10 will give you 120 servings. I think you'd be better off doing a 6-9-12 for 125 servings. icon_smile.gif




I agree. 3" difference seems to be the PERFECT balance. But, when you're putting strawberries around the tiers, I find that 4" gives you enough room to have nice big strawberries and not have to worry about them falling off.

I also agree about 8" being huge for a top tier. Unless they have a cake topper that requires that much space, 6-9-12 or 6-10-14 (if you want the extra "shelf" space for the berries) would be best. IMHO 4, 5, or 6 inches are the ideal top tier sizes (unless you are doing a mini cake).

FromScratch Posted 18 Feb 2009 , 10:48pm
post #12 of 14

If you really wanted to you could drill a hole in the plastic plate, but it's really not necessary. I travel with 4 tiered cakes fully stacked all the time with no issues. icon_smile.gif

debster Posted 18 Feb 2009 , 10:59pm
post #13 of 14

jKalman....... Is that with the plastic plates with the plastic round dowels? Thanks

FromScratch Posted 19 Feb 2009 , 4:07am
post #14 of 14

Yes it is. You can get them at Global Sugar Art and they aren't expensive, or you can get them from oasis supply.. they are good especially if you are going to order a bunch. icon_smile.gif They make for a very sturdy cake, and they are cheap enough to not have to worry about getting them back. They are made by Bakery Crafts.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%