Cheesecake Question

Decorating By kymscakes Updated 30 Jun 2008 , 8:57pm by Homemade-Goodies

kymscakes Posted 30 Jun 2008 , 1:26pm
post #1 of 9

Can I put a cardboard round in my springform pan under my crust so I can box it up without giving away a piece of my pan? I think I have seen this done but I am not sure if people bake the cheesecake with the cardboard in the pan or what. Any suggestions would be very appreciated.
Thanks,
Kym

8 replies
lsawyer Posted 30 Jun 2008 , 2:02pm
post #2 of 9

Yes, this can be done. Wilton has instructions in their book. All you have to do is put parchment paper (circle) in the pan, then the cardboard round, then another circle of parchment paper on top of that.

MaisieBake Posted 30 Jun 2008 , 5:08pm
post #3 of 9
Quote:
Quote:

Wilton has instructions in their book. All you have to do is put parchment paper (circle) in the pan, then the cardboard round, then another circle of parchment paper on top of that




Parchment above and below the round? Wilton must sell parchment.

lsawyer Posted 30 Jun 2008 , 8:23pm
post #4 of 9

Why, yes, Wilton DOES sell parchment paper! I always buy the generic brand at the grocery store. I don't care for the type that has silicone in it; it's too slippery for my uses.

PinkZiab Posted 30 Jun 2008 , 8:43pm
post #5 of 9

A well-chilled cheesecake is sturdier than you'd think. I bake mine in regular round cake pans, and then flip em out just like a normal cake, only onto a plastic wrap covered cake circle, then over again onto a clean cardboard. However, if you just put parchment on the bottom of the springform before putting the form around it, once you release it you can just slide the cake off onto cardboard and trim away the excess parchment.

Sugar_Plum_Fairy Posted 30 Jun 2008 , 8:45pm
post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by lsawyer

Why, yes, Wilton DOES sell parchment paper! I always buy the generic brand at the grocery store. I don't care for the type that has silicone in it; it's too slippery for my uses.




I thought that was the 'reason' for parchment paper. Seriously, I believe it was on one episode of Good Eats where Alton explains that the difference between wax paper and parchment paper (and why they're not really interchangable) is that wax will melt at a certain temperature so wax paper isn't good for everything, where as parchment paper has silicone.

Please correct me if I'm wrong.

Sugar_Plum_Fairy Posted 30 Jun 2008 , 8:46pm
post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by lsawyer

Why, yes, Wilton DOES sell parchment paper! I always buy the generic brand at the grocery store. I don't care for the type that has silicone in it; it's too slippery for my uses.




I thought that was the 'reason' for parchment paper. Seriously, I believe it was on one episode of Good Eats where Alton explains that the difference between wax paper and parchment paper (and why they're not really interchangable) is that wax will melt at a certain temperature so wax paper isn't good for everything, where as parchment paper has silicone.

Please correct me if I'm wrong.

PinkZiab Posted 30 Jun 2008 , 8:49pm
post #8 of 9

You're right, ALL parchment paper has silicone (that is, all parchment made for cooking/baking), but some are more "slippery" than others. I, too, prefer the thinner type that doesn't feel "glossy."

Homemade-Goodies Posted 30 Jun 2008 , 8:57pm
post #9 of 9

Amazing that this question just came up...kismet, baby!!

I was just wondering about baking the round under the wax paper I use...though the wax paper DOES get all wimpy, I was going to try parchment next as well. Until I get around to buying a second springform pan, I need to re-use it right away and can't wait for the first cake to chill completely down. Thus, need some better stability underneath.

Thanks for posing the question for me, Kym!!! icon_wink.gif

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